Caroline1's Profile

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Home-made caesar dressing vs the OG Cardini table-prepared one?

Thanks for the link, but it made my toes curl! And not even close to how it used to be done. And apparently the salad bowl isn't cleaned between "performances"? Glad it's about sixty years since I ate there... back when a clean, fresh salad bowl was used, along with the original prep method. Think what it must be like by closing time... Sorry! Let's DON'T think about that, Sounds nasty. Sometimes change isn't such a good thing!

Jul 18, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Home-made caesar dressing vs the OG Cardini table-prepared one?

Hey! Thanks for THIS question because in all likelihood, I'm one of the few people left in this world who has actually eaten Caesar salad at Caesar's restaurant on Avenida Revolucion in Tijuana, Mexico way back when. I was a kid -- maybe 12 or 13 (around 1944 or maybe 45), and we were taken to Caesar's Hotel for lunch by house guests from L.A. They made a BIG deal of the salad AND the guy making it, who may well have been Caesar Cardini himself. At least they called him Caesar...? It was an eye opening experience for me; my mother didn't even know how to spell "gourmet," let alone be one, and this occasion was my first knowledge that there was any other kind of lettuce on planet earth besides iceberg! The salad was assembled table side with lots of friendly chat between the guy making the salad and the family friends. I was spellbound and sensed this was a very big deal! So maybe there are a few advantages to being just 10 minutes younger than god after all! The down side is that I was a kid and had little to no real appreciation for the occasion. OR the strange lettuce put in front of me.

The original method of assembly was NOT to make an emulsified dressing using the egg to stabilize the oil lemon juice combination, but instead the egg was used to coat the bare naked lettuce first to ensure that the vinaigrette and lots of freshly grated Parmesan cheese sticks to the romaine. Some claim the egg was coddled (an old cook's trick to re-center the yolk of an egg of unknown age), but why bother if you're just going to break it up anyway? In today's America, only use pasteurized eggs for Caesar's salad!

To toss in a little trivia, along with the purported history of the salad, back in the 1920s Tijuana, Mexico was a huge tourist attraction for Californians, as it still is today. Hey, booze, good food, risqué nightclub acts and bullfights every Sunday! What could be better than that? The traditional history is that in 1924, a bunch of movie stars drove down to Tijuana for a day of fun, then just before heading home wandered into the shutting down restaurant and asked to be served. Most of the staff was gone and the kitchen was shut down, but the restaurant owner -- Caesar Cardini -- felt compassion for the hungry tourists (little doubt he knew who they were) and put the salad together with what was still available in the kitchen. The celebrities returned to LA/Hollywood raving about Caesar (Cardoni's) salad, and the rest is history.

Caesar Cardoni had a brother who was also a chef/restaurateur and a partner in the original Caesar's in Tijuana. Both were chefs and owned restaurants in San Diego as well. So both brothers developed their own way with assembling the salad and making the dressing. I have been taught that the original spur-of-the-moment salad Caesar Cardini threw together kept the romaine lettuce whole in individual spears, and used fork-mashed anchovies in the dressing with no Worcestershire sauce. It was his brother who cut the romaine (who wants to try to eat a whole blade of romaine with a fork? Good show!), and that he used Worcestershire sauce INSTEAD of mashed anchovies in his version of the dressing. Anchovies are a primary ingredient of Worcestershire sauce. Whatever the truth is, it's now shrouded in history and/or myth. Nevertheless, it's still a damned good salad.

Here's the way I've been making it for at least the last half century (or more):

Rub the interior of a large wooden salad bowl with fresh cut garlic to taste.

Add 2 or 3 (or more) hearts of romaine that is well washed, spun dry and sliced with a very sharp knife into 1.5" segments.

In a flat "soup plate" mash 4 or 5 anchovy fillets with a fork. Add about a quarter to a half cup of fine extra virgin olive oil. To that add 1/4 to 1/2 tsp dry mustard powder (not a premixed mustard!), one or two well crushed and mashed cloves of garlic, the juice of about half a lemon or so (there is no vinegar in this salad dressing), some freshly ground black pepper and salt to taste. If you mash your garlic with salt to obtain a paste, take that salt into consideration. Whisk vigorously with a French whisk and set aside.

You will need a cup or two of croutons. You can use store bought or make your own. I usually make my own with cubed crusty French or sourdough bread sauteed in butter (I actually use ghee) and crushed garlic. Either saute them in a frying pan or toss well with the garlicky ghee and spread them on a cake cooling rack set in a cookie sheet and roast them in the oven until your preferred shade of brown and crunchy.

You'll also need a half cup or so of freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (but I do cheat! I prefer Pecorino Romano by far) as well as a fair size chunk of the cheese and a vegetable peeler for later.

You'll also need one or two salmonella free raw eggs, depending on the size of the salad), which is why I only use pasteurized eggs for Caesar salad. Coddle if you wish, but it's not necessary.

TO ASSEMBLE: The lettuce is already in the salad bowl. Now whisk the raw egg with a fork and pour it over the lettuce. Toss the lettuce with salad servers or your bare hands until every piece of lettuce has a shiny coat of raw egg. Re-whisk the dressing if it has started to separate and pour over the salad and toss well. Add lots of the grated cheese and toss again. Now do the same with the croutons. Arrange salad in individual portions on salad plates or bowls and with the vegetable peeler, shave a few curls of cheese onto each plate. Serve.

I often add two or three of those very long very thin imported Italian breadsticks at the top of each plate that have some nice very thin prosciutto or a great paper thin slice of a dry salami wrapped around them.

If you do like Caesar salad, you will likely enjoy this fairly original version. The wrapped breadsticks are my own contribution. Enjoy!

Jul 18, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking
2

Tell me how to cook frozen shrimp

Catherine, if it works for you, by all means, carry on, Julia or no Julia. The problem with your method is that it is not an end all for all sizes and shapes of shrimp. Different strokes and all that jazz.

Jul 13, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Tell me how to cook frozen shrimp

To each her own! This is the method I use for colossal (u15, or about 14 shrimp per pound). I figure as long as it works well for me, why fix it? But then I do tend to do things the old fashioned way.

Jul 12, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Tell me how to cook frozen shrimp

About straight (uncurled) shrimp.... I don't know if it would work well for boiled shrimp... I'll give it a shot next time! But for tempura shrimp, I follow the Japanese tradition of doing several slashes across the inside of tfhe shrimp's body (where the "legs" were) and that keeps them from curling and no need for toothpicks or whatever. You just slash deep enough to keep them from curling... never more than half way through. It's probably not done for shrimp cocktails because without all that crunchy delicious tempura batter surrounding them they would probably look ridiculousl! You could give it a try with one shrimp first and see what you think.

Aha! Google is my friend too...! Here's a video of someone preparing shrimp for tempura....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SOCKz...

Jul 12, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Tell me how to cook frozen shrimp

It sounds like shrimp cocktail is the plan of the day, judging from the sauce/dip you mention. If you've never cooked shrimp before you have to know this ahead of time: First off, they cook VERY fast, and if overcooked they get hard, rubbery, and everyone will hate you! '-)

Here's how I cook frozen shrimp for shrimp cocktails:
Place a fair sized colander in a large bowl, put the shrimp in the colander and place the bowl holding the nested colander in the sink under cold running tap water. Adjust the tap so the water is a gentle steady stream, but not so strong it will force the shrimp out of the colander and overboard. Allow them to "swim" until FULLY thawed! As in limp! A parially frozen shrimp will not cook evenly.

While that is happening, bring a large pot of sea or kosher salted water to a rolling boil.

When shrimp are fully limp, lift colander from bowl of water and drain in the colander. Now get everything "mis en place" BEFORE yyou oil the shrimp!

Throw out the water in the large bowl y ou thawed the shrimp in, rinse and fill with lots of crushed ice and cold water until nearly full. Set near stove. Have a kitchen timer or a stop watch at the ready. If you hae a Chinese "spider" for lifting things out of a fryer, it's a very handy tool, or if your colander is metal, you can also just lower it fully into the pot of boiling water with all of the shrimp having room to move around. Either way will work fine IF the colander will fit in the pan without crowding the shrimp while they cook.

Ready? Okay...

Put the shrimp in the pot of boiling water for 3 mintues. ONLY three minutes! Take them all out of the water as quickly as possible and immediately submerge in the ice water! When they're completely chilled, drain and put them in a zip lock bag and refrigerate until serving time.

For shrimp cocktails on the fancy side, I put some shrimp sauce in a martini glass, then drape the shrimp around the rim, tails outside and pointing down, then garnish with a sprig of parsley and a thin slice of lemon.

However you serve the shrimp, they will be tender and delicious! Have fun! And I hope this reaches you in time!!!

Jul 12, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking
4

ipsedixit's Top 10 Dim Sum

5 looong days ago Ipsedixit asked: Chicken paws?? Paws? What kind of foul fowl are you eating C1?

Sheesh! I replied to this, but the reply is not here and I feel confident it was not deleted by the mods... I've been having computer problems from Hell for waaaaaaaay too long now, but in answer to Ipse....

Dunno where you shop, kiddo, but even my local Asian emporium (99 Ranch Market) has chicken paws right there in the meat department! (Before cooking, please remove the claws for a more delicate dining pleasure).

I've even seen "chicken paws" on a dim sum menu. I suspect (but hey, on a scale of 1 to 10, my fluency in Chinese is about a -273!) it may be a literal translation of the Chinese. I'm sure there are a gazillion Chowhounds around here who know for sure...!!! '-)

Jul 08, 2014
Caroline1 in Los Angeles Area

ipsedixit's Top 10 Dim Sum

We agree, but....! I find the embrace of the corporate euphemism "globalization" has also crept into the food of all nationalities at some level or another. I live in the Dallas metroplex and the blurred or erased borders of ethnic cuisine of ANY culture is badly blurred in this city.

Both here in the Dallas area as well as El Paso, where I lived nine years ago, have several Chinese "super all you can eat buffets" that, according to their menus, offer Chinese specialties exclusively.... SOME of them even offer pizza on their dim sum buffet tables! LOL One in El Paso sets out sushi too, except the extra wasabi paste is served in a BIG bowl that sits right next to the steamer trays of cold vanilla and chocolate puddings )also in the dim sum buffet bar). And yes, I did watch someone serve themselves a bowl of it thinking it was pistachio pudding.

But it isn't just Asian cuisines that are being broadsided by the commercial world of restaurateurs... The last five Greek/Turkish/Lebanese sit-down restaurants I've been to make their tzatziki/cacik with sour cream instead of yogurt. Big yuk!

I've about concluded that if you want authentic anything, you'd better learn to make it at home! Oh, and it's been 5 years or more since I last made soup dumplings, but the method I found most useful is to freeze the soup contents (preferably in those tricky round ice cube trays if you have some) and then wrap the dumpling wrapper around it and let it sit in the steamer basket at room temperature until the ice has melted completely, THEN fire up the wok and steam them.

"Food fusion" is as old as man, but our modern age of planes, trains, automobiles and smart phones means that what used to take centuries (or a great war) now happens in about a week. <sigh> But there are a few side benefits.... 99 Ranch Market has now opened a branch near me, which means I now have a source of fresh/flash frozen sea cucumbers and no longer have to send a husband scuba diving when I want a fresh supply.

I grieve for the massive number of traditional cuisines that have become "polluted by progress." Good thing I like to cook....! '-)

Jul 05, 2014
Caroline1 in Los Angeles Area

Tomato Sprouts Inside Tomatoes: Found any?

And the Compari cultivar is the ONLY tomato I've ever seen do that! They are a late-20th century hybrid, and I suspect that characteristic is related to the hybridization process, as in recessive genes meeting that would never have met otherwise...?

Jul 05, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics

ipsedixit's Top 10 Dim Sum

I'll be sure to let my local dim sum restaurants know they're not supposed to have them on the menu. '-)

Unfortunately, like any other classic dish of any country, the end result is only as good as the cook. My biggest objection to soup dumplings is that the soup is nearly always in my plate by the time I get them due to rough handling in the kitchen!

And actually, most Chinese restaurants make what will sell, and that includes dim sum. Like any other "buffet," its a gastronomic polyglot.

Jul 05, 2014
Caroline1 in Los Angeles Area

ipsedixit's Top 10 Dim Sum

Sheesh! I clicked on this expecting a list of things like chicken paws, steamed pork buns. soup dumplings, garlic sea cucumber... <sigh>

Jul 02, 2014
Caroline1 in Los Angeles Area
1

Tomato Sprouts Inside Tomatoes: Found any?

And now I'm very curious about what kind of tomato that is? It looks like it could be a Compari, which is the kind of tomato that sprouted on me, and that leaves me curious whether spontaneous sprouting is more common in Compari tomatoes than other cultivars. That photo is spectacular as well as bizarre! One strange pregnant tomato! Thanks for the picture.

Jul 02, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics

What types of salt do you keep in your kitchen?

Yes, but on mashed potatoes, not on a protein. Not quite Joel Robuchon mashed potatoes, but well buttered. Some fruits such as canteloupe also enhance a salt's individual characteristics, and of course really good ripe tomatoes! And truffled salt on avocado is a marriage made in heaven! Years ago a friend only ate vanilla ice cream with salt and freshly ground pepper on it. Interesting, but can't hold a candle to salted caramel! I can't think of anything that isn't improved by a touch of salt.

Jul 02, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

What types of salt do you keep in your kitchen?

Kosher salt, my primary cooking salt!
Himalayan pink salt
Hawaiian black lava flake salt
fleur de sel
black truffle salt
white truffle salt
Japanese sea salt (from before nuclear pollution)
mesquite smoke salt
Maldon flake salt (little pyramids!)
And of course, the round blue box for cleaning my cast iron pans!!! I think I'm forgetting some but I'm too lazy to go to the kitchen and look. Salt is good!!!

Jul 02, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking
1

What foods have you made and then decided store bought was good enough, thank you, based upon cost, time, and taste?

The first thing that pops to mind for me is pasta! I fell for the fad and bought a ridiculously expensive pasta machine way back in the mid-70's. The kind you put the Durham flour and water in and let it mix itself, then extrude it in any form you like from lasagna (complete with wavy edges) to fettuccine to elbow macaroni or angel hair pasta. You name it, my machine had a blade for it. And after about two or three months of religious slavery to the damned machine, I finally said to myself, "Self, are we EVER going to have al dente pasta again?" Self discovered it was only possible if I air dried the pasta for two or three weeks. And Self also discovered that there are some pretty fine "artisan" (I hate that word!) pastas out there and absolutely no reason for me to forego pasta cooked al dente the way I like it! Curiously, neither of my kids nor my husband nor any of our many frequent dinner guests back then EVER mentioned missing my home made pasta. Not one!

Crispy home made tacos! I used to make FANTASTIC crispy tacos and have big fun "build your own taco" parties around the pool when we lived in California. The tortillas would get nice and flaky and crispy. Not any more! I don't know if it's the humidity here in the Dallas area or not, but I also suspect that something has changed in the masa harina processing that makes tortillas not crisp the way they used to. I have tried tortillas from every manufacturer and tortilleria in the area, and they're all big flops when it comes to crispy tacos. It's a real bummer, because I LOVE crispy tacos. REAL crispy tacos, not those molded extruded baked things similar to a Taco Bell shell. <sigh> Maybe all I need is time travel?

Greygarious got a chuckle out of me with his quote of Garrison Keillor's gem about the best and worst pumpkin pies not being all that far apart. I DO like a made from scratch with suet pie crust around a deep dish pumpkin (almost chiffon) pie like my mother used to make when I was growing up, but where can you buy really good "leaf" beef suet these days? Most of you guys probably have nooooooo idea what I'm talking about. Oh well. I wonder what you'll be reminiscing about when you're 80? '-)

Cranberry sauce? From scratch! Cranberry, orange, Grand Marnier, and Happy Holidays! But I do have to have some "Ocean Spray" on the table for my son. He learned that at Grandma's house...

Haven't made puff pastry since it became available in my grocer's freezer! Pity, because now I have nice granite counter tops that are perfect for puff pastry: Pack a few bags of ice cubes on the granite for about 30 or 40 minutes before rolling the puff pastry and there's no need to pop it back in the fridge to let the butter firm up again! But that's okay.... I can happily live without the mess.

I still cook almost everything from scratch, including and especially soups. Well, except desserts. Can't trust myself there because I live alone, and if I bake a cake it goes straight to my hips! And I've stopped baking bread from scratch for the same reason... There's some sort of strange math conflict involved with bread: Even though a loaf of home made bread may be the same size as a store bought loaf, it only lasts about 1/4 as long.... hmmmm.... Better to leave the yeast in the freezer!

I'm pretty much burned out on chicken because I don't like the "store bought" varieties, and while I am willing to pay $20+ dollars a pound for grass fed dry aged beef (I don't eat it THAT often) damned if I'll pay $16.00 a pound for free range hand fed family farm chickens! It DOES taste better, but sheesh. HOWEVER! There *IS* a chain of "Hispanic" super markets in my area where I DO buy rotisserie chicken! I don't know where Fiesta markets source their chicken, but they do rotiss them "in house." The fun thing that makes their rotisserie chicken so amusing is that besides "old fashioned" chicken flavor (these chickens have bright yellow fat like home grown chickens with home grown flavor at "crappy chicken" prices!), they skewer their birds "side to side" so they come with the skewer holes running differently than most supermarkets. It would be fabulous if they rotisseried them over live charcoal! (Dream on, Caroline!)

Jul 02, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics
1

Slow cooked cote de boeuf

Different strokes, and all that jazz, so it obviously boils (or broils) down to personal preference. That said, my experience is that slow cooking first (I use sous vide) and then searing/charring last gives a brighter, more distinct flavor. Admittedly I've only charred first and sous vide after one time, but that single experience was enough to convince me not to do it again. For me, that "reverse process" seemed to "wash out" the flavor I had looked forward to. Something like an old Peggy Lee song of decades past: "Is that all there is?"

Jun 20, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Sad to report the passing of Veggo

A great loss to us all. Peter, my thoughts and good wishes go out to you, your mom, and the whole family. May the great joy of having had Veggo in all of our lives conquer our sense of loss.

Out of all of the friends I've made on Chowhound through the years, Veggo is the only one I've met face to face. We had dinner a couple of times during the short while he lived in Dallas, with the promise of more whenever he returned. Somehow the expectation is never that you will survive someone a generation younger than you, but there is comfort in how full a life he led. RIP

May 30, 2014
Caroline1 in Site Talk
7

A Non-Offensive Universally Acceptable Meal

For occasions when it's just a dozen or two of our closest friends, my (now "ex") husband and I would have pool parties for his cohorts at UCSD. Some "personal" diets ran from "kookie" to "bizarre," but a "Do It Yourself" taco party ALWAYS worked! Everyone had free choice on what they turned the ingredients into. The assortment regularly included:
shredded beef (rez deshibrada)
shredded chicken
slabs of grilled eggplant
abalone steaks (if you've never had an abalone fish taco...poor baby!)
asadero cheese
grated cotija cheese
Greek olives
Mission olives
diced red onion
diced green onions
shredded lettuce
Mexican pickled carrots
shredded lettuce
diced tomatoes
cilantro sprigs
guacamole
pico de gallo
soft warm corn tortillas
soft warm flour tortillas

and a gas hot plate for frying and a fire in the firepit for whatever.

Oh, lots of stuff to make S'mores.

People made their own favorite taco variations, burritos, salads, low carb dinner plates, quesadillas, there wasn't much that couldn't be thrown together from the assortment.

I strongly believe that eating together should be great fun. For formal meals, I do NOT want help in the kitchen! Arrive on time, dress nice, and use your napkin! But an "assemble it yourself" party is a whole different ball game and my only rule was, "You are welcome to eat in the Jacuzzi, but if you drop your taco in it, YOU clean it up!. '-)

May 24, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics

What is your handwash routine?

I do like your style! Beats the heck out of yawning and winding an alarm clock!

May 05, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

What is your handwash routine?

What a dishwasher DOES do is use a LOT less water than handwashing, and it pretty much ends passing germs around in the family dead in its tracks! But some homes and apartments don't have them. I got my first dishwasher in 1967 when my son was born and I asked my pediatrician about the best way to sterilize baby bottles, His immediate reply was, "Dishwasher! And the family will rack up the benefit of eating from sterile dishes too!" It's true!

May 05, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Please Help - Urgent Wok Crisis!

I have a wok very similar to yours and other than the "friend" who did this to you deserving to be waterboarded <g> it's a relatively easy problem to clear. Actually, you have two options here: you can recure it in the oven (yes! wooden handles on a wok do just fine in a hot oven, you just wrap the wooden handles in several layers of wet paper towels, then wrap aluminum foil around them so they don't dry out).

To recure it, just follow this video from The Wok Shop in San Francisco. If you don't have fresh chives, the green oart os green onions work fine. And I use wet paper towels on my handles. It will work like a charm!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNPe5-...

May 05, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

If you live in the USA, Tom Colicchio could use a little help from YOU!

You're welcome, and here's hoping Chowhounds help push the petition over the top!

Apr 30, 2014
Caroline1 in Food Media & News
1

If you live in the USA, Tom Colicchio could use a little help from YOU!

I don't know if this is under discussion or has been made known through other threads, but if you live in the USA, and are interested in preserving your right to information about the food you eat, it's origin, whether it's good for you, so is Tom Colicchio, and here's a website you may be interested in:

http://www.foodpolicyaction.org/

The link will take you to both the Food Policy Action website but also has a link to Colicchio's recent TED Talk, which is a good thing (imo) for all "foodies" to watch, no matter where you live. .

I'm not trying to spur a discussion on whether GMOs are good or bad. Certainly nothing I know about is 100% good OR bad, but I do think we have a right to such information, so check out the website and if you agree, please consider electronically signing the petition.

Thanks!

Apr 30, 2014
Caroline1 in Food Media & News

Where can I find plain yellow rice with no seasoning?

Sorry for being so late to this thread. Just to clarify a point here. Absolutely YES! Most "yellow rice" is the result of "seasonings" such as saffron, turmeric (aka "poor man's saffron"), annatto (especially in Mexican rice preparations), etc.

BUT....

Because bans on GMO (genetically modified organisms) foods have only been fairly recent in the U.S., and that as an accommodation to making our fresh produce competitive in the world market of today (many European countries, but especially and notoriously France, ban all GMO produce from their country) there exists the possibility that the restaurant where you ate "plain yellow rice" MIGHT have been serving "golden rice," a gmo rice you can read about here:

http://tinyurl.com/nxg2d48

I don't know when the actual GMO ban in the U.S. became active, but just for the record I thought "GMO golden rice" is worth mentioning. Too bad Sam Fujisaka is no longer with us because he could tell us whether the hysteria over gmo foods is valid in this specific case or not. Monsanto was involved in the initial project, and there is a bit of hysteria attached to the Monsanto name. But I don't think the original Monsanto effort ever went to market because, *IF* I understand the research correctly, Monsanto used a plant gene from daffodils, which are toxic, BUT.... I'm no expert in genetics. Maybe it didn't matter??? However "golden rice 2" has a much improved nutritional value and seems to be grown in China, where it helps prevent a lot of diseases in poor children through its greatly enhanced nutritional profile.

GMOs are an interesting subject... So it seems improbable but not impossible that the OP may have had this in a U.S. restaurant.

Apr 19, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics

Sub shaoxing + sugar for mirin?

That, plus every brand of Shaoxing I've ever used doesn't need any added sugar! Sake with a touch of sugar is what I use, but I try not to run out of sake OR mirin!

Apr 07, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Whats the best way to make hash brown potatoes ?

Kelly's is a no fail recipe and other fats work well too; duck fat, beef suet, ghee, olive oil. If you like latkes just add some grated onion to taste and an egg, stir and fry in thin patties 2 or 3 inches in diameter. Or for an "O'Brien" touch add the onions and some julienned bell pepper. Enjoy!

Apr 07, 2014
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Asking a restaurant for recipe

I have asked for recipes and gotten them, but never by phone. But hey what have you got to lose? The worst that can happen is they hang up on you, right? Take a deep breath and pick up the phone. And good luck!

Mar 30, 2014
Caroline1 in General Topics
3

Unisex bathrooms in restaurants

Then you would hate the (hopefully) recent past (and that's "recent" as in my lifetime). Years ago on my fitst trip outside the USA, my flight passed through (landed for more passengers) at the KLM hub at Schiphol Amsterdam Airport. There was a "slight" mechanical problem, so "through passengers" were given carte blanche vouchers for anything they wanted to eat or drink in the formal dining room. I was so elated to see bathroom doors on one side of the huge dining room. The doorways were at least 20' apart. "Hooray! Just like home!" I naievely thought. When I went through the women's door it was an immediate turn to the right in a 20 feet long hallway, and half way down the hallway was a left turn into... are you ready for this? ... a HUGE unisex bathroom! and of course, the other end of the original 20' long hallway was the door marked "Men" in the main dining room.

But at least the toilets were "water tank with toilet seat" type and not the then-more ubiquitous "bomb sights." It was a learning experience!

Mar 28, 2014
Caroline1 in Not About Food

Addressing people by gender at a restaurant

Wawsanham 1 day ago

Hopefully, those English teachers who distinguish between "who" and "whoever" (in THIS CONTEXT) are dying off at this point! Said by an English teacher.
=====================================

God, I hope not!!!

Mar 28, 2014
Caroline1 in Not About Food
2

Addressing people by gender at a restaurant

It depends... My highschool teachers would have smacked us with a ruler if we used "who ever." However "whom ever" was perfectly acceptable.

Just for the record. '-)

Mar 28, 2014
Caroline1 in Not About Food