Caroline1's Profile

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Synthetic Food?

http://tinyurl.com/or493e9

Why am I trembling in fear? <sigh> Well, maybe when Monsanto gmo foods have overwhelmed our pesticide free foods, these guys will be able to replicate Monsanto-free almost original foods for us.

POGO: We have seen the enemy and he is us!

about 15 hours ago
Caroline1 in Food Media & News

I only have salted butter. is that a problem?

Yes, it will work. Probably won't notice much flavor difference, even if you go ahead and add the salt the recipe calls for. BUT...!!! It depends on what your goals are. Salt is a preservative and is added to butter to extend its shelf life for god knows how long!

A little history lesson about butter. Before the age of "agribusiness" (read: ANYTHING to max the bottom line!), which means later 1940s up to mid-1950s when agribusiness crept int the farming and dairy industry full force to meet the food supply demand of the "Baby Boomer" birth rate explosion, which also means before the age of super markets, regardless of where you lived in America, your butter at the grocery store ALWAYS come from local dairies. The grocer's shelves had both salted and unsalted butter, but that was because after unsalted butter was on local grocers shelves for a certain period of time, it was collected and taken back to the dairy's processing/packaging plant where it was salted and repacked in salted butter labels and returned it to the grocer's shelves.

Today some butter is automatically salted when churned and distributed, often without "best by" dates, which means you have no guarantee that salted butter isn't 6 months old or 2 years old.

So whether salted butter is a problem in ANY recipe depends entirely on the chosen freshness standards and cholesterol contributing standards of the user. I ONLY use unsalted organic butter. But then I have a ton of allergies and a heart condition (cholesterol) to deal with, so your mileage may vary... '-)

about 23 hours ago
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Fingerprints on stainless steel appliances

Everything needs cleaning! There are excellent stainless steel cleansers/polishers that do a great job and also reduce fingerprints over time.

1 day ago
Caroline1 in Cookware

scrambled eggs for 125, sous vide possibly?

As others have pointed out, sous vide scrambled eggs are HIGHLY improbable! How ya gonna stir them while they're cooking? However! You do get GREAT Japanese onsen tomago (spa eggs) with sous vide. There are "recipes" (instructions) all over the web, but basically you sous bide them at 62.5C (144.5F) for at least an hour or more. At that time you can cool them quickly with an ice water bath and store them until you're ready to use them, at which time you simply rewarm them in water of that temperature the way a poached egg is reheated. Cook and store in the shell. For service, shell is optional. They can be served as soft boiled or as a substitute for poached.

I sous vide them (perfect duplication of the Japanese hot spring spa eggs), then ease them out of their shell and serve them atop a mushroom risotto that is to die for. But you could set one of those puppies on a slice of Canadian bacon atop an English muffin and bury it in Hollandaise sauce and you've got BREAKFAST! ummm... aka "Eggs Benedict."

You could also reduce your stress levels by turning the whole breakfast for 125 into a quiche feast. To me, the advantage would be no scrambling to scramble on the morning of because you can do the quiche the day before. (AND assuming you have some way of refrigerating that much quiche overnight! I suspect there will be at least one or two people in that crowd who share my dislike of scrambled eggs sitting in their pool of sweat. You could claim to be catering to people like that if you need an excuse. '-)

Good luck! And how come other women get all the luck in finding GREAT husbands? You're a winner!!!

Sep 18, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

The Awful Reign of the Red Delicious

See? See? If I had said that everybody would be calling me a dirty old broad behind my back!

Sep 17, 2014
Caroline1 in Food Media & News

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

You can still order shark fins on the internet, or at least you could two or three years ago. Up until about maybe 4 years ago, one of my local VERY authentic Chinese restaurants had shark fin soup on their LUNCH menu! It was something like $90.00 a bowl! I don't know for sure, but suspect they took it off the menu when import bans went into effect.

A fun story about shark meat... Well, not so fun for my neighbor! About thirty or so years ago when I still lived in Del Mar. CA. the neighbor came over one day in a horrible state of anxiety and stress. It also helps to share that she was Jewish. She was upset over last night's dinner. She had gone to the market and bought some "grey fish" she had cooked for dinner. She was upset and nearly ready to vomit. She had just found out that "grey fish" is a California butcher's euphemism for shark. "My god, I ate shark for dinner last night! Did you know 'grey fish' is just another name for SHARK? What if that shark ate a HUMAN? That would make me a cannibal! It's NOT kosher!" I thought about telling her that "long pig" is still kosher in some parts OF Polynesia, but decided it was probably not a good time time for levity. '-)

Sep 17, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

Pork bung and bird's nests! Now, that's authentic!

Oh, and don't forget shark fins...

Sep 16, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

Discussions of what is authentic and what is not in regard to Chinese food is pretty much a standard subject on these boards, and it always makes me stop and wonder why the best approximation of "back home" food a newly arrived Chinese immigrant can come up with using what he can find locally is ALWAYS so heavily branded as "un-authentic" and an "American dish?" That has always puzzled me. And made me wonder whether those Thanksgiving dinners I made when I lived in Turkey and Greece were "American" or not??? People can come up with strange definitions of what is or is not "authentic."

For me "authenticity" can be defined more by the decade we're talking about than just about any other factor, especially when it comes to Chinese food in America. I am not of Asian background, but I had the great good fortune of growing up with AUTHENTIC Chinese food in the AUTHENTIC China Town of San Francisco as part of my standard summer fair, always prepared by AUTHENTIC Chinese cooks in AUTHENTIC Chinese restaurants. That was way back in the 1930s when China Town, San Francisco was still the largest Chinese city outside of China. I think that title now belongs to Seattle or Vancouver, but I'm not sure.

From the 1930s up through at least the 1960s the vegetables in stir fry dishes were pretty different than they are today. Bean sprouts were very common, but I can't remember the last time I had bean sprouts in a Chinese dish, even when I ask for them! Diagonally sliced celery was also very common back then, but again, it comes up missing even when I ask for it specifically.

The first time I recall seeing broccoli in a Chinese dish was probably about 20 years ago. I found it pretty unappealing and still do. It's not exactly a subtle flavor, and it whacks the hell out of any less powerful veggies in a dish. I would much rather have bok choy in a dish than broccoli any day of the week!

Carrots are another strange veggie to find in Chinese food for me. In the 50s and 60s they were found in Japanese dishes, often scored down the sides before slicing so that after slicing they looked like orange flowers. I think they crept into Chinese stir fries as a close companion to broccoli.

There are some Chinese and/or Chinese-American dishes I have just given up on completely because they are so different and unappetizing compared to what I grew up with. Egg foo yong is one of them. I grew up with (and still love) egg foo yong made with sliced onion, bean sprouts, a few shreds or thin slices of water chestnuts, and maybe a sliced mushroom or two. Meat is optional. And it is dropped into deep fat and allowed to congeal into a large mass before being removed to finish in a frying pan before baptism in a genuinely delicious brown sauce. The last time I had it prepared that way was in a Chinese restaurant in El Paso, that brought new chefs in from Hong Kong annually, under contract to work there for a year, then sent out on their own to make way for the new immigrants the restaurant owner sponsored. Hey, it was a great way to gain entry into the U.S. for the cooks, and a fabulous bonus for all of the restaurant's VERY loyal customers! That restaurant went under after an unfortunate kitchen fire. They never recovered. It was fabulous while it lasted! And there was only ever one staff member in the restaurant who spoke English. The owner. You had to order by number from the menu, and if you wanted a variation on something, the wait person would bring the owner to your table. I'm blessed for having eaten there at least weekly for several years before misfortune shut it down forever. Their egg foo yong was the only decent version of that dish I've had in ANY U.S. Chinese restaurant over the last 50 years!

Another authentic Chinese dish I love is sweet and sour pork. No! Wait! There really *IS* such a thing! But it does not have maraschino red sauce, the pork is not fried in batter, and it won't ruin your clothing if you spill a drop of the sauce on yourself. I got the recipe years and years ago from a small spiral bound cookbook published by an order of missionary nuns in China after World War II. They published it to raise funds for their orphanage and it became quite famous and sought after. They had gathered all of the recipes in their book from local cooks and the pork dish was my favorite. It is made by first steaming pork ribs until tender, then cooling them, coating them well with seasoned corn starch, then deep frying them before saucing them well with the sweet and sour sauce. It was made with soy sauce, sugar, vinegar, and water, and it was intentionally made so pungent with the vinegar that you would choke if you inhaled the fumes when you brought it to your mouth. Oh, and peeled, de-seeded cucumber slices and triangles of onion were the standard veggies in the sauce. NO pineapple!!! I actually had this "authentic" version of sweet and sour once in a newly opened Chinese restaurant. It was delicious! And gone from the menu and replaced by maraschino red over blobs of dense batter surrounding lumps of overcooked pork within a week after their grand opening. I asked what had happened to the "real stuff?" "Oh, you can still special order that, but you have to order a day in advance." So much for authentic!

These days, if I want "authentic" Chinese food, I have learned very well I am NOT going to find it in a Chinese restaurant near me, so I'd better stay home and cook! In fact, I'd better add bean sprouts to my shopping list right now! And one of my local Chinese markets has abalone on sale for $15.00 a pound this week! Sounds like time to cook. '-)

Sep 15, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics
1

Using deboned chicken drumsticks as kebabs

But you learned something! They look delicious. Can I have a bite? Pretty please? '-)

Sep 15, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

The Awful Reign of the Red Delicious

I don't think the changes in apples and tomatoes and roses has anything at all to do with what "we" (consumers) want and EVERYTHING to do with what agribusiness wants. Longer shelf life (looks count, flavor/aroma does not), bruise resistant, good color, retains look of freshness even when it is not.

The unfortunate truth is that the agribusiness researchers and genetic modifiers may not know a damned thing about the plants they're modifying, or what properties those plants have in their unmodified state. Example: Agribusiness spent BIG bucks developing a tomato that reddened fast but ripened slow that would maximize their shipping window. Had the idiots known that all they had to do was ship the tomatoes stem down they would have a week or more to ship them with no deterioration loss, and no huge research hybridization costs. My personal conclusion several decades back was that agribusiness -- especially the research side -- doesn't seem to attract many smart people.

And for the record, I keep my "on the vine" tomatoes in their "clamshell" on the counter top stem down. They last literally for weeks! I buy tomatoes once a month, and always have fresh tomatoes on hand.

Sep 14, 2014
Caroline1 in Food Media & News
1

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

Oh, my. Tiki bars... I'd much rather have a gardenia cocktail with the gardenia nicely nestled in a shaved ice "Spanish comb" than a yucky warm cream cheese and fake crab stuffed deep fried wonton any day of the week! But you HAVE stirred up memories! I think I hear a little Martin Denny playing in the background! '-)

(and if you have to ask who Martin Denny is, you're WAAAAAAY too young!)

Sep 13, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics

would you sue for this?

Well, what I was saying is that there is a law on the books in one or more states (at least there used to be, and it's not a law that would likely have been rescinded) that clearly states that you cannot sue anybody -- restaurants, canning companies, frozen food manufacturers, whomever -- for a pit being missed in seedless olives, a bone in chicken salad, or anything that is a natural part of the plant or animal that can normally be expected to be part of that food stuff. You CAN sue for "foreign matter, such as a mouse baked into a loaf of bread, or a cockroach in a salad, but not an olive pit in a seedless olive....

I KNOW there are legal eagles on this board! Come on, guys, speak up....!!! '-)

Using deboned chicken drumsticks as kebabs

Sounds like a serving of duck in a Chinese restaurant! '-)

Just kidding! But it sounds like you're talking about "chicken lollipops" and not deboning for kebab. My problem with trying to use drumsticks for kebabs is trying to debone around that damned long skinny bone (I've called it the "toothpick bone" since childhood) that dictates NOT getting nice chunky hunks like you can get from thighs.

Sep 13, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Using deboned chicken drumsticks as kebabs

I tried it a few years back and the problem I remember most vividly is that it was impossible to get the size of flesh cubes to make fairly uniform kebab chunks as I got with thighs. I also realized it was a lot more economical to just buy thighs in the first place because you literally do get more meat per pound. I don't recall any flavor problems. But it will also have a lot to do with the chicken, as in commercially raised for supermarket distribution or free range organic chicken from somebody's farm, but that type of chicken can give you serious "sticker shock!" Good luck, whatever you decide.

Sep 13, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

The Awful Reign of the Red Delicious

I have eaten red Delicious apples that really were delicious and so juicy it ran down your chin. When you bit into them and pulled away a bite with your teeth there was a satisfying snap. I loved those apples! Their skin was thin and tender. That was in the 1940s. They started to decline, in my experience, sometime in the 1960s. For several decades I would buy 1 or 2 a couple of times a year, only to be seriously disappointed. It has to be at least 20 years since the last time I bought one.

But Red Delicious apples are not the only fruit or vegetable that has had or will have all or most of its yumminess genetically engineered right out of it. Thank you, Agribusiness. NOT! :-(

Sep 13, 2014
Caroline1 in Food Media & News

Kebabs: Mix Items or One Ingredient Per Skewer?

Truth is that threading different items onto a skewer such as a cube of meat, a cherry tomato, a piece of onion, a piece of bell pepper or whatever always looks great in photos but disappoints in real life simply because all of those things have different cooking times. BUT you can par-cook the veggies and have it come out well.

When I bother making kebabs at home, it's usually Adana kebap (tons of recipes on the web and videos on youtube when you Google "Adana kebab") because they're easy to do, everybody loves them, and there is never a problem with tough meat or whatever.

What is "real food"?

So true! And mine was a master electrician! '-)

Sep 12, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics

What is "real food"?

Yeah... Even during WWII, my mom served LARGE helpings to everyone, and if I didn't want to eat it all, I would get a haranguing lecture about my poor cousins in England who were being bombed by the Nazis and didn't have any food to eat. I was a smart ass brat (something I never grew out of) and one day I just slammed away from the table, went and got a shoe box, dumped my dinner in it and told her to mail it to them! She didn't. She continued to make me clean my plate. And I continued to be the poor chubby kid. Mothers can be rotten people, if you don't keep them in check!

True story. <sigh>

Sep 11, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics

What is "real food"?

LOL! "Real food" is ONLY a "first-world concern" BECAUSE all of the underdeveloped and undeveloped countries ARE ALREADY EATING "real food" because that is ALL they have available to them!

Example: I am now 81 years old and in my childhood, the subscribed-to definition of "real food" under discussion here was the ONLY kind of food available. Does anyone here think a 1890s can of Campbell's Tomato Soup had identical ingredients to what it contains today? NO WAY!!! Another example: up until AFTER World War II ended (1945), with the exception of VERY upscale restaurants such as Delmonico's in NYC and a few in Chicago that SPECIALIZED in grain fed beef raised especially for them, in all of the rest of the country GRASS FED organic beef, even butcher shop fancy USDA Prime GRADE dry aged luxe cuts such as Porterhouse and tenderloins, were grain-free grass fed organic cattle BECAUSE the chemical pesticides had not yet been invented and/or put into wide spread agricultural use.

Until AFTER WWII (1945) ALL margarine was plain old Crisco white, and by law could not be artificially colored to look like real butter. That law was to protect the Wisconsin dairy farmers. It was after the war, when all of the "Baby Boomers" were being born, that a food crisis hit America because of all of the returning GIs who were being discharged after the war and that population explosion HAD to be fed. Soooooo... Among other things, the government changed the law and manufacturers o "oleomargarine" were allowed to dye it yellow so it looked like butter and everyone startedd toutinhg itf as healthier than butter. NOT! Cattlemen were also encouraged to raise their cattle in feed lots near slaughter houses on a diet of corn and grain (it makes the cattle sick, gives the cattle high cholesterol problems that it passes on to any living creature who eats it, including man, so most of our beef today is raised on antibiotics to keep the animal healthy while it eats grains AND estrogen (the growth hormone of choice in the cattle business) to bring a steer to market in a year at the size of a full grown steer of yesteryear that took much longer to reach mature slaughter weight.

So in my own definition of "real food," as with most definitions, it is a movement to get back to NATURAL food as it existed BEFORE man and Monsanto started dumping chemicals and pesticides and antiboitics and growth hormones into damned near everything we eat today.

Today's "real food" movement flies under a lot of banners in the U.S. Names such as "The Mediterranean Diet," "The Paleo Diet," and even "Slow Food," which are all variations on a theme. They are cries for help to get back to food that isn't dangerous to our health. And there are some appreciable successes going along with the movements. For example, grass fed beef is becoming more and more common as many independent cattle ranchers withdraw from agribusiness and go out on their own to raise cattle the way nature intended. My heroes!

And here's a bit of trivia for you directly related to that: Did you you know that today it is FAR healthier for you to get all of your good Omega 3s and such from eating a helping of grass fed organic beef than it is to get them from a eating salmon? Because salmon and other "top of the food chain fish" eat all of the fish species smaller than they are, the pollutants that we all eat are concentrated in top of the food chain critters. Grass fed organic cattle have minimal accrued toxins compared to salmon.

Anyway, that's how I see "real food." Well, unless you're in Japan, where most sushi-ya have absolutely adorable and incredibly convincing PLASTIC food on display in the windows outside some shops. In such cases you do, however, get REAL food when you go inside to eat. '-)

Sep 11, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics
2

Best Chef's Knife?

Could be...! '-)

Sep 11, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Best Chef's Knife?

Why do you assume I've never had the opportunity to actually use a really really good sashimi knife? I have. I didn't own it, but its owner did invite me to try it. And as I said, whether it be a single bevel hand folded steel knife that was hand forged by a Japanese master whose ancestor personally made the swords of the greatest samurai who ever lived or a modern "stamped steel" chef's knife, when a home cook needs a super sharp knife to make a brunoise, either knife will do that just fine. '-)

Sep 11, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Best Chef's Knife?

Yup. "Sushi" knives (really sashimi knives) also have a "single bevel" in that the cutting edge does not form a double beveled "V" shape as "western" chefs knives do, because only one side of the blade is beveled in order to keep the slicing motion more true in the process of removing very thin sashimi slices, which may or may not be used for sushi. And a sashimi knife is NEVER steeled on both sides, as western knives are. I have no clue how or if their cutting edge is "tuned up," so to speak, by its owner or whether it is ever "steeled." I suspect honing is the choice, but who does it is unknown to me.

BUT... My point was and is that sashimi knives do not fit into the needs of most professional chefs or home cooks. There is a "conspicuous consumption" status symbol now available in the form of very expensive Japanese style hand forged Damascus steel kitchen knives that promote a VERY old forging method of layer upon layer of heated-hand hammered-tempered layers of different steels that produces the much cherished moire pattern visible on the faces of the blade.

But the FACT is that modern "stamped" steel knives with highly researched and formulated steel compounds can and do perform better overall for the purposes that kitchen knives are used for.

All of which are pretty moot points when it comes to the OP's quest for the best chef's knife for her budget. '-)

Sep 11, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Best Chef's Knife?

It sounds like you've checked your knife out with a lot of experts, but my question is this: Have you talked to Henckels? To me, what you've been told about your knife just doesn't make a whole lot of sense. It sounds to me like a bunch of razzle dazzle that an "expert" uses when he doesn't want to or doesn't know how to do the job. But that's just me. However, a phone call to Henckels couldn't hurt. Or have you already done that? Seems to me they would be anxious and willing to help.

Sep 10, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Best Chef's Knife?

I've never used a whetstone, though some have told me I should. I've always used a steel, but as they say, different strokes for different folks. But I'm also pretty self indulgent when it comes to cooking and my kitchen. Eating is something we all must do for the rest of our lives, so why not make it taste really great and have fun with it while you're at it?

I doubt that I would ever spring for one of those handmade Damascus steel super expensive Japanese knives because I seriously doubt it could cut any better or cleaner than the knives I have now, but... If I was a sushi chef and wanted to hone the mystique of how much better I can slice sashimi than the guy in the sushi-ya down the block I'd probably pop for one. But it still wouldn't cut any better than the knives I have now!

But if I wanted a new chef's knife, I would simply go for it. I figure anything that increases my joy in cooking is a smart investment! Did I mention I'm self indulgent? '-)

Sep 10, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Best Chef's Knife?

Well, it might be worth having your Henkels sharpened professionally and it could be good for another 29 to 30 years. I don't think I could adapt well to a new chef's knife after using the one I have for decades. The combination of types of metals used in making a stainless steel pretty much determines how long and how well it will keep its edge. I'd sure like to know the recipe used in my Sabatier because the first thing I do when I take it out of my knife block is steel it before I use it and ... hmmm...

What kind of steel have you been using on yours? Maybe that's your problem. My steel was made in Sheffield, England around the end of the 19th century. It started out as my grandmother's father's steel, and she brought it with her when she came to this country when my mother was 7 years old. It is the ONLY steel I have ever used on my pet chef's knife. And that could be part of the reason my knife is still in such prime shape after 50 years of use.

But if you're sure you want to go to cheaper knives you might want to check out restaurant supply stores. There are several in my area with all sorts of knives! Good luck with it, but think about having the Henkels restored by a knife professional. Especially if you like the knife!

Sep 10, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Best Chef's Knife?

"The best things" are often things that come to feed your soul through the years. Your Pelikan pen and your mixing bowl. Our Sabatier knives. My oldest child will turn 47 in about 9 weeks and that means my every day china will turn 47 about a month later. Good grief! I've been eating off the same dishes for darned near a half century! LOL! But whether it's huevos rancheros for breakfast or beouf Bouguignon for dinner, it tastes better on that china! shhhhh... My age is showing! '-)

Sep 10, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Electrolux induction range vs. GE Induction range

Well, since I bought this house nine years ago I've done three major things to bring down my electric bill in this all electric neighborhood: I converted to heat pumps (wanted to go geothermal heat pumps, but could not find a knowledgeable installer in the entire DFW metroplex!), I've converted almost my entire house to LED lighting (don't use the upstairs often enough to make it worthwhile), and I do all of my cooking on induction now. Well, except for a little sous vide now and then, and using a gas hotplate when I do Moroccan food. A clay tagine will NOT work on induction...!!!! '-)

Anyway, the LED lighting and induction may not have completely slain the electric dragon but they've pretty much cut it down to size! I have 2 chandeliers -- 1 in the dining room and 1 in the breakfast room -- and between them they require 22 candelabra base light bulbs, which was a pretty penny in converting to LED, but well worth it for me. For the LED can lights and the rest, it DOES help to have a son who is an electrical contractor and believes in giving practical birthday and Christmas gifts like converting 14 ceiling can lights from incandescent to LED.

Unlike people MUCH younger than I am, I don't worry about the long term pays-for-itself kind of thing. (Hey, today is my 81st birthday!) I'm a LOT more interested in cutting down my monthly bills! Induction, LED, and heat pumps have gone a looooooooong way toward that. My first December electric bill in this house was $700.00! That was nine years ago this coming December. My electric bill is currently averaging a tad less than $200.00 a month. (I recently converted to bill averaging with my electric company.) Now I only wish I could find a couple of on-demand induction water heaters to land another blow to the dragon! Last time I checked, those were still only available in Asia. <sigh> My daughter and son in law recently build a new home and it is 100% LED lighting in everything, including the swimming pool lights. She says the thing she loves most is that if she forgets to turn lights off, it does NOT change her electric bill. I tell her they were penny wise and pound foolish because they put in a monster restaurant style 6 burner gas cook top that can heat all of Gnome, Alaska for a winter every time they cook a big meal! Some day they'll start listening to dear old mom... (dream on!) '-)

Sep 09, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware
2

Best Chef's Knife?

Pretty much... I don't usually share my woes, but... Oh, well, here goes:

My original (vintage) fluting knife was lost somewhere along the way in the last decade or so. I THOUGHT I still had it until I wanted to flute a mushroom one day but it was nowhere to be found! That was about a decade ago. So I tried and tried to find one and about gave up, then I stumbled across the one pictured below featured on some web site as "Julia Child's favorite knife" or some such. There was a link to a Sabatier vendor, so I ordered it post haste! I don't remember my original having any markings on the blade quite as flagrant as this, but there you are!

New markings or not, The love affair continues as if it is my original. I find it really strange I can't seem to get the right wrist action with any other knife as well as I can with this one for fluting mushrooms. Curious. I just watched a youtube video a short time ago of a culinary school master chef instructor showing a bunch of chefs-in-training how to flute a mushroom with a freaking meat cleaver!

I guess I need to own up to being a lover of old shoes or whatever. For decades I could only write letters comfortably with one specific fountain pen, I used my Olivetti Lettera 22 typewriter for about 25 or 30 years until I couldn't find ribbons for it any more, and I've used my 10" Sabatier Professional stainless chef's knife every time I have cooked a meal at home since the day I bought it! LOL! I'm sitting here laughing at myself. I'm SUCH a stick in the mud! My god, I hope I have company!!! '-)

Here's a photo of my current knife:

Sep 09, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Electrolux induction range vs. GE Induction range

Makes me start thinking that "vintage" appliances may be a better option.

Well, except for induction. And if I were doing my kitchen all over again today, I would put in those commercial 220v built in units with the 100 presets. I LOVE my single unit. It's like cooking on gas, except with NONE of the heat kicking my electric bill over the freaking moon! '-)

Sep 08, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

would you sue for this?

Damn! When am I going to learn to check out dates before chiming in?

Never mind. :-(

Sep 08, 2014
Caroline1 in Not About Food