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Kohl's Food Networks 7 1/2 inch Santoku Knife with cracked blade

You are right about things like potatoes sticking to highly polished blades, especially if they are wide.
I love the new Food Networks 8 inch chefs knife I just bought. It passes the tomato test with flying colors, that is it will slice a soft tomato without crushing it. I am making sun dried tomatoes right now and have been slicing up about a hundred cherry tomatoes a day. I was using a serrated bread knife, but this new knife is so sharp and the blade shape just right so it works even better.

Aug 24, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Kohl's Food Networks 7 1/2 inch Santoku Knife with cracked blade

Well I returned the knife, Kohl's took it back no questions asked. They even gave me a $10 store credit to make up for the coupon I used when I bought the knife originally.
The drag seemed to be friction when cutting a thick piece of raw beef. The knife supposedly had 33 layers of steel, and you could see the damascus markings. Possibly the drag was due to the indentations that a santoku type knife has. even though they claim that is supposed to cut drag.
I used the store credit and refund to buy another food networks knife, this time their top of the line eight inch silcone handled chefs knife, regular $66 but they had it on clearance for $26.79 so I ended up getting it for $12.77 plus tax after deducting a 15% off coupon and the $10 store credit. Its a really nice knife for $12.77. BTW, I suspect they are discontinuing this line of knives so right now you can get most of them, especially the most expensive ones, half original price or less. They have a lifetime guarantee and what is nice is you don't have to send them back to the manufacturer to make good on it, just bring it in to your local Kohl's.

Aug 24, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Kohl's Food Networks 7 1/2 inch Santoku Knife with cracked blade

I am the original poster. Well my daughter has been using this knife for five months and the crack never got any bigger. However I decided to return the knife for another reason. There seems to be a noticable drag when cutting certain items such as meat. And its not because of the crack. I wonder if anyone else has noticed this drag when cutting using a multilayer knife. BTW, I plan to buy another Food Networks knife to replace it as I bought some other ones and am well satisfied with them, the construction seems excellant, and when they put them on sale I can get them for $17.59, regular price $49.99, or even less if they have a coupon at the time.

Aug 22, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Kohl's Food Networks 7 1/2 inch Santoku Knife with cracked blade

The warranty says I can just return the knife to any Kohl's, don't have to mail it in. BTW, is this a common problem with multilayer knives where the hard brittle core layer cracks or chips? I believe I read of this happening to even high priced Japanese knives if used for heavy duty cutting.

Mar 25, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Kohl's Food Networks 7 1/2 inch Santoku Knife with cracked blade

I just bought one of these knifes, regular price supposed to be $79.99, on clearance for $31.99, and I had a $10 off coupon and a 20% off coupon so it ended up costing me $17.59 plus tax. It is supposed to be made of 33 layers of Damascus stainless steel. But when I got home and took it out of the package I noticed a very small crack in the cutting edge, which was probably just the middle hardened steel ply, about a quarter inch long. It was the last one so I can't exchange it but I can get my money back. But my daughter saw it and wanted it, even with the crack as it appears to be super sharp and otherwise well made. I decided to keep it since I don't think I will ever get another one so cheap. I figure if the crack does get bigger I can always return it under the lifetime warranty, and in the meantime my daughter gets to use a much better knife than any other she has. How long do you think the blade will last with a hairline crack in the inner plies of the knife?

Mar 24, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Enamel inconsistencies on the interior of my new Staub

That is why I almost never buy anything online or mail order. I want to be able to inspect it before I buy it, or else if that is impracticable to be able to immediately return it at a local store if I find something defective without the hassle and risk of shipping it back.

Jan 16, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Oven doesn't light but burners work.. any thoughts?

The interior of the oven gets to be around a hundred degrees with the oven door shut, due to the pilot light, and by propping the door open a bit I can lower the temp to around 80 or 90 which is just perfect for sprouting pepper and tomato seeds. But once they start sprouting I move the seedling under my fluorescent light fixture until it gets warm enough to move them outside.

Jan 14, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Oven doesn't light but burners work.. any thoughts?

Many pilot lights have a safety feature that shuts off the gas supply if the pilot blows out in the case of a gas pilot light or if the electronic ignitor doesn't light the gas. It works by a bimetallic element being heated by the flame.

Jan 14, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

What sound does your knife blade make when you thump it? Please report back.

I am trying to determine if one can get an idea about the quality of the steel in a knife blade by thumping it on the side with your finger and listening for what sound it makes. On my own knives the ones I consider the best quality make a singing or ringing sound when thumped, whereas the cheapest ones generally have a dull thud sound, but there are a few exceptions, maybe a lot depends on the type of handle attached. or the thickness of the spine. If you have an assortment of knives including good ones and junk ones, would you thump them and report back if there is any difference in the sound they make.

Jan 14, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Oven doesn't light but burners work.. any thoughts?

I have a gas oven that was installed when the house was built in 1964 that uses a gas pilot light and it is still going strong, never a single repair.. New technology in many cases is less reliable than old. My mother had a GE refrigerator that was 45 years old and had run continuously for the entire time. The only repair it ever needed was to replace the rubber door gasket. I left it in the house when I sold it, so I don't know if it would still be running today.

Jan 14, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Does a Sharpening Steel Ever Go Dull?

I don't believe a magnetic steel would be any better than a non-magnetic steel. The only use I can see for making it magnetic would be to collect any steel filings, which depending on you point of view would be a good or bad thing.

Jan 13, 2010
lazycook in Features

seeking rice cooker advice

Since these rice cookers only shut off after all the water is boiled off, wouldn't something like oatmeal turn into a dried out solid lump?

Jan 12, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Durian

Durian is too expensive in the U.S., its even expensive to buy in Thailand. The cheapest place I found to buy it is Sri Lanka. I lived there for a year and had my own Jackfruit, Tamarind, and Guava trees growing in my yard, together with Banana plants.
I don't know why people are saying take a shower after coming near a Durian, it doesn't make you smell. It does have a strong sulfur taste, but you also develop a craving for it after you get used to it.

Jan 12, 2010
lazycook in General Topics

Pizza To End All Pizza Discussions

Any toppings other than Italian sausage and mushrooms is a travesty. And they should use thick tomato paste, not watery tomato sauce, and real Mozzarella cheese. Don't skimp on the tomato paste.

Jan 12, 2010
lazycook in General Topics

seeking rice cooker advice

A Korean friends says she uses a pressure cooker for brown rice and a rice cooker for white rice. But rice is so easy to cook in a regular pot so why go to the expense of a fancy computer controlled rice cooker unless you eat rice everyday like many Asians.

Jan 12, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

8" Chef's knife - $30 Henckel or $130 Shun?

Just buy the Sunday newspaper. They almost always have a coupon in there. They issue so many coupons it a wonder anyone ever buys anything at their regular price, which is usually higher than discount stores.

Jan 11, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

The Last Knife Sharpener You'll Ever Need

You can buy a cheap belt sander for $40 that will probably sharpen better and faster than anything else you can find in its price range. But you will have to order a 220, 600, and 1200 grit belt from some specialty online seller (search for abrasive belts), as your local hardware store or Lowes or Home Depot will only carry coarse belts. There are a lot of videos on the internet that show you how to sharpen using a belt sander,
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf...

Jan 09, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Any opinions on best cheap knife brands and models under $30.

Please no $130 knives, just ones that one can typically buy on sale for $30 or less (and someone almost always has a sale on knives). In particular, I just bought a Chicago Cutlery Santoku on sale for less than $20 and a Kitchen Aid for less than $10, and a three piece Cusinart paring knife set for under $10, any opinions on these brands. I actually have two Kitchen Aid Santoku knives, both identical size but the pro series blade is thinner and sings when thumped, instead of the dull thud I get when thumping the blade of the cooks series. BTW, is the sound a blade makes when thumped with your finger indicative of the quality of the steel in the blade?

Jan 07, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

bread knife sharpening

I wonder if a Dremel mototool would work. You can buy all sorts of abrasive tips for it, one of them might be the right size to fit into the scalloped edge indentations. I use one for sharpening my chain saw blades.

Jan 07, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Anyone use a belt sander for sharpening knives?

My grandfather used to have a great big grinding wheel about three inches thick and two feet in diameter that you pumped on a foot pedal to turn. I bet that would work really good on some of these fancy knives. Don't know what happened to it. How big are the motorized waterstones, and are they flat or round?

Jan 07, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Anyone use a belt sander for sharpening knives?

Here is a link to a video on how to sharpen a knife using a belt sander. Note how quick and easy. You can also make convex edges on knives by keeping the belt a little loose so the belt bends slightly around the edge of the knife blade. There are lots of videos and articles about using a belt sander to sharpen a knife if you search for them.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLjFjT...

Jan 07, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Anyone use a belt sander for sharpening knives?

I tried using my grinding wheel for sharpening knives with poor results, wouldn't try it on an expensive knife. But a belt sander is another story, so easy to use, and if you use a high quality fine grit belt there is very little chance of ruining a knife even on your first attempt. But the belt sander I am talking about is the three wheel bench models that have part of the belt unsupported by a backing plate, not the two wheel portable models one would use for sanding wood. I think a belt sander would pay for itself if you can avoid sending your knives out to be professionally sharpened, someone said they charge a dollar an inch. And if you send your knives out just the time it takes to drive to the sharpeners shop, drop off the knife, drive home, and repeat when time to pick it up is more time than you would spend sharpening half a dozen knives every month for a year. And you can put any shape or any angle on your blade you want. An assortment of medium priced knives kept sharp by sharpening them whenever they needed it would probably cut better than a collection of super expensive knives sharpened only once a year.
Plus you can use the belt sander for tasks like sharpening garden tools, lawn mower blades, chisels, etc. My belt sander also has a built in disk sander.
I would like to know what kind of machine professional knife sharpeners use, or even the factory. Every video I have ever seen on knife making they used a belt sander for sharpening the knives. I would guess a high production knife factory would have some special automated machine. I really can't see a bunch of elderly Japanese men craftsmen hand sharpening knives on a water stone. Maybe final touch-up, but not the main sharpening.

Jan 07, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Best knife sharpener??

Buy a 1 inch by 30 inch or 1 inch by 42 inch or 2 inch by 42 inch belt sander and sharpen like the pros do. It is so fast and easy it is unbelievable. But you will have to search for the right belts, you won't find them in Home Depot or Sears. Get a 220 grit, 600 grit, and 1200 grit belt. You can also get a leather belt and jewelers rouge for polishing and honing. If your knives are already pretty sharp you might just need the 1200 grit belt. You can put any angle on the blade you want, not just what some manufacturer decided on. With coarser belts you can also sharpen lawn mower blades or sand metal or wood.
There are a lot of videos on the internet that show you how to sharpen with a belt sander.

Jan 06, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Anyone use a belt sander for sharpening knives?

Once I have all my knives sharpened after that all I use is the 1200 grit belt, so it just takes two passes which takes less than a minute to sharpen a knife. Using the very fine grits its pretty hard to ruin a knife blade unless you are trying. The tips can burn if you are not careful but there is a video that some guy made that shows a trick move you make just at the end of the pass that sharpens the tip just right. Anyway, I doubt any home sharpening machine can sharpen a tip any better than a belt sander if at all. If you need more than one or two passes to sharpen a knife either wait between passes or dip the knife in water after each pass to keep it cool.
I never tried sharpening a Japanese three layer knife, but I don't think there is any steel harder than silicon carbide or zirconia grit. The 3M Trizack belts are really good and last a long time and have a special super uniform grit embedded all through the belt. You can even get diamond belts but they cost a small fortune.

Jan 06, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Have I been poisoned by the copper pot I just bought?

The sides on this pot are not straight up and down, instead the widest part is about half way up, with the bottom and the lid end about an inch smaller in diameter. That is why I think the pot was spin formed, as it couldn't be just stamped out like that. The grooves are very shallow, just enough so you can see many microscopic but evenly spaced lines, concentric circles on the bottom. The pot lid is very heavy too.
As I said, I have already removed the interior stain with barkeepers helper and a steel wool pad. So I guess the concensus is this pot is safe to use?
BTW, one can buy 96% tin, 4% silver solder for $61 a pound or $6.40 an ounce. Has anyone ever tried re-tinning a pot themselves?
I searched through several copper pot sellers websites and don't see a single pot that looks like this one so I am guessing it must have been a very rare expensive brand. All the ones I see have straight sides or uniformly tapered sides, not convex sides like this pot has.

Jan 06, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Have I been poisoned by the copper pot I just bought?

I should clarify my original post. I don't feel sick after eating the food. I just want to know if I should stop using this pot because after the first time I used it part of the interior tarnished to a rainbow, color, mostly blue-violet when I left some of the food sitting in the pot for several hours. Is this a sign of a defective coating? As I said, I bought this pot in a thrift shop used, although it looked like it had only been used a few times. Has anyone else ever had the stainless steel or tin coating turn to a blue-violet color after using a pot. The handles appear to be brass, and the rivits stainless. Could this be a silver coated pot, since silver sometimes turns a blue-violet color. The pot does look like it was expensive. There is also a frying pan that looks like it came from the same manufacturer still in the thrift shop also for $10, but one side is dented in, which makes me think it is a soft metal like copper. It looks like it could be easily straightened out with a rubber mallet, but would that damage the coating? Should I buy it too or stay away?

Jan 06, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Anyone use a belt sander for sharpening knives?

I read a couple of threads on sharpening knives and didn't see any mention of using a belt sander to sharpen knives. I know if you go to most websites about making custom knives they all seem to use a belt sander to shape and sharpen the knives they are fabricating.
Well I bought a used 1 inch by 30 inch belt sander for $18 and an assortment of different grit belts to go with it for $25. It is amazing how fast one can sharpen a knife with a belt sander, less than a minute. You can start with a 220 grit for a knife in bad shape and finish it with a 1200 grit for a polished edge. The thing that slows you down is changing the belts to progressively finer grits, but if you do a whole batch using the same grit and then the next, and so forth that belt changing time becomes a minor part of the whole process. Finish up with a few swipes of a sharpening steel to remove the wire edge.
I can also use it for sharpening lawn mower blades and machetes.

Jan 06, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Is a warranty on stainless steel pots/pans important?

Probably a lot depends upon who makes good on the warranty, do you have to pay shipping, will the company still be in business, will the receipt fade if printed with disappearing ink like many do, will you save the receipt and warranty papers for your entire life, etc. I returned a water heater I bought when I read the fine print on the warranty that said if it failed I had to remove the water heater myself, ship it from California to Tennessee at my own expense for them to inspect it, and if they decided it was a warranty defect pay to have the repaired water heater shipped back to me. It would cost as much to ship it as I could buy a new water heater for.

Jan 06, 2010
lazycook in Cookware

Have I been poisoned by the copper pot I just bought?

Yesterday I bought a used pot in a Goodwill thrift shop for $10 that I thought was a copper coated on the outside stainless steel pot, but after reading about copper pots on this board I now think it is a stainless steel or tin lined copper pot, as it is very heavy for its size. There is no brand name on it. The pot seems to have been made by spinning as the interior has small grooves in it, and looks high quality by its intricate design and construction.
My worry is I cooked a mixture of broccoli, carrots, and snap peas in it and ate about half of it and left the rest sitting in the pot for several hours. When I looked at it later the interior of the pot had turned a blue violet color where it was in contact with the vegetables. What could this be, and is it poisonous and should I throw this pot out?
The exterior of the pot also is covered with what I think is lacquer. I scrubbed the pot with barkeepers friend and a steel wool pad and got the violet colored tarnish off the inside and most of the lacquer off. I also tried to burn the lacquer off by putting the empty pot on the stove with the gas turned up high but quickly shut it off when the outside copper part of the pot started to turn blue violet colored too.
Is what happened normal and does one have to season copper pots, or maybe is the coating on the inside too thin, although I can't see any copper showing on the inside?

Jan 06, 2010
lazycook in Cookware