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I Hate My Gas Grill, and Use It All the Time

An additional note, the side "flaps" on the grill lift up for additional charcoal if needed, and no more propane is necessary to get that cherry red and nicely ashed very quickly.

Jun 15, 2012
grammywheels in Features

I Hate My Gas Grill, and Use It All the Time

I love my Weber "performer" grill, which burns real charcoal which is started by 5 minutes of propane burning underneath it. A one quart bottle of propane provides 15-20 starts, fires up the charcoal nicely and then another 20 minutes for the charcoal to burn fiercely, just enough time for me to prep my meal of choice for the grill...This is the best of both worlds...and I also drive a stick shift...LOLOL

Jun 15, 2012
grammywheels in Features

Where should I get a gift card from for an advanced home baker w/ limited supplies?

www.kingarthurflour.com A bakers delight!!!!!

Jun 08, 2012
grammywheels in Cookware

Nashua area news?

Was at yoshimama this week and couldnt have asked for more, even the background music worked perfectly. Everything from decor to the menu is simple, sleek and nicely done...Can't wait to have another meal there.

Apr 13, 2012
grammywheels in Northern New England

Easy New England Clam Chowder

From A New Englander, born and bred: No bacon, salt pork is less intrusive, No garlic, just onion, thyme is allowed, russet potatoes for their starch for thickening, no flour!!!! makes it pasty,,if you feel the need for thicker chowder, use arrowroot for a thicker and very silky result, and you will probably not need any salt. A nice grind of fresh black pepper is wonderful, one of the very few times I use black pepper in a white food. KEEP CLAM CHOWDER PURE!!!

Mar 17, 2012
grammywheels in Recipes

Mark McClusky's DIY American Cheese

I definitely get this!! First, sodium citrate and carrageneen are naturaly occuring substances not "chemicals" the citrate is found most often in citrus and the carageneen is an extract of Irish Moss (sea weed)..with this recipe you are creating a natural version of American Cheese, the purchased variety is far from natural and contains no cheese. It is made of milk, milk fat, whey, milk protein concentrate, whey protein concentrate and salt and who knows what chemicals are added. In the US it cannot be sold as cheese, but as Processed Cheese Food" Now having this recipe I would definitely opt for this..which is how American Cheese was originally made.

Feb 16, 2012
grammywheels in Recipes

Family foods I thought was normal

This might be the weirdest thing of all..as a New Englander I have never seen nor eaten an oyster out of a can although my mother would sometimes add fresh oysters to an herbed bread stuffing for a turkey.

Jan 30, 2012
grammywheels in General Topics

What did I do wrong? Homemade chicken stock

I doubt it would be gizzards creating an off taste, but it could very well be the liver, which never should be included in stock. I often make a fine stock using just gizzards and hearts which are
a great bargain at the market. I havent seen mention in any post about roasting your stock ingredients prior to simmering, perhaps I missed it. But the finest, richest, most flavorful stocks are created when all the ingredients, bones, skin, bits and pieces of the carcass and gizzard and hearts are roasted along with vegetable bits in a 350* oven for at least an hour or 2 before putting in the stock pot even if they are from an already roasted bird, For veg, use the base of a bunch of celery, carrots, onions and their skins, garlic unpeeled, parsley stems etc (no need to dice...largish chunks are fine), when it is all deep brown and crispy place them in your stock pot, cover with COLD water add a few peppercorns and deglaze the roasting pan and add those drippings, bring just to the boil and keep it at the barest simmer for at least 12 hours, uncovered. Strain once through a coarse sieve and again through a cheescloth or coffee filter to clarify. This should result in a clear, deep brown, richly flavorful stock

Jan 07, 2012
grammywheels in Home Cooking

Nashua area news?

With all the talk of Whole Foods finally making an appearance in Nashua area, wouldnt surprise me at all if Green Grocer isnt dragging their feet intentionally....to see what is really going to happen...my gut feeling is that Whole Foods would crush Green Grocer and throw them into the compost pile

Jan 07, 2012
grammywheels in Northern New England

A New Beans Thread

I am another bean lover..I could live on them. A couple of suggestions which are favorites in this kitchen..White Bean (preferably cannellini) Risotto, classic Tuscan comfort food. My variation of Cuban Black Beans and RIce..Serve the black beans over Basmati rice, spoon over a nice fruity Salsa, I use a peach or mango salsa, to taste and top with a good quality shredded cheddar.

Dec 30, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

What in the world do I do with a leftover cooked half of a 6 pound roasted loin of pork?

LoMein is the glorious end of many leftovers in this kitchen.

Dec 30, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

Half pound of ground pork, what to make?

I second ants on a tree!!!! You can feed at least 4 people with half a pound of ground pork that way and they will be beating down the door begging for more.

Dec 29, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

Family foods I thought was normal

All these wonderful things are not in the least "weird" just cultural diversity. I grew up in northern New England in traditional Italian family, My mother adopted and adapted many traditional recipes of the region and also served us many traditional Italian dishes. We had lambs head and polenta and lobster stew and boiled dinners. The one thing I now find fascinating is that so many of my mothers italian dishes, especially the frugal meals, pasta carbonara for example, are now considered "gourmet specialties" and demand quite a price at restaurants. But for most of the "weird" foods served in families, there are quite logical reasons of how they evolved from the many cultures which have mixed and melded over the generations. Buttering bread for sandwiches served the purpose of sealing the bread so it did not absorb juices from meat or tomatoes, etc. and become a gooey mess before being eaten. Try it, it works...Food and cultural anthropology are fascinating studies and worth doing some reading on the topic.

Dec 29, 2011
grammywheels in General Topics

Costco food finds - 4th quarter 2011 [old]

Hadnt seen that yet in MB, but was pleased to find the 1# jar of both beef and chix Organic Better than B yesterday at Costco Nashua. Nice price too.

Nov 08, 2011
grammywheels in Chains

Costco food finds - 4th quarter 2011 [old]

Pacific disappeared for a while in Costco, NH..but is now back along with the Kirkland.

Oct 28, 2011
grammywheels in Chains

Applesauce questions

Consider cooking your apples in the oven, 350*F until nicely cooked, if peeled and cored they can simply be mashed to the consistency you like. Can also be cut into sixths with core and skin still in place and run through a food mill when done. I have found that baking evaporates the excess moisture and makes an apple sauce with good body and flavor and concentrates the natural sweetness... no sugar required. Macouns also make a beautifully pink applesauce when roasted.

Oct 26, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

**Austrian*** White bean/ham soup (?)

The most common bean soup I can recall being served during the many years I lived in Germany and Austra was usually referred to as Serbischebohnensuppe (Serbian Bean Soup) made with canellini beans (white kidney beans), smoky bacon, onions and paprika, bay, lard, flour marjoram, S&P, and beef stock...and a splash of vinegar, there are many slight variations in online recipes, as with most traditional dishes. It is definitely worth eating!!!

Oct 14, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

what are you canning this year?

peach salsa sounds wonderful..how did you process it? Just getting through the strawberry jam..things are ready a lot later here in northern New England, next up..blueberries and then peaches.

Jul 11, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

Why are pine nuts so FREAKING EXPENSIVE?!

when I was a child there was no such thing as pine nuts already removed from their shells and as the youngest in the family it became my chore..It was tedious, painful and seemed to take hours for each cup of the tiny things....I have never minded paying for a machine or someone to do that work for me, I pay the price gladly..and Costco does have an excellent deal on them.

Jun 22, 2011
grammywheels in General Topics

Please Pass the Scavenged-Bone Soup

I agree that throwing left over bones/carcasses into a pot of waer and boiling does not make a decent stock..BUT...take that same carcass and put it in a slow oven for two or three hours, along with carrot, onion (skins included) the base of a stalk of celery, perhaps a couple of garlic cloves also unpeeled, peppercorns and whatever other odds and ends you can find. Roast until things look as if they are close to being dessicated then put them in a stockpot...cover with water and simmer very slowly..never letting them boil, for another few hours..and you will have an incredibly rich, flavorful deep brown stock that will be soup perfection. Strain through a sieve and again through cheesecloth, to clarify then season to taste and refrigerate or freeze until needed.

Apr 17, 2011
grammywheels in Features

How to Grow Herbs Indoors

Over the years I have had success growing herbs indoors....after I learned to consider how each one grows in its native habitat. Rosemary,for instance thrives in a mediterranean climate; hot and dry in summer with cooler wetter winters. When I bring those plants in to winter over they go to cool spot with a southern exposure and are watered much more frequently than they would be outdoors in the summer, to stay constantly moist but not overly wet. If you are fortunate to live in an area with mild winters they will overwinter nicely outdoors, USDA zone 7 or above, in zones 5&6 an enclosed sunporch which does not drop below 20-30 degrees can provide a good environment for them also..in cooler zones they definitely must come inside for the winter..they can take some frost and even snow but the roots will not survive a hard freeze. Cherville is a cool weather crop, and even in northern areas will die back in hot weather and is by nature not a long lived plant. some herbs, like tarragon, most thymes and oregano require a period of winter dormancy and can be left outside into the early winter and then brought in. Basil is definitely a warm weather plant while parsley is a biennial which grows through the winter in milder climates and sets seed the second year..it also will do nicely in an enclosed porch where temperatures hover in the 30 degree range. Within each of these species, there are many varieties, some of which will do better than others. Light also is a major consideration when growing herbs indoors..windows, even a south facing window, will block out a great deal of the UV rays which plants need for photosynthesis. The larger the leaves of a plant (like basil as opposed to thyme) the more UV it will absorb. The most important thing to remember is to "think" about what a plant experiences in its native habitat.

Apr 17, 2011
grammywheels in Features

The Good Loaf in Milford NH--now open for retail business

Thought this needed an update..BEST BREAD in NH..without a doubt!!!! seeded grissini to die for, the olive bread is heavenly, as is everything else..and she is gradually adding more and more exquisite pastries...Call ahead if you want something special, not every item is available every day and things sell out quickly..c'mas eve day I thought I would run in for just one baguette to round out my meal and at 8AM they were already sold out!! As Michelin would say..."worth a detour"!!!!!

Mar 20, 2011
grammywheels in Northern New England

under-used treasure or garbage? what ingredient do you think people are wasting?

Glad to see this thread still growing...has anyone touched on the subject of what we call "garbage soup"??? Peels and trimmings of almost any vegetable, preferably organic since pesticides are most often retained in the skin or near the surface. Garbage soup is basically a vegetable broth..simmering almost daily on the slow burner of the stove and into which all veg peelings and scraps of that day, well washed, are added. Refrigerated overnight and restarted the following day, strained, then used as a base for soup at the end of each week... or cooked down to concentrate it and frozen for later use. And dont forget pea pods, slow simmered and then pureed and strained, they make, with the addition of some cream, a soup which is the essence of fresh peas.

Mar 08, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

under-used treasure or garbage? what ingredient do you think people are wasting?

Try those rosemary branches as skewers also, especially for lamb kebabs!

Mar 08, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

under-used treasure or garbage? what ingredient do you think people are wasting?

And dont forget fish frames/bones for a fumet/broth to add that extra something to chowders and soups.

Mar 08, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

under-used treasure or garbage? what ingredient do you think people are wasting?

here on the coast of New England we also use cod cheeks AND tongues..battered and deep fried they are even better than scallops...and every part of the lobster is used also..tomalley on crackers or crostini or croutons which can be floated on a bowl of lobster stew/chowder for an elegant garnish...shells and miscellaneous parts sauteed in butter, crushed and seived then used as an enrichment to sauces and stocks..those poor inlanders who dont have access to these things have my deepest sympathies.

Mar 08, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

under-used treasure or garbage? what ingredient do you think people are wasting?

Old saying..forgive the sexist bent, but it is old....."A man is only as rich as his wife is frugal"

Feb 11, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

under-used treasure or garbage? what ingredient do you think people are wasting?

If you happen to run out of culinary uses for whey...it is an excellent supplement for plants...as are various forms of vegetable cooking waters.

Feb 11, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking

Food Culture in Boston (or lack thereof)

And that is the crux of the matter..taste is different..and different is neither good nor bad, simply different. Often taste is not slmply a gastronomic sensation. The ambience, people with whom you are dining and where you are dining all affect that sensation..before you continue bemoaning the lack of food culture in Boston, look to yourself and be certain that your feelings about being in Boston, as opposed to the other areas in which you have lived and which you extol, are not coloring your opinions. "Bloom where you are planted (or transplanted)" as the case may be

Jan 18, 2011
grammywheels in Greater Boston Area

Most Creative Polenta

I cannot remember what my grandmother called this version of polenta, but it was an accompaniment to all hearty soups, especially in cold weather. I just call it baked polenta and I dont have a precise recipe. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Generously grease a 9 inch pie plate with good olive oil. Put 3-4 cups polenta in a mixing bowl and season liberally with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Mix the polenta with boiling water until it is smooth and pourable..the consistency of a medium to thick white sauce perhaps. Put the polenta into the prepared pie plate and drizzle with a bit more olive oil and bake until it is brown and crispy, top and bottom and can easily be lifted with a spatula. Cut into wedges and serve with your soup or stew. It is crunchy on the outside and creamy on the inside. Ultra simple and ultra satisfying. Polenta also makes great croutons for a salad..cooked and chilled, cubed, dusted with flour and sauted in olive oil or butter.

Jan 15, 2011
grammywheels in Home Cooking