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Holiday Reads to Give & Get for Chowhounds

Yes -- enjoyed it but not as much as Tender.

Holiday Reads to Give & Get for Chowhounds

Tender at the Bone by Ruth Reichel

Dec 16, 2014
elegraph in Food Media & News

Enough televised cooking competitions!

or gardening on the Home and Garden channel.

Dec 16, 2014
elegraph in Food Media & News

Are Brown Rice's (and other wild rice's) Suppose To Be Creamy/Sticky?

This information on Lundberg's wild rice blend is from their website:

Ingredients
Long Grain Brown Rice, Sweet Brown Rice, Wild Rice, Whole Grain Wehani® Rice, Whole Grain Black Japonica™ Rice.

The mix contains both wild rice and japonica rice. The wild rice is probably cultivated.

Dec 15, 2014
elegraph in General Topics

Are Brown Rice's (and other wild rice's) Suppose To Be Creamy/Sticky?

You are correct that wild rice is a grain, not a rice; however, most commercially sold wild rice is cultivated, not truly wild. Wild rice harvesting belongs exclusively to the Ojibwe tribes (Minnesota, Wisconsin, parts of Canada) and permits are required. True wild rice is sold by Ojibwe-run operations, requires a long cooking time, and is expensive so is not as commercially viable as the cultivated version. The taste is far superior and if you get ahold of some, don't mess it up with other grains and rices.

Dec 15, 2014
elegraph in General Topics
1

2014 in the kitchen: What were the best new things you made?

Spicy Remoulade Sauce:
½ c. mayonnaise
1 Tbsp. dill relish
1 Tbsp. horseradish
1 tsp. Sriracha
½ tsp. Cajun Seasoning (I use Penzey's)
1/8 tsp. Cayenne (opt., for added heat)
Juice from half a lime
Salt and pepper, to taste

Dec 15, 2014
elegraph in Home Cooking
1

2014 in the kitchen: What were the best new things you made?

This looks like a great solution -- so much simpler -- and I will try it this week. Thanks for posting!

Dec 14, 2014
elegraph in Home Cooking

2014 in the kitchen: What were the best new things you made?

I've been cooking for many, many years (self taught) so it's fun for me to try new things. The other night I roasted a duck for the first time and it turned out great. Husband requested that I make the orange glaze again the next time I roast a chicken.

I also learned to grill chicken pieces and thick, lean pork chops to perfection. Compliments from said husband, who doesn't seem to mind being replaced at the grill now and then.

I made the classic scallops dish, Coquilles St-Jacques (Gratinéed Scallops)from Saveur Magazine, even serving them on real scallop shells handed down from MIL. It was fun but I personally found them far too rich for today's healthier taste.

I cooked with ground lamb for the first time. I can't remember what I made but I wasn't impressed. In 2015 (summer) I will try cooking lamb chops or shoulder. The lambs are raised on a farm nearby and the meat is quite expensive but the freshness is worth it.

I smoked a trout (steelhead?) in my Coleman stove-top smoker and made the leftovers into smoked trout chowder and a smoked trout and cream cheese spread; both were delicious. Also a bit rich so not for every day.

I made shrimp po-boys for the first time and found a killer remoulade to go with them. They are now part of our regular repertoire. I wasn't as lucky with fish tacos, which were also a new endeavor. Breading and frying fish is a lot of work and a big mess, and the result wasn't that impressive.

For our weekly meatless days I fixed a spinach-artichoke lasagne which I loved but spouse wasn't sure about. He had to ask what the artichokes were and I think he was uncertain if he should like them or not. But I will repeat that recipe or use the same sauce over linguine some time and he may like it better as it becomes more familiar.

I'm glad you asked the question in this post because I feel like I cook the same things over and over, but I see I've expanded my horizons, along with my waistline, by trying lots of new things this year.

Are Brown Rice's (and other wild rice's) Suppose To Be Creamy/Sticky?

Neither should be creamy or sticky. Try cooking them a few minutes longer.

Dec 14, 2014
elegraph in General Topics

Do you ever dream of food?

That IS an intersting question. As a restaurant owner and fanatic home cook, one would think the answer would be yes; however, I do not dream of food itself, except when I'm in a rare creative mode, trying to dream up new ideas, literally.

On the other hand, I frequently have nightmares about being slammed while cooking on the line. Can't cook enough food fast enough, servers and customers getting angry, etc. Seldom happens in real life but when it does, it's a real nightmare.

Dec 11, 2014
elegraph in Not About Food

Baked stuffed potatoes ahead of time

The problems with doing them beforehand include 1) the longer they sit, the older they will taste and 2) the risk of food poisoning, including botulism, if you don't cool them properly after baking. As a restaurant owner, I would NOT do them ahead of time unless you don't mind serving "leftovers" to your guests.

Dec 11, 2014
elegraph in Home Cooking

Venison Question

Venison stew should be very good. Be sure to trim off all visible fat as well as any freezer burn; otherwise you will detect some "off" flavors. The addition of canned tomatoes (stewed, diced, pureed, whatever) helps to offset the wild taste. Cook it low and slow.

Dec 11, 2014
elegraph in Home Cooking

How to keep Butter from absorbing refrigerator odors

Store butter in its original wrapping, which was specially designed to avoid absorbing unpleasant odorts. Seriously, this was considered a major advancement in the dairy industry.

http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main...

Dec 10, 2014
elegraph in General Topics

Help we have fruit flies...need extreme measures.

I clean all the drains in my house with a combination of baking soda followed by vinegar followed by boiling water. That and keeping all sweet food put away clears it right up.

Dec 07, 2014
elegraph in Not About Food

Recipes for commercially canned peaches

Dec 07, 2014
elegraph in Home Cooking

ISO advice from seasoned cookie bakers and/or crafty types

Having taught this age group for several years, albeit a long time ago, I would make this a cookie decorating party rather than baking several recipes from scratch. Some girls would enjoy the whole process but others would be easily frustrated and lose interest before the fun of decorating could begin. Same with cutouts -- not fun for everyone. Frankly, I would buy ready-to-bake sugar cookies and lots of different colored sugars, nonpareils, toppings, frostings, etc. and let them personalize a fixed number of cookies. While they bake have everyone help clean up the kitchen.

Question for short order cooks

It sounds like your eggs are "basted." If you order over easy, they should be flipped without breaking the yolks. The egg man in our restaurant flips them a second time when he plates them, since the second side never looks as good. It may well be the cooks you've encountered don't know how to cook over-easy eggs, or they care more about how they look than what you ordered. Or they figure there isn't much difference in taste so it isn't worth risking breaking the yolks by flipping them.

Nov 26, 2014
elegraph in General Topics

Friendship Cake with Fruit Cocktail

My mom used to make "Fruit Cocktail Dessert." The recipe:
1 c. flour
1 c. sugar
1 tsp. baking soda
1 beaten egg
1 (#2) can fruit cocktail, drained
1/4 c. brown sugar
1/2 c. chopped nuts

Sift together flour, sugar, and baking soda. Add beaten egg and fruit cocktail.

Put into greased 8" square baking dish. Mix together brown sugar and nuts. Sprinkle over top.

Bake in 300 F. oven for 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Serve with whipped cream.

Nov 12, 2014
elegraph in Home Cooking

Food or food related magazines?

I love Saveur magazine and give subscription gifts every year. I read it cover to cover when it arrives although I seldom cook from it. I have e-subscriptions to Eating Well and AllRecipes but the content isn't as interesting as Saveur. I'm always on the lookout for food trends, new ideas for old stand-byes, and inspiration for this week's suppers. I used to subscribe to Cooks Illustrated but dropped them because of their obnoxious, never-ending marketing.

Nov 07, 2014
elegraph in Food Media & News
1

undercooked chicken schnitzel, HELP!!

Try microwaving them then re-fry them if they get soggy.

Nov 06, 2014
elegraph in Home Cooking

Enough televised cooking competitions!

Other than occasional episodes of Chopped, I have no interest in and do not watch shows based on competitive cooking. I must not be part of the food networks' target market because there are more and more competitions taking place. I just want to watch the usual demonstrations that do not depend on winners and losers to supply the interest. I want ideas for how to use this herb, how to cook that grain, what to do with tonight's chicken. Does any one else turn the channel when these competitions come on?

Nov 06, 2014
elegraph in Food Media & News

How much should $1000 worth of groceries last a family of 4, 2 adults and 2 teens that eat like adults? Please help!

When my 3 boys were teens, I thought it would have been more efficient to feed them as the food came off the conveyor belt, instead of having to bag it up, haul it home, put it away, and have it gone by morning.

I think every family is different and our priorities vary as to convenience vs. cost. Also, if your teens are in a growth spurt, you will need to spend more until they level off.

Why boil brats?

Why beer? Milwaukee was once the home of numerous German breweries. The workers were allowed an allotment of beer to take home with them each day. The housewives quickly learned what to do with any excess beer: use it to simmer brats, spareribs, etc., often with a few sliced onions.

Simmering the brats beforehand ensures they will be cooked through after browning them on the grill. If you are cooking for a crowd, open-house style, you can grill up a bunch of brats then finish them in the simmering beer, keeping them warm and servable for several hours.

Here in Wisconsin I've seen them done both ways, and both are delicious.

Oct 28, 2014
elegraph in Home Cooking

favorite fish dish

Walnut-crusted, pan-fried walleye (available in some restaurants in the upper Midwest as well as my own kitchen).

Oct 21, 2014
elegraph in General Topics

"We don't take reservations for less than 6." Restaurant Owners Listen Up! [moved from Seattle board]

That;s good to know. Thanks!

Oct 21, 2014
elegraph in Not About Food

"We don't take reservations for less than 6." Restaurant Owners Listen Up! [moved from Seattle board]

" I can make a pretty darn good huevos rancheros (my favorite breakfast) at home..."

This statement calls into question our ability to satisfy you as a customer. Rather than serve you a meal that doesn't live up to your own cooking and have you bad-mouthing us all over town and the internet, I'd rather not serve you. Don't take it personally.

Chances are someone else is waiting for your table who will be delighted with their experience and will spread the good word. The best marketing for any business is positive word of mouth, and we try to achieve that with outstanding food and service.

This has been a thought-provoking discussion and I appreciate all the comments.

BTW...what restaurants in San Francisco accept reservations for breakfast? Next time I'm out there I might check them out and see how they do it.

Oct 19, 2014
elegraph in Not About Food

"We don't take reservations for less than 6." Restaurant Owners Listen Up! [moved from Seattle board]

I was thinking about supper clubs that sell steaks and prime rib; they rely on reservations so they know how much of each to prepare. We don't have to worry about preparing such expensive menu items. If we don't sell the bacon/eggs/hash browns etc. today, we will do so tomorrow, and they will still be cooked fresh to order.

We do not make a "chunk" on our Bloody Marys or any other beverage. Our coffee price has been the same for 12 years.

Also, when you show up at our door without a reservation, you seldom have to wait for a table. When there is a wait, it is generally 20 minutes or less.

And frankly, if you can cook a better breakfast at home, we prefer that you do so.

Oct 18, 2014
elegraph in Not About Food

"We don't take reservations for less than 6." Restaurant Owners Listen Up! [moved from Seattle board]

Thank you all for a good discussion.

First, I'm not exaggerating about seating a party of 26 without reservations. They were spread out among 3 tables. Two servers took their orders and turned in each ticket as it was filled. We have 4 cooks, one each assigned to eggs, potatoes, meats/pancakes, and toast. You'd be surprised how fast we can turn out meals for a large group, even with a complicated 6-page menu. And if you are #27, it doesn't make any difference to you if those 26 ahead of you are from one party or several, your wait will be the same.

Second, our no-reservations policy isn't about profit, it's ALL about customer service. Have you ever waited at a cash register in a retail store while the clerk deals with a customer on the phone? Don't you want to say, "Hey! I was here first! You should be waiting on ME!"?

And yes, we do have a bar and will happily sell you a Bloody Mary or whatever while you wait, or we will put out a pot of coffee for you, and sometimes we will comp the drinks to make up for a longer than usual wait.

Finally: We don't need to take reservations to fill our tables because we cook your meals to order, so we don't require an advance count of which foods to prepare. In general, I think reservations benefit the restaurant, not the customer.

Oct 17, 2014
elegraph in Not About Food
1

"We don't take reservations for less than 6." Restaurant Owners Listen Up! [moved from Seattle board]

Our family owns a popular breakfast place in a seasonal tourist destination. Although we don't accept reservations, we encourage parties of 8 or more to call ahead. We have hosted parties as large as 26 without prior reservations.

Our reason for the no reservations policy is out of concern for our guests who are waiting patiently at the door. (We do not steer them to the bar, although we will sell them drinks if they ask.) We run a wait list every weekend throughout the summer; very few customers are unwilling/unable to wait the 15 to 30 minutes for a table. I'm told that as our customers are leaving, they are telling the ones who are waiting that it is "worth the wait."

In a perfect world we would have exactly as many seats available as we have customers. As it is, I can't see making some customers wait at the door while they can clearly see empty tables which may or may not be filled by those with reservations.

Also, there aren't any golden arches out by our sign. You may have to wait, but we will feed you a delicious, home-cooked, memorable meal.

Thanksgiving and Christmas in the US

I couldn't agree more with do what you want and make your own traditions. My (grown-up) vegetarian son celebrates with meatless tacos or enchiladas. We (Irish-American) non-vegetarians have been known to observe Thanksgiving with New England boiled dinner (aka corned beef and cabbage). We also have had the traditional turkey dinner at Thanksgiving and a baked ham dinner at Christmas.

Some families celebrate Christmas with roast goose or duck. Agree with holding off on Christmas decorations until mid-December but admit that last year our beautiful green pine Christmas wreath adorned our front porch until well into May. (It was a long winter.)

Oct 03, 2014
elegraph in General Topics
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