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Brisket: smoking and their cooking time in different types of smokers

Thanks everyone. My brisket did turn out very good, but next time I'll cook it even lower to increase the cooking time.

I'm still surprised that the thick point gets done well and the flat doesn't dry out. Now I just gotta try some different recipes....

Sep 19, 2011
travisL in Home Cooking

Brisket: smoking and their cooking time in different types of smokers

I'm a newbie in the smoking world, and so naturally I have a few questions.

I'm using a bullet shaped smoker with a water pan with hardwood lump coal. I've done salmon and two briskets (a 3lb flat and a 13lb packers cut that is currently resting in tinfoil wrapped in towels in a cooler as I type).

I've read many forums and threads about smoking meats and I've discovered that my stuff gets done much sooner than what many say is the normal cooking time. For example: I smoked the 13lb brisket at 220-250*F, and it was done with an internal temp of 190*F in under 8 hours. According to what I've read, I should have expected to smoke it for about 1.5 hours per pound, putting it at least upwards of 15 hours.

Do water smokers cook that much faster than an offset one? This leads me to my next question.

Low and slow, right? Well, if I'm reaching the appropriate internal meat temperatures much faster than "normal," will the meat come out much different than if it took twice as long? Should I drop my smoking temperature so I get a longer, slower smoke? Or is brisket done when its done, as someone put it on one of the threads.

Oh, and I've checked my thermometers and they seem to be accurate. Thanks in advance for your help, and I'll let you know how my brisket turned out later tonight!

Sep 17, 2011
travisL in Home Cooking

Copper Jam Basin---other uses?

Hey y'all,
My fiancee got me a Baumalu copper jam basin, or at least I think it's a jam basin. The label says "bassine legere," it's unlined copper, is about 6" high and about 18" across the top.

However, I don't make jams, nor do I have any intention to start. Can this be used for anything else? Roasting pan? Anything?

Thanks for your help!

Dec 25, 2010
travisL in Cookware

Cooking without worry: care of tin in copper cookware

I actually ended up getting an All-Clad stainless saute pan because it was pretty cheap.

Jan 07, 2010
travisL in Cookware

Cooking without worry: care of tin in copper cookware

Paulustrious,
Some very good info, and some allaying of my fears! Thanks!

Jan 07, 2010
travisL in Cookware

Cooking without worry: care of tin in copper cookware

Thanks for the good info David. They are 2mm--i measured with a caliper. I'm sure the Mauviel, Bourgeat, and Falk professional pans are a bit better, but for the amateur casual home chef I am, I'm pretty sure these will be plenty fine for me! Now, do I get the All-Clad Copper Core 10" fry pan for $100, or wait for a good deal on a saute pan....decisions, decisions....

Jan 07, 2010
travisL in Cookware

Cooking without worry: care of tin in copper cookware

Ah, thanks for the clarification.

Jan 06, 2010
travisL in Cookware

Cooking without worry: care of tin in copper cookware

Thanks!
I agree, copper just for boiling water is a waste, but that was mainly to illustrate some of my concerns. I've been leaning toward a SS lined saute pan just to be safe. I also never really thought about the fact that different metals, when placed on a heat source of constant temperature, would reach different temperatures. I knew that it would take different times to reach said temperature, but never considered the metals would produce different temps.

Jan 06, 2010
travisL in Cookware

Cooking without worry: care of tin in copper cookware

Hi all,
My first post here.....
I've been researching copper cookware and its care because I came across a few copper pans at TJ Maxx. They are Baumalu pans, at least 2 mm thick, and are hand-tinned. I got a 2 quart and 5 quart pot for $60 total.
I'm no expert chef, but I did know copper pans were good, so I picked them up on a whim. The Baumalu pans seem to be positively reviewed on this site, but thats another story. This topic has been discussed before here, but I still have questions. I know tin melts around 450 degrees F. I know not to preheat these pans. I know not to use metal utensils. I know to keep the heat around or below medium. What I DO NOT know, is how to use them to their fullest advantages without worrying about damaging the tin. I'd like some solid advice on how to use these pans.

1. If boiling water, can I crank up the heat because the water is absorbing much of the energy? Or will the high heat still damage the pan? I've read about boiling water in a paper cup, so I don't need too many anecdotes on that....

2. Should I avoid tin lined saute pans? These pans are usually used in higher heat cooking, correct? For example, if I have a tin lined copper saute pan, and want to fry a chicken breast, will covering the bottom in oil and adding the chicken be enough to help prevent damage to the tin? Especially since I read here that the sides of pans like these will be almost just as hot as the bottom because of copper's excellent heat distribution.

3. Are electric coil stoves (ah, I hate them, but its all i have right now!) any more dangerous to the copper and tin than flame? Does anyone have general temperature guidelines for electric stoves? Low is about X degrees, Medium is about X degrees, and High is about X degrees? It takes quite some time to boil water in these copper pans on medium heat on my electric stove...

4. Am I over-analyzing and worrying too much? I want these pans to last, but also want to be able to use them for real!

Thanks in advance for your answers!

Jan 06, 2010
travisL in Cookware