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Best method to reheat pork tenderloin and not overcook it?

Hi Greygarious I know exactly what you mean that is why Caroline1's tip is so valuable - it works and there is no way you can tell that the meat has has been reheated - try it. It is simple and easy.

Dec 03, 2013
JohnMich in Home Cooking

Best method to reheat pork tenderloin and not overcook it?

We tried this last night with a piece of left over roast veal shoulder. It worked perfectly. There was none of that slightly off taste by which we could always tell if roast meat had been reheated. Thank you Caroline it is a brilliant tip. It took about 35 minutes at 145C to come up to the temperature we wanted.
After your remark about the taste of the lettuce of course we had to try it and it was very tasty, Next time we will use more where this time we only used three large outer leaves.

Dec 03, 2013
JohnMich in Home Cooking

Why do chinese restaurants insist on having "secret" Chinese menus their English-Speaking customers can't decipher?

It is all about price. Identical dishes will be cheaper on the Chinese menu. It is standard operating procedure here in Oz, on the Gold Coast, Queensland where, the Malay and Japanese restaurants in the tourist trap areas do exactly the same thing. It is not just the Chinese.
However ever there is a twist - at least two Japanese testaurants I am aware of through my son working as a waiter during uni vacs had HIGHER prices for the Jap toursist.

Sep 13, 2012
JohnMich in General Topics

How to fry bacon?

Hi Rworange!
As an Aussie it took me a long time to waked up to why American salad recipes always talked about CRISP bacon. It is because the US is as far as I know the only place in the world that normally cooks its bacon until crisp. My Dad taught me to cook the bacon until the fat was translucent. You put the rashers in the pan, after cutting the rinds off, a cast iron one for preference, so that the bacon on each rasher rested on top of the fat on the rasher below it. The whole lot got turned over just once. The bacon was ruined if it was crisp, it was perfect if the fat was translucent and the bacon meat stiffened with occasional brown spots where it was cooked more than the rest. The rendered fat was used to fry the eggs. The eggs were cooked sunny side up and still runny yoked. People who did not like any runny egg white were catered for by splashing the hot fat over the top of the egg until the white was completely cooked. Turning an egg over to complete the cooking met with rebukes.
I know I did not answer your question but I thought you might be interested in how other places do it.
Regards, John

Sep 02, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

I do. That's what scales are for. To get it right.

Jul 29, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Hi Stout.
You got lucky I only found out about this site yesterday when trying to find a substitute for aleppo pepper. I only needed two teaspoons, duh!
http://www.foodsubs.com/

Jul 29, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Yes Sandy I do live somewhere exotic. It's called Australia. Paulj is quite correct and thanks. But there is a bit more to it than that. From your posts you seem very interested in things generally so ...Australia is by 713 sq. miles in land area bigger than the USA not counting Alaska. But its population 3 million less than Texas at around 22.6 million. Population density of the US is 83 people/sq. mile, Oz 7.8! Its generally closer to the equator than the US and does not have any significant areas where any snow lasts in the streets for more than an hour - and even that is infrequent.
Limes are seasonal needing cold winters to fruit properly. So with the lack of cold places and very small population limes are very expensive off-season.

We live on the Gold Coast, Queensland and it's into winter - the temperature at nights is plummeting down to 10C (50F) but the days are a glorious 23-24C (73-75F) and brilliant sunny skies.
Limes abound at the moment because its quite a bit colder south of us, and can be got at 40c each where off season they can be $1 (AU$ ~ US$). So that's why I buy in season and preserve the juice and freeze some rinds. With Asian dishes particularly Thai being a regular at our place (most Chinese restaurants have been supplanted by Thai and Vietnamese), we go through about 3 litres (~100 US fl.ozs) of juice a year so buying well is important.

And if you are ever thinking of an exotic holiday place forget Florida or California,come to Queensland "Beautiful one day - perfect the next!

Jul 24, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

You are so right about that, Almond Tree. My feeling is that no-one who has not tried the recipe should be allowed to comment. Some sites I notice now ask the question 'have you made this?' It is not liar proof but it is a start.

Jul 24, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

Metric measures

Certainly that can be very helpful, Sunshine, but the catch is that it does not say anything about how well an item is packed into the measure. For example a cup of brown sugar can be quite difference in how much sugar that is depending on whether it is just poured in, tapped down by tapping the cup on the work bench or pressing it down tight. Only weights can say for certain what the cook really meant. And the real point of that is that if the recipe tells you the weight then you don't need the conversion. That's why most metric recipes tell you the weight of the dry ingredient - it makes things much simpler.

Jul 22, 2012
JohnMich in Site Talk

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Eh? Wot?

Jul 20, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Spot on, John. It is not that minor either. It is the same category as a large onion or medium tomato. Such measures are meaningless. As someone wisely pointed out much earlier in this thread my large potatoes may be a lot smaller or larger than your large potato therefore a reference to a large potato has no useful meaning without a reference to the weight of the prepared product.

Jul 20, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Why not just use saved lime juice instead of buying yet another product or is that too simple?

Incidentally on the question of usage of Chow.com I just looked up Alexa.com and 1/3rd (33% rounded) of Chowhound vistors are from metric measure countries ie. all the world except the US, Liberia and Burma. I reckon that is enough for Chow management to think about, dont you?
But then again people from metric countries who look up US measure cookery sites are pretty dab hands at converting to their measures so perhaps it doesn't really matter that much anyway.

Jul 20, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

Metric measures

That is not correct. People outside the US would not, unless faced with a real problem eg. their scales just broke, would ever consider using a cup as a measure of dry ingredients unless they had looked up a table of equivalents listed by ingredient for exactly the reason you state, and just as you did in your example, with the probable exception of flour because it is such a common baking measure.
However that being said that it is a long stretch to saying that every recipe needs testing. That was just thrown in to add a pseudo intelligent obstacle to a common enough practice. Virtually all recipes which are converted using rounded conversions work perfectly well because the variations are so slight as to be inside the variations caused by the care of the cook in measuring anyway.
Incidentally I have just seen that according to Alexa.com 1/3 (33%) of Chow site visits are by people from metric measure countries ie. ex US, Liberia and Burma.

Jul 20, 2012
JohnMich in Site Talk

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Even better would be to squeeze the limes and save the juice so you can use the real thing instead of spending more money on a different product. Your use of vinegar instead of lime juice has my taste buds cringing.

Jul 20, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Kris, that is a great recipe and I think using ginger snap instead of the graham cracker style biscuits is a top idea. Next on my list of things to try because the bloke next door makes his own limoncello so nothing to buy.

Jul 18, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Mimi, I find that off-season limes are so expensive if attainable at all but are so often necessary for Asian recipes (particularly Thai) that buying limes when cheap is a necessity. Having juiced them freezing as icecubes does not really work because the flavouring oils evaporate off. Solution - put an airline miniature of vodka into the lime juice (750 ml) bottle and keep it tighly corked in fridge. If all else fails drink it and drown your sorrows.

Jul 18, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Sarcastic? Who, moi? Not sarcasm just a breath of truth. It might not be quite as I said but far, far too many come up with things like 2 tsp of Grand Marnier as a vital component. The last time I had GM I bought it duty free and it did not last that long anyway - but too dear to buy to get two tsps- or just guzzle. If they said but substitute a 1 1/2 tsp of common brandy and 1 tsp of grated orange rind (picked from anywhere on the tree !) as a substitute I would have a lot more respect for them. All I do now is look at their recipes and go and find similar by a non-whacker.

PS: The brandy trick works!

Jul 17, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Spot on! I watch in wonderment as the splash of wine is half a bucket and a pinch of someting else looks more like a handful. Then they ooh! aah! over a decent looking result put together by some offline lackey who took twice as long to cook it as the touted time.
IMHO the majority of celebrity chefs are frauds and could not cook a decent meals = to what a good home cook does
PS: Particularly the whackers who introduce to a fairly basic recipe an ingredient that comes from base camp on Everest picked by a lefthanded Sherpa at midnight on May Day - just to make it exotic. Substitute 1/2 teaspoon of shredded iceberg lettuce. Geez!

Jul 17, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

Metric measures

I Australia a zucchini is a zucchini.

Jul 16, 2012
JohnMich in Site Talk

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

GH1618: Every country in the world uses weights and metrics. Only the US and those other world leaders, Liberia and Burma don't. The fact that you and your predecessors know instinctively the quantity of ingredients is great but you are being condescending to people without your skill. Scales are essential to we mere mortals

Jul 16, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

What nonsense! The only intelligent way to say what a recipe requires is by weight. If you are buying weigh them. If you have them in hand weigh them. If somone tells you 3 large carrots what does thal mean? Nothing unless you know what a large carrot weighs.

Jul 16, 2012
JohnMich in Home Cooking

Metric measures

Paul there are no issues to address re: zucchinin. In Oz that is exactly what they are called as I learnt from SWMBO when I brought back a cucumber instead of the zucchini I was told to get.

The only real problem relates to the zucchini measurements. The first measure stated is 14 ozs. which in the US is 396.83 gms but at the end is said to be about 3 cups which in US volume is about 710ml. Now that just can't work out because zucchinis are about 95% water so what is being said is that the 14ozs = 397 gms = 397 mls of H2O yet 3 cups is about 710 mls of H2O that makes the 3 cup measure about twice as heavy. I would rely on the 14 oz measure if I was making it

Now the rest is a piece of cake LOL. 1 US tsp is 4.9 mgs = metric 5 gms; US 1/2 tsp is 2.5 gms = M 2.5 gms; 1 US tbsp = 14.9 gms = M 15gms; a US cup = 236.6 gms = 240 gms M, and so on. In other words any variations are 11/13th of FA, where FA is a very small number.

If you are interested I will send you a table of exact and rounded concersions which I concocted many years ago when I first realised that the US had some great cookery sites but did not know much about metrics. Incidentally the US customary use of cups as weight AND volume measures leads to much greater variations in measures than metric conversions. There is a vast difference between the weight of a cup of brown sugar just poured into a cup until it is full than one where the sugar has been tapped (packed) down as it has been filled, for example. 10% as a guess? Only the US uses cups for ingredients which are more accurate if weighed.

My source for all measurement comes from a brilliant site at the University of North Carolina thus >
http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/ind...

Jul 16, 2012
JohnMich in Site Talk

Metric measures

I agree PJ. The version used by the massive www.food.com site comes up with some very weird results because of exact conversions like 1/2 cup = 118.29 ml. Intelligently rounded conversions are the go. I do not agree with you about the need for testing because as many cooks say the slight variations are no more out of whack than commonly occurs in general cooking. The main stress is that one does not go about using a mix of units ie. metric and US in the same recipe.
If a metric cup is rounded to 240 ml then it is not a big stretch from the 236.6 ml of a US cup, in fact about 1.4% or about 1/2 a teaspoon! Cups are very popular measures in US cooking where as you know they are used for liquid and dry meassures, so converion to rounded metric is not much of a change.

Ingredient names are never an issue. If you do not know what an ingredient is then google it preceded by the word define as in 'define chipotle' say, which I did recently. I got back "
A smoked hot chili pepper used esp. in Mexican cooking" - that took about 1 second.
Thanks for the reference to the peeves thread, I'll have a look.

Jul 16, 2012
JohnMich in Site Talk

Metric measures

JF you seem to use Wikipedia and so do I. My statement that the US was one of the first countries to adopt metrics as a system was entirely accurate ex Wikipedia -

"In 1875, the United States solidified its commitment to the development of the internationally recognized metric system by becoming one of the original seventeen signatory nations to the Metre Convention or the Treaty of the Meter. The signing of this international agreement concluded five years of meetings in which the metric system was reformulated, refining the accuracy of its standards. The Treaty of the Meter established the Bureau international des poids et mesures (BIPM, International Bureau of Weights and Measures) in Sèvres, France, to provide standards of measurement for worldwide use."
Unfortunately the US did not follow through hence now its grouping with those international leaders Liberia and Burma.

Jul 12, 2012
JohnMich in Site Talk

Blue Cheese and Chive Compound Butter

Good recipe and very easy to make. But why use UNSALTED butter then add a teaspoon of salt? Food fads gone mad!

Jul 12, 2012
JohnMich in Recipes

Metric measures

I would like to see metric measures as well as US measures on recipes. The US was one of the first countries to adopt the metric concept. Most of the world uses metric measures. It would be a great service to your international subscribers and very educational for yourUS ones as well.

JohnMich from Australia

Jul 05, 2012
JohnMich in Site Talk

CHOW Pancetta

SamFen. See Ladron's review 24 July 07. There he gives URL for his blog which includes a recipe for pancetta tesa - the flat variety you are looking for - plus much, much more.

This is it- http://menuinprogress.blogspot.com/20...

May 24, 2012
JohnMich in Recipes

Chocolate Malted Milk Shake

I don't care whose watching. Out of the blender jug is the way to go!

Mar 07, 2011
JohnMich in Recipes

Dutch Baby Pancake

We made this yesterday and could not believe how much it rose and how delicious it was. We didn't have an orange on hand so used lemon and added a bit of sugar to offset tartness. Michelle says the best pancake ever. Plus we did the caramelised pears and wow! are they good? You betcha!
The advice about the oven temperature is spot on - our oven has a mind of its own but a $4 thermometer solves that.
We used a 12"/300mm LeCreuset enamelled cast iron fry-pan with no problems.
So surprised at result we took photos!
This is a brilliant website
Regards from Australia, John

Jun 05, 2010
JohnMich in Recipes

Blueberry Dragon Fruit Chocolate Ganache Cupcakes

Of course it was your personal opinion. However I asked you a reasonable question in a civil way.

Your gratuitous introduction of the subject of death was in my personal opinion rude and somewhat offensive. I find your attempted spin on your open mindedness faintly ridiculous.

If you want to push your line of thinking there are more appropriate forums than the comments section of a recipe website.

Jan 16, 2010
JohnMich in Recipes