Steve R's Profile

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Di Fara Pizza HORRIBLE

Depending on the date chosen, you might only need 10. Sounds good.

about 2 hours ago
Steve R in Outer Boroughs

Fairway Cheese Dep't

Yeah, yeah. Just making sure you realized it, since your CH page says that you wish you could get rid of notifications on some old threads with new posts. Zounds? :-)

about 14 hours ago
Steve R in Manhattan

Fairway Cheese Dep't

You do realize that the rest of this thread is 9 years old, right? Just about the time that Fairway started rapidly expanding. Now, 9 years later, lots of changes have occurred but we find the cheese dept. at our Red Hook store to remain pretty darn good… service and product.

1 day ago
Steve R in Manhattan

Delaware and Hudson - Patti Jackson in Williamsburg

Hopefully it'll be around for quite awhile, but the lack of buzz to date is confusing. It's been open for approx. 2 months and is in the former Egg spot on N.5th St (off Bedford) in Williamsburg and has about 40 seats. It's an interesting format… for the $48pp fixed price, you choose your entree (there's a fish, a meat or a veggie option that changes regularly) and everything else is brought for the table to share. Everything else means 6-8 small plates of delicious food, from (the 2 times we were there) fava bean hummus to oysters to smoked bacon w/string beans to raw veggies to green tomato tart to stuffed squash flowers to…. well, you get the idea. Then a smallish "2nd course" plate (same to everyone) which also changes regularly & is listed on the menu, then your entree. The 2 nights we were there, the fish was tuna one night (sushi quality) and pike the other; the meat was lamb medallions one night & hanger steak the other. All were excellent. After this, desserts come out and each person gets 3-4 small ones on a plate (like bite sized strawberry short cake, a rich choc. cake, some berries…). Then, just to max out the sugar fix, another plate of assorted sweets (pistachio white choc. and other small bites). Wines are well selected and sold by the glass (around $10) or bottles ($30-$70, one or two above). http://delawareandhudson.com if you want to know more about the chef or the concept. For me, the proof's on the plate. Go now.

1 day ago
Steve R in Outer Boroughs

How A Major American Travel Magazine--Conde Nast Traveler--Gets Paris Food Shopping Hilariously Wrong!

First of all, a lot of trouble can be saved by using http://www.simplygourmand.com, as they carry beaucoup de French products and ship quickly… I've just looked to double check, so I know that they list jars of cassolet, the fruit juice syrups and several other things on the list, including an extended Bonne Maman inventory. I believe they are based in NYC to boot (Washington Hts. area). Outside of this, several items are actually pretty easy to find: The cordial juice syrups (not the brand shown) & a couple of other products (jars of pates, etc) are found at ethnic groceries like Kalustyan's (Lex. Ave) or Sahadi's (Atlantic Ave, Bklyn) or even some chain stores like Fairway or Garden of Eden. Of course, small goat cheeses & macarons are at most outdoor markets &/or in artisanal bakeries/cheese shops all around NYC but I'm sure you weren't asking about these.

Jul 20, 2014
Steve R in France

Guide to NYC's 10 Best Greek Restaurants and Tavernas

Holy crap! I'd never heard of this place & just went on their website. The owner/chef is the long lost (at least to me) guy from my favorite place of 20+ years ago Roumeli Taverna. If he's cooking at anywhere near his place's original level (he sublet Roumeli for the latter years and it went downhill), it's well worth a try. Thanks for the link & recommendation.

Jul 19, 2014
Steve R in Outer Boroughs

Eggplant parm I want some. Recs in Brooklyn

Depends on what style you want. The old line red sauce version aint bad at New Corners in Dyker (they make a dynamite version of eggplant rollatine as well). On the other hand, there is a very nice version, less heavy but with fresher flavor, at AlMar in Dumbo. Credible versions at a bunch of other places. Personally (as my wife cringes), I love Vinny of Carroll Gdns (Smith St) for a large serving with a fresh loaf of bread… a little greasy but just the way I remember it growing up.

Jul 19, 2014
Steve R in Outer Boroughs

Guide to NYC's 10 Best Greek Restaurants and Tavernas

I happen to agree with what I think is the thrust of your posts here; that except for fresh fish simply grilled, its hard to find real down home (or upscale) Greek food with solid flavors anymore. The dishes are there, but the cooking seems, well like a light beer compared to beer. It seems to be easier these days to get this in Turkish or Middle Eastern places (I guess the most similar to Greek that can be had). That being said, have you tried MP Taverna on Ditmars? http://michaelpsilakis.com/mp-taverna... I haven't, but Michael Psilikis has a pretty good reputation.

eta: just saw that queenseats already recommended it.

Jul 17, 2014
Steve R in Outer Boroughs
1

Tourist Hate

Well, actually, I meant that its the confluence of the 2 factors that pretty much impacts things. It means that a smaller # of folks are left to respond to a lot of requests on the France, Italy and similar other places boards due to the language restriction (there are many monolingual food experts in Paris, I'm sure, that don't write (or wish to write) in English or on a predominantly English speaking board). On the non-big city boards in the US, there aren't as many requests, nor as many choices of places & on the big city boards in English speaking areas (NYC, London…) there is more potential for responses & opinions from non-regulars, since English is the common language of all (except maybe a handful of us Brooklynites). NYC is a prime example -- as you know, there are as many "coming in for 3 days, where do I go eat…?" or "what's the best…?" requests there as here, but there are more people responding (yes, I know… Kathryn is an exception…our very own JT). By the way, I don't mean my statement to be a complete analysis, only to add on to ptipois' post.

Jul 16, 2014
Steve R in France

Tourist Hate

2 factors that I think contribute heavily to this are that 1)CH is an English language board, limiting who can participate in places like France, Italy, etc. & 2)Paris is a famous big city with lots of tourists coming & going, needing advice.

Jul 16, 2014
Steve R in France

Tourist Hate

I honestly don't know why that's so hard to do for some people. Whether good natured quipping (which, really, is what some of it is) or otherwise, take what you want & ignore the rest… it's an internet board & they really can't hurt you. Like everything else, it's a pain/gain equation that each of us has to decide for ourselves. I've given up trying to convince folks to stay on CH (or other) boards…that's their call. But there's a lot of value to communication with others about things we care about, even if all of the communication is not "feel good". I thank the folks here on the France board for all the help they gave me with my recent trip & really don't fault them for not being as sweet as those who helped me with past trips on the Italy board :-)

Jul 16, 2014
Steve R in France
2

How A Major American Travel Magazine--Conde Nast Traveler--Gets Paris Food Shopping Hilariously Wrong!

Just vis a vis the availability issue: at least 9 of the listed products are readily available in NYC. Maybe not the same brands but still, bad research on their part.

Jul 15, 2014
Steve R in France

Your favorite tapas?

Quinto Pino and Txikito are owned by the same couple and both are excellent (as is their Bklyn place La Vara). However, if you're looking to have a full dinner & aren't very light eaters, your budget may not cover the tab there. They are known for small portions (yes, I know they're tapas, but these are still pretty small) at highish prices. My wife and I drop $150-$180 (all in w/drinks, tax & tip) when we have a reasonably sizable meal of small plates at La Vara.

foodwhisperer: we went to Kana quite a few years ago and enjoyed it. It wasn't at as high a level as Tia Pol (at that time, when the owners of Quinto Pino were cooking there), but it was well worth going. I haven't heard much about it for a very long time now & would be interested in your take.

Jul 09, 2014
Steve R in Manhattan

Overwhelmed -should I worry about making more reservations Paris 7/23-29

Apparently, it was going downhill that was the problem (did I just say that?)

Jun 27, 2014
Steve R in France

Five Nights in Lyon on the way to and from Provence

Driving down from Paris to our apartment rental in Vaison-la-Romaine in May, we left 3 nights open for a stop along the way. While in Paris, we decided that Lyon would be the stop. I was anxious to try a Bocuse place, a Bouchon and maybe another basic restaurant in the area that seemed to get some attention. Well, we couldn't get into Palegrie, recommended by some seemingly knowledgeable folks who we met on line at Chateaubriand in Paris, so we went to Archange instead… a husband/wife place that also seemed well regarded. We had a lovely meal in a very nice setting at a good price point, the details of which I find not to have noted at all. Good memories are all that I can convey here.

We stayed at the Le Royal Lyon on Bellecour Square &, as it turns out, there are beaucoup de Bocuse everywhere around there: Est, Ouest, Nord, Sud, and several others. But the one we decided upon was the Institut restaurant now ensconced in the hotel itself. We've been to L'Ecole in NYC, so we know what a training ground restaurant can bring. But we were willing to chance it and had a very good meal, not withstanding a Polish waitress who had really made what seemed to be a bad career choice (but overseen by a supervisor who made things right repeatedly, with a smoothness that covered her without her becoming even more nervous and unsure). The food was excellent and, although I'd probably try some of the other places before going back, I wouldn't hesitate to return for any reason nor to recommend it to others. Gracious, solid & an altogether fine experience. Again, my note taking was lacking… I was too busy eating and drinking.

Our third dinner of the 3 night stay was at a bouchon called Poelon D'Or. Near the hotel & recommended to us by the concierge when I explained that we were shut out of Au Petit Bouchon Chez George and a couple of other recommended places, this turned out to be the type of old line meal I'd hoped for. Although Quenelles were flying by to every local's table (& I love quenelles), I went for more hearty fare and had tripe and then veal kidneys. I think my wife had duck, but I gotta admit that I was so into what I was eating that I think I might've forgotten to eat some of her food as well. Not only did the experience there make me very happy, but it made me want to try more bouchons, if only to do a thorough investigation for others who may follow.

So… after our stay in Provence (see my Vaison-la-Romaine thread… or don't), we decided to come back to Lyon for a couple of nights. Another happy stay in Le Royal Hotel and 2 more bouchons to try. The first was at Le Saint Cochon and, again, the dinners were thoroughly enjoyed. As they served their quenelle in a rich brown sauce (instead of the crawfish laden white sauce), I had to try it. But not before sampling an array of salads that were available at what would be called a salad bar here in the USA, but was classier than that there. Herring, some pig snout, some tripe, some boiled potatoes, and even a hard boiled egg that was silky and soft inside (no sign of sous vide anywhere). Excellent overview and the quenelle was similarly excellent, although I'm still not sure about the saucing. It worked the way that sometimes a nice white wine can work with meat… not my preference but more than fine to try and enjoy. Overall, my bouchon love was growing.

The last night in Lyon was a Sunday and almost all bouchons were closed except for "restaurant row" Rue des Marronniers, which I had pegged as tourist central and avoided. However, there is a family named Chabert that owns 4 places on this one block strip & they were all open and seemingly friendly. We made reservations for dinner and hoped for the best. As it turned out, our dinner at their Aux Trois Cochons was great. Yes, the block (including their places) is tourist laden and everything is in several languages (including the recipe book we bought from them in English), but at least 50% of the place was filled with locals and visitors from Paris. It gave it a less touristy vibe and it turned out to be a very friendly, homey and sincere place. Here the quenelles were in a full of crawfish sauce and the tastes of everything was top notch. A very professional kitchen, handling a back room of 20 Japanese tourists on one hand, a full main dining room of mixed patronage & an outdoor area with tables eating and drinking… all while keeping a very friendly, almost home kitchen type of ambience going. From the oxtail terrine to the pig's ear salad to the mains, everything was very, very good and I think this wound up being our favorite bouchon of all. Who woulda guessed?

And then, off we went back to Paris (again, separate thread). That's all folks.

Jun 25, 2014
Steve R in France

Brief-ish Report on our time in Paris

Just flew home to Brooklyn & I find I have enough jet lag to write some posts before I forget everything. I'll just note which places we really liked while in Paris on both ends of our 5+ weeks in France trip (3 weeks in Provence & 1 in Lyon/Beaune made up the bulk of it…separate posts intended).
At any rate, an early evening small plates ("tapas") dinner at the bar at Le Bat was excellent (we really liked this place & were grateful to get there for "Happy Hour", having a chance to sit at the bar & chat with the chef while eating). We thought the food to be very well thought out and everything we tried, we liked. And we tried a lot. My opinion: a winner.
Chateaubriand hit all the right notes as well (2nd seating, waited on line till 10:30pm & closed the place down at 1am). We had some apprehension going there, as we did note that several of those we trust on CH seemed to have, at times, thought the food to be a bit tired & the concept played out. However, maybe because we're the newbies, maybe because it was a good night… who knows…everything we had was on target. Nothing remarkable about adding fruit components to each dish, but each was tastier for it and it all held together nicely. I'd go back. Very friendly place as well.
Ze Kitchen Gallerie was fantastic. Again, I was aware that this is not a unanimous choice and that it's not a new place. Although the liberal use of ginger was duly noted (but we both love ginger and think it adds to many dishes), the use of soy seemed minimal to us & each dish was quite good. The blending of Western/Eastern worked for us and avoided the "throw things together and call it 'fusion' syndrome" that we've felt elsewhere. The service by our main waiter was not overly friendly, but he was engagable & knowledgable, taking the time to explain as needed/wanted. The others who put plates in front of us were anxious to scurry off, but that's okay. By the way, there are more staff in that small kitchen than I'd ever seen working. But they seemed almost militarily trained and didn't seem to get in each other's way at all, even when reaching over to get things… we had a great view from our table.
Our lunch at Buvette (hey, had to patronize my home town chef) was lovely & it was nice to see that Thomas (who worked at the Buvette in NYC for Jodi Williams, the main owner/chef) had gotten this place together so well. Nothing extraordinary, but it seems an extremely comfortable place for the neighborhood & the food is fresh and tasty. Chez George (the old line one, on rue du Mail) would be my neighborhood go to place if I could live in a neighborhood like that - wow. I love old style cooking in every region of every country we ever visit & this is a prime example of why. I ordered the herring with potatoes as my entree (appetizer, for those of us here in the USA) & received, without explanation, separate serving bowls of each with enough to feed an army. Not being a total idiot, it didn't take much to figure out that I was free to help myself to as much as I'd like, but that it was not a one portion size serving to be finished. And no glares when I ate enough of it for a small group. Plus, I got to finally eat andouillette here… another food that I (unfortunately) love and that will keep lipitor in business. It was a great consolation that the table of 4 local 40-somethings next to us ate twice as much as we did and yet I weigh more than any 2 of them combined. Unbelievable how much they put away.
I should also add that a lunch at Cafe de la Nouvelle Mairie with a noted, (but unnamed by me) long time famous food blogger and CH'er was nice as well, although I thought the company to be much better than the food. His blog has details & pictures, so enough said. The noise decibel level was good too :-)

Jun 23, 2014
Steve R in France
1

Three Weeks of Eating In & Around Vaison-la-Romaine

Yes, we rented from Jean-Claude & Colette...2 of the best people we've ever met. Thanks for the comments on some of the places, as it's always nice to get some (accurate) backstory on these things. Le Bateleur served us an exceptional meal &, as I said in my post, my expectations were not high going in. Had I known about the local opinion, we might have stuck with our 1st impression, not gone, & missed out. Lucky break.

You have a lovely town & we're thrilled to have chosen it as our base for 3 weeks. Other nice places that I didn't write up but enjoyed were Brin d'Olivier, Belle Etoile & La Lyriste. Very different levels of course, but enjoyed all the same. Thanks for your comments.

Jun 19, 2014
Steve R in France

France: One great meal in Lyon?

Well, I can't weigh in on the "meal of a lifetime" request, but can say (we're in Lyon right now by the way...for the second stay in a month) that Boucuse's Institut in the Royal Lyon is a very nice dinner & he has opened a small empire of places ( Oest, Sud, Nord & Est + a couple of others) that look very good as well. We've concentrated on the Bouchons while here & can re-confirm that even ordering one dish can be very filling, as these are rich hearty foods. My quenelle tonite at Le Saint Cochon (11 rue Laurencin) was in a very rich sauce &, although it was light itself, the overall dish wound up being very filling. A very nice bouchon, by the way. Last month we ate at Poelon D'Or (Ramparts d'Ainay), another very nice Bouchon but, again, I couldn't see eating this food and another meal in the same day. Sort of defeats the purpose of getting this type of hearty fare If you're trying to not get full. But, your call...just remember to check for opening times. A lot of Bouchons close Sat. & Sun.

Jun 14, 2014
Steve R in France

Three Weeks of Eating In & Around Vaison-la-Romaine

Actually, we wound up liking Sablet. Our wine guide Olivier lives there and spent a bit of time in the car talking about it. Then we went for a brocante sale in the town square and wandered around a bit. Very nice.

Jun 14, 2014
Steve R in France

Three Weeks of Eating In & Around Vaison-la-Romaine

Some places stand out as total winners and I'll start with them. Remember, the deal for us during our 3 weeks was to find places within walking distance so that we could easily stumble home after drinking without having to drive. Self limiting perhaps, but there are quite a few good meals to be had in Vaison-la-Romaine...at least in my opinion.

My favorite was a bittersweet situation in that we wanted to go to Le Grand Pre while here (we would call a taxi) but the owner had permanently closed shop to everyone's amazement. Well, we went to Le Bateleur (at the foot of the Roman Bridge) & had a great meal outdoors on their street side terrace. From start to finish, what I thought might be an overpriced set menu turned out higher quality dishes that showed skill in the kitchen & made it a very good deal. During the meal, we were told that some of the wines on the list were out, as they were not replenishing their stock, since this was their last week in business. The owners were consolidating into Le Mesclun, their other place (in Seguret: see above lunch post). Why? Well, the owner of Le Grand Pre had bought the place and would be opening there. As I said, bittersweet. For under $100/person (at 1.4 euros to the dollar?), we ate & drank extremely well and would be telling everyone to go if there was still a place to go to. Hopefully, the new owner will do the site proud. And, hopefully, Le Mesclun will get even better because of the change.

We went to Bistro D'Ou (on the old city side of the Roman Bridge) twice, even though their menu didn't change one bit and there were only 3 choices for each course. And we loved our meals both times. The duck breast main stands out in my memory and, although I won't be idiotic enough to call it the best duck ever (which I sort of remember feeling about the one I had several years ago at Eleven Madison Park, back home in NYC), I gotta say that it was damn good. The fish main was very good as well & we each reversed our orders the 2nd time, having loved the tastes we got from each other the 1st time. The 1st courses and the desserts were both excellent with wine (their wine list is a page of bottles for 20euros, a page for 25euros, a page for 30euros and an above that page - an interesting way to give folks solid choice at standard price points) a strong point as well. Our 25euro selection (a red the first time & a white the 2nd, supplemented by glasses beforehand and drinks after), were all very good. Total price barely hit $150 for the two of us and, to us at least, this represented major value.

The 3rd top meal we had was in a "bio" (same as "organic"?) restaurant called "Le Bonheur Suit Son Cours", run by a husband/wife team (she's been the chef & he front of house for several of their 8 years now; it was the opposite when they started). We both had the "butcher's cut" steak as our main, supplied by the local bio butcher down the block, whom everyone in town (including our landlords) seems to love. The steaks were just about perfect, the apps. & desserts excellent & we gave him permission to choose our wine without telling us what it was (red, reasonably full bodied, was our request) for 40euros or so, and what we drank went perfectly with the food. It was a "Domaine Viret" 2010 Mareotis, which I've never heard of and was charged only 27euros for (I love being down sold). We were worried going in, as it's a small place on a side street and doesn't get much love from TripAdvisor or mention from Michelin...unfounded worries. Go, be friendly & it'll be a very good meal.

More to come...

Jun 13, 2014
Steve R in France

Three Weeks of Eating In & Around Vaison-la-Romaine

Well, I found 2 pictures from the Les Florets lunch. As I said, I don't generally take food pics.

Jun 13, 2014
Steve R in France

Three Weeks of Eating In & Around Vaison-la-Romaine

I will do this in a series of posts so that I can stop to eat & drink...and smell the lavender. We rented an apt. on Chemin Du Couradou for 3 weeks, overlooking the ruins. We leave tomorrow. As anyone who knows us from the NYC Outerborough Boards can attest to, we don't eat at home very often. I mean, why spoil a perfectly good new renovated kitchen, right? But here, with an outdoor terrace off the kitchen, beautiful weather, a great weekly market 3 blocks from our door every Tues. morning & a very, very good cheese shop (Lou Camesteou - Mme. Josiane Deal presiding) 4 blocks from us, who could not wind up eating (& drinking) many lunches and some dinners at home? All that by way of explaining why there aren't going to be 25 restaurant reviews for the 21 days here...well, that plus we don't drink and drive, but we do drink...limits the going out at night somewhat.

First of all, the 2 lunches of note: we walked around Seguret early in the stay but I didn't bring my obsessive listing of recommended restaurants (Michelin & otherwise) with me, figuring we'd only need it for dinners. Well, we stumbled into a place solely due to its drop dead gorgeous outdoor area, overlooking everything. What the hell, we'll get something to eat. Turned out that Le Mesclun was on my list & now we know why. Owned by the same folks who own Le Bateleur in V-la-R (well, until today anyway...more about that in a future post), this was a really nice lunch. Well presented dishes with a very good wine by the glass selection (one glass each), we'd highly recommend it. I even took pics of the food, something I never do...and if I ever find them, I might come back & mention what we ate. Remembered fondly, whatever it was. Similarly, our 2nd mentionable lunch was part of a small group wine tour of Gigondas & C-du-Pape with Olivier Hickman (www.wine-uncovered.com), where he arranged a 4 course wine pairing lunch (36euros/person extra) at Les Florets in Gigondas. Again, I have pictures somewhere but, suffice it to say, this is a good choice for upscale lunching, well worth going. Also was on my Michelin list when I checked it later on. Each of the 4 courses was a winner & they served very nice wines as pairings.

That's it for now. I'm checking my dinner listings & will start on them next. Did I mention the lunches in the apartment with runny cheeses, bottles of good wine, sausages, radishes, tomatoes and greens from the local market, olives (& olive oil) from Nyons, bread from any of our local places & even a pate or two? I have not lost weight & do not want to convert the found kilos to pounds.

Jun 13, 2014
Steve R in France

Please help me decide…everything sounds so good!

As a fellow tourist, if you find yourself without a reservation and need a quick back up plan, we found that getting to Chateaubriand just before 9:30 will get you in to their no reservation second seating fixed dinner after awhile (for us it was an hour or so wait). The line is pleasant and their wine bar next door will sell you glasses of a # of good wines to drink on the street while waiting. We loved the dinner we had, although some on the board may not agree that it's on a must go to list. Another no res. back up plan could be Le Bat, where tapas are the dinner menu and the small plates we ate there were excellent. Gives you great flexibility on time as well.

Jun 12, 2014
Steve R in France

Louro at the moment: review + photos

Hope you didn't look for me again, as this time we're in France & the commute would've been too long. I've already asked Dave to do a 3rd one so that I can actually get to stuff my face too (yeah, "they were small").

Jun 12, 2014
Steve R in Manhattan

3 Nights in Paris - September 2014 - Lunch/Dinner Suggestions

With the upfront admission that I might not know what the hell I'm talking about, I'd recommend Le Bat. We dropped in at 7:30pm or so (way early for a local, but great for tourists (yes, that's what we are) who want to sight see the next morning without not using the hotel bed we paid for) last month and sat at the open kitchen/bar area, talking to the chef and staff. Although it has a set menu at lunch, it's a "tapas" (small plates) evening menu that can cost very little or get up to your limit...prices are very reasonable for the quality of food & wine offered. Seemed modern & inventive to us. We intend to drop by again next Friday eve. before our Sat morning flight home.

Jun 12, 2014
Steve R in France

Corkage in France

Here's my dilemma. I'm constantly told that, in France, much more attention is paid to producing and selecting wine that is meant to go with the food being eaten. Restaurant owners and chefs in NY that I know seem to go out of their way to encourage me to look at the wine as part of my dinner and pick accordingly. So... following that logic, unless I fully believed that the owner of a place could not afford to carry or find a wine I have access to, but that she or he would utilize it if it was possible, I would assume that the wines chosen were as deliberate as any other aspect of the dinner & respect it. Sure, I might mention it once to see if the thought had not occurred to him/her, but not past that. No more than I would bring a different meat to the place ("have you tried making that dish with lamb instead?"). Exaggeration for the sake of CH argument, of course.

Jun 08, 2014
Steve R in France
3

Need Help in Provence foodie itinerary!

Another update. Although Le Grand Prė is indeed closed for good, the owner has bought what is now Le Bateleur in Vaison-la-Romaine. This is the last week for the current ownership of Le Bateleur (where we ate tonite...it was excellent) & they will consolidate into Le Mesclun in Seguret, their other place (where we ate lunch last week...it was also excellent).

Jun 07, 2014
Steve R in France

Di Fara Pizza HORRIBLE

She was also not incorrect with just about any of her facts either. I think her conclusion that the pizza was terrible was based more on the methodology, the equipment and the individual ingredients used than the resulting taste of the product and that's where she and I part ways. If it's fair that the folks who love DiFara have always touted the imported cheeses, the great olive oil and the artisanal nature of his one man show, it is equally fair for someone to fact check and dispel some of the myths and exaggerations. I still stand by the pizza tasting great and that it's one of the best in NYC, but Katie's interest in sourcing the best ingredients is understandable, even if not to my way of thinking.

Jun 06, 2014
Steve R in Outer Boroughs

Di Fara Pizza HORRIBLE

Thank you fattyd (if I may call you that). And, yeah, Katie (whom I've met & has been helpful to me when I've gone to Rome) might've been looking for notoriety here (I'm not sure)... it's enough for me to just say she was incorrect on this. It's actually fun to have noted that Elizabeth Minchilli, another Italy food blogger (by the way, both Katie & Elizabeth are on the CH Italy board pretty regularly) came to Bklyn just before Katie and wrote up DiFara on her Italy blog as great. I'll stick with Eliz. on this.

Jun 06, 2014
Steve R in Outer Boroughs
1

Di Fara Pizza HORRIBLE

I agree with Jen Kalb on this and Bob Martinez is correct (disclosure: Bob & I are friends...not that I wouldn't give him a negative review here anyway :-). I'm a great fan of Di Fara's & have gone there for longer than most posters here have been alive (over 45 years). However, if the pizza is burnt or otherwise not up to measure, he should notice and not serve it...or give it away to whomever might want it anyway. But Dom is far from a saint and he's always had his quirks. Burnt pies, oily pies, small pies (I saw him serve 1/2 size slices to some people for full price that made me blush... he had failed to stretch the dough enough & the resulting pie was small)... he should be more consumer friendly. But he's not. He is who he is and it's a 2 way transaction. I've seen a customer eat some of a slice, pronounce it bad & get her $ back (begrudgingly) from him. It's usually one of the best pizzas in a town full of very good pizza (regardless of what Katie Parla thought), but the man's just that and cults never impressed me as being paradigms of objectivity. Let the posters say what they think & I'll determine who to listen to when I'm hungry.

Jun 06, 2014
Steve R in Outer Boroughs
1