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Glinda's Profile

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30th Birthday - EMP, Annisa, Acme, Dutch (or something else?)

Ah if you'd only come to us a month ago all of those restaurants would have been good choices and relatively easy to get into.

It's your 30th birthday so why not celebrate for the whole month and get a reservation for EMP, Anniss or Acme for later in the month. And I agree with kathryn, the Dutch is too casual and the crowd after 9 pm can be very dicey.

In the meantime try on of the excellent new more casual restaurants for your birthday day. My newest favorite is Empellon Cocina in the East Village. I was quite impressed with its innovative very upscale Mexican-inspired food.

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Acme
9 Great Jones St, New York, NY 10012

Empellon Cocina
105 1st Ave, New York, NY 10003

Feb 29, 2012
Glinda in Manhattan

Dinner for parents - Moneky Bar?

Ah there are so many. My current love is The Beagle in the East Village for the magic it does with food and cocktail pairings and for the way the staff makes everyone feel instantly at home.

But don't tell anyone lest it become a "scene".

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The Beagle
162 Avenue A, New York, NY 10009

Dec 07, 2011
Glinda in Manhattan

Dinner for parents - Moneky Bar?

Monkey Bar would be perfect. It combines Old New York nostalgia with excellent food, flawless service and an adult take on cocktails.

Take this from a 55-year-old "scene hater".

For example ... you won't catch me dead in Dans le Noir ... in *any* city it's in!

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Monkey Bar
60 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022

Dec 07, 2011
Glinda in Manhattan

Any Montreal foods, restaraunt places in manhattan?

Your best bet is definitely M Wells in LIC. The food is superior to Mile End and Fedora. The chef is not merely an alumnus of Au Pied du Cochin. It is Hugue Dufour himself.

Dinner service is available Tuesday thru Thursday. I think it's the only time they take reservations. They now have a liquor licence and are serving beer and wine. Cocktails designed for the food will be added in the next few weeks. Weekend service will take a few months.

The prep space is tiny so they have to figure out how to accommodate 3 meals (2 completely different menus) 6 days a week in a tiny diner kitchen. That's why they've been expanding slowly, "tired" comments to the contrary.

It's a supremely inventive restaurant with riffs on both diner staples an classic Quebecois food..

Plus it's a short commute on the 7 from midtown _

Mar 05, 2011
Glinda in Manhattan

What's wrong with wanting a drink made with vodka? [moved from Boston board]

Funny I like gin bloodies as well.

Mar 05, 2011
Glinda in Spirits

An Astoria List

I agree. Malagueta is one of the best restaurants in Astoria and certainly the best Brazilian restaurants.

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Malagueta
25-35 36th Ave, Queens, NY 11106

Nov 15, 2010
Glinda in Outer Boroughs

For next week- Eleven Madison Park or Del Posto- Birthday dinner

Now *that* is funny!

Nov 15, 2010
Glinda in Manhattan

Where to eat in Little Italy?

I'd like to point out that Eataly is a glaring tourist trap. In fact it was designed as one: a Disneyland/Las Vegas for food.

For any authentic "Old New York" Italian restaurant feel, the outer boroughs are the only place to find that: Brooklyn, Bronx, Staten Island, and Queens. That said, I don't go to any "Old New York" Italian restaurants since my husband can outcook them all.

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Eataly
200 5th Ave, New York, NY 10010

Nov 15, 2010
Glinda in Manhattan

gin versus vodka for bloody mary?

Look at my reply downthread. Your take was more accurate than alanbarnes, and wikipedia ... well let's just say that ... all Internet sources are suspect. Per Dale DeGroff's "The Craft of the Cocktail", the Bloody Mary was indeed invented in one ex-pat American Bar in Paris based on a rival Paris ex-pat American Bar's non-alcoholic tomato cocktail. It was indeed vodka-based. But when it first traveled to America (to the bar at the St. Regis Hotel in NYC) vodka was not available in the US so it was made with gin.

Oh and George Jessel was never a bartender in NY. (I'm still laughing at that one ...)

Jan 09, 2010
Glinda in Spirits

gin versus vodka for bloody mary?

I'll take my cocktail history from an actual bartender rather than from wikipedia or any other Internet source. In Dale DeGroff's "The Craft of the Cocktail", he credits Frank Meier of the Ritz Bar in Paris with the early 1920s creation of a non-alcoholic cocktail (or "mocktail" to use the current terminology) that seasoned crushed tomatoes (DeGroff claims it was the tins of American tomato juice imported to France just after World War I ended, but this is suspect since tomato juice wasn't widely available in this form until the late 1920s) with celery salt and Worchester sauce.

Fernand 'Pete" Petiot at the rival Harry's American Bar took the recipe and added vodka naming it after a regular at the bar who was often "left waiting for her man" (I love that part) nursing Pete's version of Frank's concoction. Now that's the way real bartender's name their drinks: after memorable people in their lives! When it came to American for the first time in 1936 with Pete installed as the head of the St. Regis Bar (still one of the most impressive bars in NYC with that gorgeous mural) vodka was not yet available in the US, so it was made with gin.

So the cocktail has French origins, or, at best, ex-pat "American in Paris" origins ... which is the most satisfying derivation yet. And as an "American drink" it indeed was originally gin.

As for George Jessel ... the only place Georgie Jessel was a bartender was possibly in his palatial Hollywood home. George Jessel was an actor, singer and movie producer. The claim that he "invented" the Bloody Mary was likely a byproduct of the ad campaign in 1956 that he did for Smirnoff Vodka, at that time just being introduced to the US. Though, I understand how that one caught on: for Americans, everything was invented by us and nothing existed (vodka, for instance) before we heard of it. LOL!

Jan 09, 2010
Glinda in Spirits