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Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

OR a "faucet face!"

about 22 hours ago
Caroline1 in Not About Food

Odd ID situation: when is "Valid" considered not valid enough?

LOL! On reading of your experiences and the age of all of you who were carded, the question occurred to me, "My god! If their wait staff can't tell a 51 year old from a 17 year old, how good can the kitchen staff be at recognizing inedible food?"

When I got to your final comment about the hockey puck eggs, I couldn't help myself. I broke out laughing!

I also must assume that you and your friends have been to bars in Minnesota before and not run up against this problem. Am I right? If so, I just would never go back to that place.

But it also sounds as if the restaurant owner MAY have been sued under the law that says the home owner or restaurant/bar that last SERVED a drunk driver involved in a serious accident with injuries his last drink(s) before the accident may be held equally accountable for the recovery of financial drain on the injured (or dead) parties AND be accountable for paying any punitive damages the court awards. It's commonly called a "deep pockets" lawsuit, and can wipe out a small business and devestate a homeowner.

I don't know a thing about Minnesotta law, but *IF* this is the reason that the restaurant is being so hard a** about carding people, I would think it would be in the restaurant owner's own interest just to simply stop serving alcohol. BUT... there is no law that says you have to be intelligent to own a business... '-)

Anyway, I think it's hilarious that they card the "not kids anymore" crowd AND serve bad food! THAT part is amusing. '-)

about 22 hours ago
Caroline1 in Not About Food

Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

LOL! "He was too dumb to pound sand."

Just another way of saying, "he doesn't know his a** from a hole in the ground." Both of which were sentimental favorites of my retired Navy father right up to age 92 when he died.

To take it back to food, he was "a crusty old salt"! '-)

Aug 28, 2015
Caroline1 in Not About Food
1

Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

There was a song back in the 60s with a lyric, "They're coming to take me away, ho ho, the men in their little white coats!"

Aug 28, 2015
Caroline1 in Not About Food
1

Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

You were a fun kid! And are probably really smart too, because that's the kind of thing smart kids think about! '-)

Aug 28, 2015
Caroline1 in Not About Food

Gift basket from America?

Thanks for the education, guys! VERY helpful!

Aug 28, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Gift basket from America?

Yeah. Peeps come in a rainbow of colors, baby chicks or bunnies, ad nauseum. When my now nearly-middle-aged kids were in elementary school, Peeps became the loves of their lives! If you set them on a paper towel and put them in the microwave, they expand and grow and get bigger and bigger, then they collapse and turn into a paper towel stiff with burnt caramel! Yay Easter Bunny! '-)

Aug 28, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Gift basket from America?

Rats! See? We're homogenized already! '-)

Aug 28, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Gift basket from America?

Let's see if I'm understanding this correctly? For residents of the UK, what you call "pancakes" are what a USA born bloke would call a "crepe," am I right?

I'm using Harter's recipe to base my guess on. In the United States, "pancakes" means leavening, usually in the forms of baking powder AND baking soda for buttermilk pancakes, or simply baking powder or "self rising" flour for regular pancakes.

Harters, except for the water, your recipe *IS* the same as my crepe recipe. I mix mine in my blender, then let it rest for an hour before making crepes, or whatever.

I also use the exact same recipe for "popovers" and Yorkshire pudding, except that for Yorkshire pudding I add a touch of nutmeg to the batter, then about 50 minutes before the standing rib roast is medium-rare I remove it from the roasting pan, leave an ample amount of rendered beef fat in the pan, then pour the Yorkshire pudding batter into the HOT roasting pan and put that on the lower shelf of my (self cleaning!) oven and the roast sits directly on the oven shelf directly over it during the last 40 to 50 minutes of roasting time and drips it's delicious juices ocer the top of the pudding.

Your recipe, without the water, is a fabulously versatile "batter!"

If I'm right, UK and USA really DO speak 2 different languages. And it's not just about bonnets and boots! '-)

Aug 28, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Gift basket from America?

Foxeyblue! You're the perfect one to ask! How easy are Rice Krispy Treats to find in London? If they're rare to non-existent, they might be the perfect answer. They would make postage nearly painless compared to jarred or canned stuff, Even lots cheaper to mail than M&Ms, with or without peanuts. TaDAAAAH!

Aug 27, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Gift basket from America?

Some would say flour, eggs, and buttermilk! '-)

Aug 27, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Gift basket from America?

Maybe it's the Bocuse influence in France? '-)

True story! My second husband was a world traveling troubleshooter for Raytheon's missile systems. When Raytheon sent him from El Paso, where we lived, to Jedda, Saudi Arabia, they also gave him a big fat orientation note book that listed four pages of all sorts of exotic wonderful cuisine from all over the world, all right there within one Saudi city! The night before he left, he insisted we go for Mexican food. He called me from Jedda a couple of days later. I asked him if he'd gone to any of Jedda's exotic restaurants yet? "Yeah, as a matter of fact. several other engineers and I went out for dinner last night." I had mental pictures of tagines or yak butter basted yak, whatever. "Okay. Where did you go????" His answer, "Paco's Tacos." I was so disappointed! But most of Raytheon's engineers in Jedda were very familiar with "good" Mexican food, and they liked most of the Mexican restaurants in Jedda.

On the other hand, a Mexican girlfriend was married to a Raytheon missile engineer, and they were sent to Germany for two years. She said the Mexican restaurants there were good enough to take the edge off her home sickness, but none of them were close to "great."

When I was living overseas, one time my mother sent me a Care Package of 4 CANS of corn tortillas, and some Old El Paso red enchilada sauce. Other than the tortillas being stupidly small in diameter, I did manage to make some satisfying enchiladas. I REALLY wanted to make tacos, but that was when I lived in souther Turkey, and there was absolutely NO lettuce of any kind available! For a California girl, what's a taco without shredded lettuce?

Ah well, at least chicken soup is universal.

Aug 27, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Gift basket from America?

Hate to disillusion you, Harters, but there is no place on planet earth with more contention on where to find "good" or "authentic" or "real" Mexican/TexMex/CalMex/NewMex food than there is in the great American southwest and along the northern frontera of Mexico! In some parts there is a sharp line between where one "style" comes up against another, such as the areas of west Texas that border on New Mexico. New Mexicans glory in sharp, scorchingly hot food, yet you can drive from say, Las Cruces, New Mexico to El Paso, Texas, a distance of about 30 or so miles, and you find a much blander style of Mexican food (but still fairly hot/picante), yet still not what I grew up with and love in San Diego and most of California. Then slip a mile or two into Mexico and expect another change.

The long and the short of it is that there probably isn't any more right or wrong about Mexican food in London, Shanghai, or Nairobi than there is in Tijuana, Santa Fe, or San Antonio. Just "different."

Earlier, I thought about suggesting that Oswin's London friend might love recieving a chile ristra from America. Well, New Mexico, since there is so much discussion about Mexicn food. So I called a couple of New Mexico shops to see if they can ship to London. NOT! They cannot even ship to Canada! Pity because they are uniquely "of the Americas," so to speak.

Here are some pics for those unfamiliar with them. My daughter sent me one of the wreaths for Christmas last year, and I have left it hanging on my front door all year long. Which is like magic because for the first time ever I have not had wasps building nests in the ceiling coves of my front porch this summer! My wreath is untreated, as in not shellacked to make it last longer. They last pretty long without the shelacking, and when they are left "natural," you can also pull the chiles off (as many as you need), wash them, shake out as many seeds as you want rid of, then simmer them until they're soft and rehydrated, slip the skins off, then put them in the blender and you're well on your way to a great traditional red enchilada sauce!

Sorry, Oswin. It's a fun idea but you can't do it. Possibly not even if you hand delivered it yourself! <sigh> Pity.

Aug 27, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Gift basket from America?

Brand new information and you've put things in much clearer focus. Unfortunately, the fact that your friend lives in London REALLY ups your challenge. Yesterday, just out of curiosity, I googled things like "list mexican reataurants in UK. Whoa...! There are TONS of them! Then I checked out several menus to find that not all menus sound equally (are you ready for the "a" word?) authentic!

Next I checked out "sushi restaurants in UK" followed by the menu browsing. (Do I know how to kill time or not!) I found a couple of those that made me wish they had franchises in Dallas!

Then, as others have pointed out, there is damned little in the way of food that you cannot get in today's London! Pogo was right. We have met the enemy and he is indeed us. And he's armed with the internet and homogenizing the whole damned world!

So a couple of more things occur to me. When it comes to gifting in the U.K. (and other countries) you run the risk of giving gifts that can (because of a whole variety of taxes that pop up for the new owner AFTER you give them the gift) that in some cases can cost the recipient more than you paid for the gift! I once gave the young daughters of cousins who lived in Manchester pocket radios, and in UK of that time the result was that I inflated their radio/television in-home tax/licensing fees by a whole lot more than the silly damned radios cost! "Caveat emptor" and then some.

In other words, international gifting can be really tricky, even with some seemingly innocent gifts. so I think you may need some specific advice from a Chowhound such as Harters.

Oh, and if you just happen to be an Amazon Prime member, I *THINK* you can order things on the UK amazon.com website and get free UK shipping, but probably not free shipping to the UK from the USA website.

Good luck! You've taken on a challenge! Hopefully you can dodge all of the bags of worms. '-)

Aug 27, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

And then. to continue with ponies, there's the old "If wishes were horses, beggars would ride."

Grill pan: is it worth it?

Thanks! '-)

Aug 26, 2015
Caroline1 in Cookware

Grill pan: is it worth it?

Sorry you have had such a rough time following what I wrote.

Aug 26, 2015
Caroline1 in Cookware

Grill pan: is it worth it?

hmmmm... I NEVER use any of my cast iron cookware without preheating first, regardless of whether I'm cooking on gas, electric, or induction. If you dont like "starting from cold" on a 2 burner cast iron grill, you won't be any happier starting with a cold cast iron "ridged" grill frying pan!

I also pre-heat my cast iron omelet pans. It's the right thing to do! '-)

Aug 26, 2015
Caroline1 in Cookware

Grill pan: is it worth it?

Maybe I'm missing something, but if you have room to put your handle free grill pan one shelf under, why not just a sheet of aluminum foil instead, then trash it instead of clean up?

Maybe I have missed something?

Aug 26, 2015
Caroline1 in Cookware

Gift basket from America?

So, what did you crave when you lived in France? That's the question.

When I lived in Turkey, I seriously craved a donut shop's yeasty donuts! When I lived in Greece (on the Peloponnesus), it was those small McDonals's hamburgers with the small cubes (brunoise) of grilled onions in them. When I rerurned to the states I bought a dozen of them and stashed them in the freezer for instant gratification. They lasted 2 years! But in today's world: http://mcdonalds.gr/el

My suggestion for the biscuit and gravy potato chips is because:
A. If the gift basket is for an ex-pat living far from the USA, it might be a fun thing to get. They might be gone by the time the ex-pat gets home!
B. If it's a gift basket for a Brit or Irishman, it could be a fun insight into just how crazy some American foods can get!

Life should be FUN...! '-)

Aug 26, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Gift basket from America?

For me, the problem with your question is that you have left out a critical detail: WHO will you be sending the gift basket to? The other factor is that globalization is "homogenizing" the foods of the world so much that people in the UK/Ireland can likely get a whole lot of "American" foods "right around the corner." And then there's the possibility that, depending on the recipient and where he or she lives, you might be able to save a lot of shipping fees by simply sending a McDonald's gift card. Forty years ago I would have immediately responded to your question with "peanut butter," but in today's world, who knows?

That said, Cracker Jacks, microwave popcorn, Lay's Southern Biscuits and Gravy Potato Chips, Hershey with Almonds chocolate bars, a can of Spam... from here, things that come to mind just get heavier.

Aug 25, 2015
Caroline1 in U.K./Ireland

Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

In my neck of the woods it was, "sell refrigerators to Eskimos." In other words, ridiculously useless! But global warming may turn that thought around.

Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

The Popeye picture, for some reason, does not include the full cartoon I uploaded! The Popeye cartoon character has SKINNY biceps and thighs, but BULGING forearms and calfs. When I was little (preschool) I used to wonder what was wrong with poor Popeye! Did he have some strange disease?

Little kids can be sooooo literal!

Aug 25, 2015
Caroline1 in Not About Food

Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

Thanks! '-)

...When you wish upon a star...

Aug 24, 2015
Caroline1 in Not About Food

Grill pan: is it worth it?

Like all cast iron, the secret is in the cure and cleanibg method. I clean all of my cast iron, including my cast iron grills, with table salt. Pour a bunch in the pan and use a paper towel to "scrub" with the salt. Well cured and salt cleaned cast iron is the world's best true non-stick!

Aug 24, 2015
Caroline1 in Cookware
1

Grill pan: is it worth it?

I *LOVE* my cast iron grill AND my cast iron grill frying pan! My gas barbecue was stolen years ago -- the thief dragged it across the back lawn and over the rock wall leaving lots of lava rock to be turned into shrapnell by the lawnmower! That's when I bought the BIG 2 burner cast iron grill and it turned out to be darned close to being as flavorful as the gas barbecue. Then, a few years ago I supplemented it with the frying pan grill because I mostly cook just for me now.

Anyway, the cast iron grill AND ridged frying pan are great multi-purpose kitchen tools. Add an old fashioned cast iron "bacon press" and you can turn out some fabulous paninis! If you ever did grill fish on you gas grill, the cast iron grill will do a good job there too.

But... I am one who loves having the right tool and I don't mind storong things I only use once in a while. I think of them the same way I think of a jack and a tire pump in the trunk of my car... Maybe I'll never use them the rest of my life, but by god, when I need them, there is NO substitute!

Oh, there's one other factor. In most families the males LOVE to take over the barbecue on weekends. Cast iron grills? Not so much!

Think about what will work best for you, and good luck!

Aug 24, 2015
Caroline1 in Cookware

Let's Do Something Different for the Holidays

Sounds perfectly reasonable to me, BUT... ... ... I suspect there will be a LOT of resistance, widiwhood or no, from all of those who have ADORED having you knock yourself out year after year presenting them with a fabulous meal that has left you sitting at the table with tired tastebuds that are too exhausted to taste anything. It's the "holiday component" that Norman Rockwell left out of ALL of his holiday paintings! '-)

And by the way, Big hugs and consolation over your loss. It's a rough one to handle. It sounds like you're handeling things amazingly well, and your husband would be proud of you.

All that said, the first idea that pops to mind for me is what about a "pot luck?" Ask everyone to bring their favorite holliday food and let the chips fall where they may? Hey, if everyone brings fruitcake, at least you'll have something to laugh about for years to come! Or maybe ask a friend to be "secretary of menu," then ask everyone to RSVP to him or her so everyone knows its better if they bring mashed potatoes or a pot roast, and you don't end up with 20 fruitcakes for dinner!

You don't give any information about where you live, what the weather is like, or even whether the group is religiously cohesive or not, but nevertheless, "the holidays" are about giving, so if you have an open minded crowd, it could be fun to get "the whole crowd" to plan in advance to "group" volunteer at a soup kitchen or homeless shelter and spend the day helping to serve the food, then everyone go out TOGETHER for pizza and libations to celebrate feeling good about "giving?"

Or if your group has any military ties at all, and you live near a base, getting your friends and family to HELP YOU with the cooking and inviting some "total strangers in uniform" to come share a meal with all of you? Every holiday season there is a HUGE supply of young recruits who can't afford to go home for Christmas, and would love to have a meal in a family atmoshere.

There are TONS of possibilities, but there may be a lot of resistance from friends and family too. ESPECIALLY if you're a good cook, and it sounds like you are... Whatever you decide, good luck!

Oh, and have you thought about a cruise? Just for you! '-)

Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

Cortesy of Wikepedia:

"Jiminy Cricket is the Walt Disney version of The Talking Cricket (Italian: Il Grillo Parlante), a fictional character created by Carlo Collodi for his children's book The Adventures of Pinocchio, which Disney adapted into the animated film Pinocchio in 1940.[4] Originally an unnamed, minor character in Collodi's novel, he was transformed in the Disney version into a comical and wise partner who accompanies Pinocchio on his adventures, having been appointed by the Blue Fairy (known in the book as The Beautiful Fairy with Sky Blue Hair) to serve as Pinocchio's official conscience. Though called "cricket", he is depicted as a grasshopper instead, being crickets black or dark brown and with very long antennae. Since his debut in Pinocchio, he has become a recurring iconic Disney character and has made numerous other appearances."

If theyd been true to the original book in their animations, we'd all be talking about "Jiminy Grasshopper" becauswe the REAL Jiminy Cricket in the Italian children's book wasn't a grasshopper at all!

But then, what was the martial arts TV series where the karate guy was called "Grasshopper?" Or am I confusing that with a Zen teaching story?

Aug 24, 2015
Caroline1 in Not About Food

Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

BIG BIG BIG mistake on my part about Jiminy Cricket being a character in Dumbo. It WAS Pinocchio...!!!

My apolgies to all, but I'm leaving the post up BECAUSE it is the only one in this thread with a picture of dear sweet Jiminy! Sorry about the slip!

Aug 24, 2015
Caroline1 in Not About Food

Phrases You Don't Hear Anymore

Never heard that one, but there was "Jimenitly" back in the day.

Aug 24, 2015
Caroline1 in Not About Food