a

ah6tyfour's Profile

Title Last Reply

What is the appeal of Yusho?

Yea, a $50 bowl of ramen is a bit far-fetched. Especially if it's not that special. It would be like Ichiza selling $9 yakitori skewers or Secret Pizza at Cosmo selling white pizza by the slice for $16.

It's a very strange feeling when that cost/value ratio is off. It's something I have never experienced to the degree I did at Yusho. It's as if Yusho just went over that edge. A small dish of house pickles for $3? Great. $5? Getting a bit high up there, but maybe they're really good! $9? Yikes, there's no way we just paid $9 for this little saucer of veggies.

You can find reservations at Alinea for $210 sometimes. Why would anyone buy a $50 bowl of ramen when you can have a cutting-edge memorable tasting menu for $210?

1 day ago
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

Strange that you'd get the giant bowl for omekase and not the normal bowl. What did you think of it? Was it a satisfying good bowl of ramen?

I can't even comprehend a bowl of ramen that's $40-$55. That would be like going to a new taco shop and paying $10 for an al pastor street taco!

1 day ago
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

What's the monster ramen? Is it the size of a normal bowl of ramen elsewhere? How was it?

Looks like it's on the Monte Carlo website as $55. Did you end up paying $55 or $40? If $55, then that means the YushoLV website really is new pricing.

Still though, $40 for their ramen? That's four bowls of ramen and an order of edamame elsewhere. And those places would use good ramen noodles and have a decent broth!

Jul 26, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

Hmm, very interesting!
You're right: http://www.yusholv.com/food-drink/

I would be inclined to say your site is more accurate since it would be easier to update an internal website than to get Monte Carlo to update their website. But it's also possible this was the pricing pre-opening and they raised everything when finalizing the menu for opening.

Ugh, even their homepage sucks. It looks like a "Learn HTML" intro class website from the 1990s!

EDIT:
You might be right! This yelp review has prices that match your menu (especially the flat $20 price for 3 buns...except she wrote it as $10). She also says she got six chicken drummies when her picture shows the normal service size of 4, so not sure how reliable she is. http://www.yelp.com/biz/yusho-las-veg...

Jul 26, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

I just checked the online menu against the prices in my initial post. They're all the same except the pork shoulder bun, which either went down by $1 or I wrote the wrong price on my review. I'm going with no pricing changes and I just made a mistake on that one item.

Did you see some other items that changed price? For me, things like the house-made pickles would need to be dropped down to $4 or $5. The bowl of ramen needs to come down to $12-14. Essentially, drop everything by around 40%.

By how empty it seems to be every time I walk by, they're better off dropping everything down 30-40% than ending up on Groupon in a few months.

Jul 25, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Wedding Rehersal Dinner in Vegas - Any GOOD BBQ Buffets/Restos?

That's a great idea! It won't be as hot and fresh from the kitchen and your choices would be a bit more limited than being able to just let everyone at the table order to their hearts' content, but it would probably be the better idea. You would have to predict which things people want and stick to just 3-4 meats and a few sides instead of just randomly ordering smoked meatloaf and burgers and another round of hush puppies. I hear very positive things about their catering/delivery service.

Here's a picture of the quality of the pork ribs from another forum:
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hLeqsD4X8c8...

Maybe you could go all out and get TWO of the "Big Man" party pack. You'd end up with 4 slabs of ribs, 4 chickens, 4 pounds of meat of your choice (maybe split it into 2 pounds of brisket and 2 pounds of links), 8 pints of sides, 4 pints of sauce (maybe get 3 normal and 1 spicy), and 40 buns. And then maybe add on 2 slabs of beef ribs. Wow, that's a TON of food. Can I come?

There's also a 10% off coupon on their website. I don't know if it'll apply to party packs, but it'd save you a good $30.

Jul 24, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

Yes, please do. I really feel like I got them on a really off day and I feel terrible for disliking them so much. I need to see about going back and trying again, but I don't think anyone would be willing to go with me after our previous visit.

Jul 24, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

That distinction should definitely have gone to Monta. Or the ramen option at Omae. Such a shame.

Jul 24, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

My bowl of Logan Poser Ramen was sour. It tasted a bit like that Russian Borscht soup they serve at Hong Kong cafe places. The Poser Ramen had mustard seeds in it, with the acidity and taste of some cooked cabbage. It was really weird. And really salty. It was a bowl of disappointment =(

It was not "rameny" to me at all. When I think of ramen, I think of a rich, complex broth with a fattiness that gives the broth body to cling to noodles. I love ramen because it's a bowl that looks so simple, yet the technique and the depth is so complex.

My friends and I compared the flavor of the ramen broth to this package of hot and sour instant udon. It's pretty close:
http://theworldsbestever.s3.amazonaws...

Jul 24, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Vegas eats with kids - Bellagio buffet? Fois Gras?

This is also why I go to Aria buffet often. The desserts (or at least some of them) are definitely from JP. I stayed at Aria once on a special occasion and a plate of desserts from JP were in my room waiting for me. The exact rectangular macaroon (which is one of my favorite desserts at the buffet) was included, as was a few assorted pieces I've also seen at the buffet. There were some chocolates and a card signed by JP. The quality of the Aria buffet desserts are noticeably better and more polished than other buffets. I do miss the old glass plates they used to have for the plated desserts.

Jul 23, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Wedding Rehersal Dinner in Vegas - Any GOOD BBQ Buffets/Restos?

You just blew my mind. I don't know why I never thought to ask. I guess I just assumed everything is pre-prepared with barbecue and so the brisket was completely chopped in the morning.

This changes everything. My next three-meat combo will be pork ribs, unchopped brisket, and pulled pork or a link. Thanks!

Jul 23, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Wedding Rehersal Dinner in Vegas - Any GOOD BBQ Buffets/Restos?

I think it will be a good choice then. It's near the Fashion Show Mall, although you do need to cross train tracks. There are also a couple strip clubs somewhat nearby, but you won't really see them unless you drive the wrong way.

They have a large alcove off the main dining area which I've seen set up as one big long table for 20-30 people. In any case, I'm sure they'd accommodate. I usually find I can't eat enough BBQ to make the $25 worth it, but if you're going as a big party, might as well just pay the buffet price so you know the exact bill and so everyone will be free to order as much as they want. Drinks are included and offered as a self-serve fountain drinks as well as sweet tea.

The only thing I dislike about Rollin' Smoke is their brisket. It comes chopped. So if you decide to pack your plate full of pulled pork and brisket, you end up with two mushy meats.

Jul 23, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Wedding Rehersal Dinner in Vegas - Any GOOD BBQ Buffets/Restos?

The best BBQ in town is Rollin' Smoke. It's not a fancy or classy place, so not sure it'd be a very good place or a rehearsal dinner. They have an alll-you-can-eat option for $25, where you can order whatever you want off the menu. I'm sure they could work out something for you.

Their pork ribs are great, although I prefer their amazing beef ribs. The sides are mostly good (avoid the mac and cheese). They make a normal sauce as well as a spicy sauce in-house. They have smoked meatloaf, this ridiculous Outlaw Burger, and even some fried shrimp and catfish. The owners and operators have authentic southern charm.

It's not the best atmosphere for this sort of thing, but the food will be better than any other BBQ place.

Jul 23, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Vegas eats with kids - Bellagio buffet? Fois Gras?

They only had snow crab legs when I went in early July. Hopefully it was just a fluke and they were just out of stock on king crab. I've always counted on Aria to have great king crab. Until my most recent visit, they were the only buffet to consistently serve king crab with dinner.

Jul 23, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Vegas eats with kids - Bellagio buffet? Fois Gras?

Do you know if they're still serving that dish? I had a friend recently report that they had the same foie dish, but served with a waffle instead of french toast. He said it was not quite as good as with french toast. On the STK website, it lists the foie waffle as a signature dish. Did they change this?

Jul 23, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

It's all very curious to me. I think it's at the point where I will have to return to Yusho just to see if it was a fluke.

Those "Best of" lists are usually pretty bad, no matter the city. The ones in this city are especially bad. The LV Weekly one seems like they had a list of restaurants in mind and just made up categories for them to win. And most of them seem to be new places that got Eater hype prior to opening. I do agree with one thing about Yusho. It would probably do well at Cosmo (in the China Poblano space).

Jul 18, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Japanese Cuisine by Omae - my review

I'm glad you could tell they were fish. As you can see from my accurate depiction, Las Vegas water is not really fit for raising living creatures in!

At Omae, each table for four is made up of two two-tops pushed together (so they ordered a total of eight two-tops to form four tables for four and then sacrifice four possible seating spots to keep a clear walkway). But a real four-top is usually shorter in length than two two-tops pushed together (of course there are many table sizes to choose from, but this is usually true). It's only slightly noticeable, but in a small space like this, I think buying four-tops would actually allow them to squeeze in an extra table on each side. It's also more aesthetically pleasing to have one table meant for four vs having a line running down the middle (especially if the tables start to become unlevel in different ways)

Perhaps they did it the way they did in anticipation of being able to just move tables together and apart again to accomodate extra parties of 2 or 4? But their reservation system only allows two groups of 2 and two groups of 4 for any seating time, so moving tables around will never actually happen.

Jul 18, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Japanese Cuisine by Omae - my review

Here's the layout of the dining room. Please excuse my terrible MS Paint skills.
http://imgur.com/cbud5mN

As you can see, there are four tables (each of those created by two two-tops). Because of the tight space, two of the four tables are actually meant for two people, who both need to sit on the same side to keep a clear walkway. I now know why the waiter seated us on the same side.

The koi pond and the random closed off room really waste space. And if they would use four-tops instead of two two-tops, they could definitely add at least one more table on each side. The wall opposite the empty room was also unused space. If they tear down the koi pond and that side room, they could add more tables or install some counter seating.

Jul 18, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Japanese Cuisine by Omae - my review

No problem! It's also the one I've been the most excited about for the past month or so. I reserved my table over a week ago and the wait was tough.

There is currently no dinner service. Lunch is served only as a 3-course meal for $20, inclusive of a drink. Extra entrees are $12. Dinner service will only start when the kaiseki starts.

Jul 18, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Japanese Cuisine by Omae - my review

Whoops! You're right. Tonkotsu. Not the breaded and fried pork! Thanks! I shall edit now. In any case, it was not available. =)

Jul 18, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Japanese Cuisine by Omae - my review

Chef Omae of Morimoto XEX Tokyo fame opened up a place in Vegas near Chinatown. It had great reviews initially with lots of buzz generated by critics, but he had to shut the place down for a couple weeks while he went back to Japan on business. Service restarted on the 15th and I was able to drop by for lunch today.

In short, the food is solid and comes at a great price. $20 for three courses, the last of which is the main course and offers you a choice of entrees. The meal comes with a non-alcoholic drink of your choice. The tonkotsu ramen was removed from the menu at the reopening, but it was replaced by a chicken ramen. If ramen is not your thing, you can also choose a Japanese ketchup omelette or curry.

The restaurant is a small space consisting of four tables total. To me, it was not a good use of space. There was a strange koi pond and a blocked off area that, in total, used up more than 25% of the room. The room itself was simple, but had a certain charm. It definitely looks like they took over a prior business' space and just worked within the confines of the space rather than ripping it out and redesigning the restaurant from scratch.

As for the food, it was overall quite excellent. First course was a three-layer cold soup that was perfect for the hot weather. It was rich and flavorful, with the dashi base making it quite savory. Small spheres of puffed rice gave it great texture. The only strange thing is that it's three layers, but the waiter instructs you to mix all three layers together before eating. So why not just mix it prior and call it soup? That aside, it was a very complex dish in flavor and texture and a very strong start for Chef Omae.

Second course was, unfortunately, much less successful for me. Described as "Petite Assorted Appetizer", it is visually appealing and the dish you see pictured on all the reviews, but it lacked focus. A shrimp, a tempura yam, edamame on a toothpick, and fried lotus chips all looked great, but there was nothing bringing the dish together. I couldn't tell if I was supposed to eat everything together in one bite or if each item stood alone. The shrimp was well cooked, the tempura was okay, but it just did not feel like a dish. This dish needed a light dashi broth or something to bring it all together. In fact, if they plated the tempura and shrimp in the middle of a bowl and poured in some of that three-layer soup around it, it would be a great dish.

The main course is where Omae shined brightest. The Wok-Charred Chicken Ramen was unlike any ramen I have ever had before. It was intensely rich and the chicken flavor came through beautifully. The slices of chicken were surprisingly tender and had great flavor (like char siu, but with chicken). The broth was deep, complex, and got better with each sip. Often, rich ramen soups can be just salty and muddled in flavor, but this broth was different. The most amazing part of the dish, however, was the soft-boiled egg. The entire egg is included with your ramen and they managed to perfectly set the white while the yolk stayed completely liquid (not a gel, just a pourable liquid). They're either cooking the eggs sous vide or they're just really good at cooking eggs. Chef Omae uses thick ramen noodles cooked perfectly al dente. They pick up the sauce nicely. As a whole, it's a great bowl of ramen. It's completely different from the type of ramen Monta serves.

We also tried the Chicken Rice Omelette, which was good, but not as good as the ramen. The dish is a traditional Japanese dish with ketchup rice wrapped in an egg omelette, with more ketchup on top. Omae's version is quite good. The tanginess of the rice went well with the well-cooked egg crepe covering it. Overall, it was good, but not amazing. Perhaps I'm just used to the Taiwanese version of the dish, but I like my ketchup rice to be firmer (Omae's was more mushy) and more fried. I have never had fried rice at a Japanese restaurant before, so maybe soft rice is normal. I'm used to cooking fried rice with day old rice in a hot wok. I also like my egg crepe much thinner and my ketchup a bit more varied than just normal ketchup (adding a little wasabi or horseradish to it would help). The only part of the dish I did not like was the chicken. The chicken chunks seemed pretty unflavored and did not contribute to the dish at all.

Overall, it's a good meal for $20. I would definitely stick with the ramen. This place is new and it shows. The menu looks fancy at first, but the text describing each dish is written in TINY cursive letters on a glossy pearl-textured paper that just messes with your eyes. It's barely readable. There's also a strange feeling of not getting dessert after such a rich main course. A small scoop of yuzu sorbet, a mochi ice cream, a cold cream puff, or even just a good-quality slice of orange would be a great addition to the menu. Service is another soft spot. While the waiter was very pleasant, he seemed a bit inexperienced. He gave us menus and watched us look it over for 5-10 minutes and waited until after we ordered ramen to inform us that the listed tonkotsu ramen had been switched to chicken ramen. He also seated us at a table that still had the prior table's check sitting there and somehow each place setting got two copies of the menu. I went with a buddy of mine (we're both guys) and the waiter chose to seat us at a four-top with both of us seated on the same side. Seemed a weird choice. Lastly, they could definitely use some reconfiguring of the restaurant space. Some wood paneling and an open kitchen would do wonders for the place.

Chef Omae is starting kaiseki dinner soon and I can't wait to see what he'll come up with. His place definitely needs some work and some refinement, but the potential is there.

Jul 18, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Vegas Strip Dinner for Guys

I would say go to Jaleo at Cosmo.

Jul 18, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

Las Vegas Magazine gave Yusho a great review today: http://lasvegasmagazine.com/dining/20...

The most interesting part about it is the image of the ramen. Based on the chopsticks and the fried chicken as size standards, the bowl served was larger than the miso soup bowl I was given. It might be an optical illusion due to the top of the bowl being wider, or maybe they realized they needed to make the dish more substantial for the price. Or they knew he was a reviewer, so they gave him a little extra.

I also really want to know what kind of noodles Yusho uses for Ramen. To me, they're either instant noodles or they're the packaged "fresh" noodles you buy at the Asian grocery stores (the ones that come individually sealed in airtight plastic). No other noodles have that random curliness. It's definitely not the kind of noodle I like in my ramen. This person also somehow managed to get almost double the amount of soup and noodle. My bowl was only half-full.
http://s3-media4.fl.yelpcdn.com/bphot...

Jul 18, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

What does winning a Michelin Star have to do with producing great food? For her to be awarded one, she'd have to open up in New York, Chicago, or San Francisco. How many thousands of amazing chefs work outside those cities and do not qualify for stars? Providence and Urasawa in Los Angeles don't have stars. Roe and Castagna in Portland don't have stars. And Joel Robuchon and Guy Savoy in Vegas don't have stars either, since Michelin Guide no longer offers a Vegas guide. As for experience, how many popular and successful chefs pride themselves on being "self-taught"? How many have signature dishes "inspired by what my mom would cook for me on Sundays"? The proof of a chef's quality is the food, not some award that's only given out in three major cities in the US.

Anyway, we're way off topic now. This is a Yusho thread. You can bump my Giada review back up if you want to continue.

Jul 15, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

My Baccanal Buffet (Caesar's Palace) review - LONG

Thanks for the updated review! I haven't been to Bacchanal in quite a long time, so it's nice to see that the quality is holding up nicely.

The last time I was there, they had a miso cod with wasabi mashed potatoes and dehydrated ginger. It was excellent and something I wouldn't have expected from a buffet.

SLS's buffet opens up in a month. I wonder how it'll compare.

Jul 15, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

Wow, it would be amazing if the ingredient cost was that much. But if so, it shows. It is an amazing dish. Unfortunately, at least at Per Se, it sets a standard so high no other dish they put in front of you can match it. I don't see it on the current salon menu, but I remember it was available a la carte from the Salon for ~$65.

Giada's pricing did not seem at all disproportionate to the offering for me. The $28 serving of spaghetti is slightly more pasta than Scarpetta's $24 spaghetti. And Giada's version came with three very large prawns. In my mind, around $25ish is expected for good quality pasta made on site with well-developed flavors. And the serving expectation is 1 tong-grab twirled into a mountain and put on a plate. Based on my Yusho experience, if they were to make pasta, I think it would be $32 for a small mound served in a gyoza dipping sauce cup and it would taste like it was missing a key ingredient.

I try not to go to Hash House. The portions are so big they almost make me ill. Because I have no self control and will eat the gigantic fried chicken and both waffles with bacon running through it.

How about you go to Giada's and I'll go to Twist? =P

Jul 15, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Crawfish

And the fried catfish basket! The breading they use is a much finer cornmeal (maybe even half flour half cornmeal), allowing for a very thin layer of breading, which I find superior to the normal breading for fried catfish (like what Catfish Alley does). You get 4-5 very large pieces of tender fish per order. And it comes over a bed of Cajun fries, so you wouldn't have to order the side of fries.

Jul 15, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Crawfish

Just because crawfish is out of season doesn't mean you shouldn't try Boiling Crab or Hot N Juicy if you've never tried the Asian Cajun seafood places. It's an experience and a flavor you can't get elsewhere. I guess the copycat proliferation of these places during that craze was limited to a few cities (those with high density of Asians).

The mainstay of Boiling Crab and Hot N Juicy is really the shrimp. We're Asian. Crawfish has a poor weight:meat ratio. King crab actually has the best weight:meat ratio. The shells are surprisingly light, unless you get a claw.

Jul 15, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

What is the appeal of Yusho?

Welcome to the board!

It's very strange how almost funny the serving sizes are compared to pricing. In all my years of eating, I have never experienced a time where I actually thought pricing was so ridiculously off. Even eating Thomas Keller's famed "Oysters and Pearls", which ends up being 4-5 small bites for $60ish, it didn't feel off. It's a very strange feeling to have while eating, no matter how fine a restaurant it is.

I also don't think I've ever read uhockey say something like that. He seems like a pretty decent person with a good palate. Maybe one day he'll treat me to Twist...

Jul 14, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas

Crawfish

For some reason, Las Vegas seems to love Hot and Juicy even though the original "Asians open a cajun seafood boil place", Boiling Crab from Southern California, has a location in town. I do mention this often because it seems like most people who come here think Hot N Juicy is doing something novel.

Those of us from Southern California tend to all prefer Boiling Crab. I don't know if it's because they were the original and we're used to their specific taste, but I have yet to meet someone not born-and-raised in Vegas who tried Hot N Juicy and preferred it over Boiling Crab. One caveat is that the few Vegas locals I know prefer Hot N Juicy (or they refuse to try Boiling Crab).

To me, Hot N Juicy is not very good. Their sauce a bit off-balanced and, as seen on Man vs Food, the owner puts the spices in AFTER the seafood is cooked. I'm not sure why he doesn't cook the seafood in the sauce. The result is that the seafood itself is bland, but the bite as a whole is flavorful (sort of like if you make pasta and stir sauce on right before serving...you get the taste of plain pasta covered in a flavored sauce).

Item for item, I find Boiling Crab's seafood to be better cooked. Their shrimp (which is the staple of all these sorts of places) is better cooked. Hot N Juicy's tends to be a bit mealy. I've been to Hot N Juicy twice. Both times, many shrimp heads came detached from the bodies and felt mealy, an indication that the shrimp has been sitting around. Other items like the amazing crawfish basket with cajun fries are also better at Boiling Crab.

I understand that Hot N Juicy made a name for itself in Vegas, but Boiling Crab is the originator of the "Asian people open a cajun seafood boil" craze that spread the nation years ago. Just get everything Whole Sha'bang Medium (shrimp and/or crawfish with corn and sausage) and you'll be eating as well as the Southern California residents. We only go to one of Boiling Crab's competitors if the wait at Boiling Crab is too long (often 2-3 hours).

Oh, whatever you do, don't order gumbo at either place. Guaranteed terrible. Stick to the boiled seafood, the fries, sweet potato fries, and the fried catfish basket, which I love more than any other fried catfish in Vegas.

Last tip: either place you go will give you little plastic cups with salt/pepper inside and then dump a bunch of lemons onto your table. The correct Asian way is to squeeze some lemon into the salt/pepper mix and dip your seafood into it with each bite.

Jul 14, 2014
ah6tyfour in Las Vegas