Caroline1's Profile

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Do you substitue sour cream for plain yogurt?

It sure is!

Have you ever drained regular yogurt to make your own "Greek" yogurt? Personally, I don't like the U.S. versions (is Danon a U.S. company?) of "Greek" yogurts. Instead, I just line a colander with plain white paper towels, then dump a pint or more of regular low fat or fat free yogurt into it, top it with another paper towel, set the colander over a bowl and put it in the refrigerator for three or four hours for "Greek" yogurt, which is really a drained or bagged yogurt and common throughout the Middle East. If I want labneh, the Middle East version of cream cheese or mascarpone, I just let it drain longer, like overnight, and it will drop enough whey into the bowl to leave a really thick "cheese."

You can do the same thing with whole milk yogurt, but I enjoy the flavor of the nonfat yogurt and it has an equal amount of good bacteria in it. Besides this method produces the flavor and texture of drained yogurt (aka "Greek" yogurt in the U.S.) that I remember eating in those countries.

You can even drain the labneh until it's super super dense, then roll it into balls (flavor it if you wish with herbs or spices) and then store it in a small mason jar submerged under olive oil much the way that Italians preserve fresh buffalo mozerella in oil and herbs. It will keep that way for up to a year, but the flavow will get stronger and stronger. Well, probably not so much with cows milk yogurt, but in the Middle East they make yogurt with any kind of milk you can t hink of, from sheep and goats to camels. But it is also fabulous on breads like pita, naan, or English muffins or in a sandwich. I never seem to stay away from it long enough for it to age and mature under oil, so why waste the olive oil for only a few days? '-)

Fun stuff....!!! Oh, and just for the record, the "brand" of plain fat free yogurt I like to use most is Walmart's Great Value fat free plain yogurt in the big/tall tub. If they ever quit making that stuff, I'll be in BIIIIIG trouble because none of the other brands work as well! For my taste buds anyway.

about 3 hours ago
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

TRUE Induction MAGIC!

Okay, I *MAY* be grasping what you are getting at a little better now. Maybe! The ONLY wood stove I've ever seen anyone cook on belonged to my great grandmother, and she died before I was old enough to cook on it. But I HAVE cooked on a full masterly "vintage" gas stove that even had a full salamander in it, I've cooked on just about every kind of electric stove, cook top, single burner electric radiant coil and ribbon hobs as well as induction. I've had gas stoves, butane stoves, I've lived where I was forced to cook on our kerosene space heater in the winter time, I've cooked (full time) with an alcohol stove. And it is true. For at least the last fifty years I ALWAYS put a large pan of water on any cooking hob/surface that is new to me and scope out the boil pattern to see if and where the bubbles rupture and break away from the bottom of the pan first. Works for me! I'm gonna keep doing it. The ONLY cooking method I know of BESIDES my new 100 preset Vollrath that would give me an even heat under a pan up until now was a ban marie or a double boiler. I'm old now, and carrying around heavy pans of boiling water will NOT get me a McDonald's coffee scald award, so I just avoid doing such things if my housekeeper isn't around to do it for me! '-)

Happy cooking, Big Kahuna! I KNOW you LOVE retro! We'll see how much you still love it when global warming starts melting your socks! '-)

POST SCRIPT! I do have one other kitchen appliance that DOES hold a uniform temperature for as long as I want it to and that is my Sous Vide Supreme. But I' am too lazy and not interested in trying to temper chocolate in it! Not that I plan to temper chocolate any time soon on ANY appliance!

about 3 hours ago
Caroline1 in Cookware

What is it?

Ain't nothin' wrong with that!

I'll tell you a story -- just between you and me because I've told it here before. Years ago I taught some cooking classes designed for newly divorced or widowed people who had NOT been the cook of the family. It was VERY basic, like "take the egg out of the shell BEFORE you add it to the cake batter." The great fun of it was that students often invited me to dinner parties they had screwed up the courage to host. One guy made the most unusual (waaaaaay back then!) salad dressing from a recipe he'd clipped from a newspaper. The recipe called for yogurt and garlic and green onions and other spices I no longer remember. He did not know there is such a thing as PLAIN yogurt, so he picked up a large carton of strawberry yogurt. Others made fun of him, but I think he was a trend setter forty years before its time. How common are salads with fruit in the dressing today?

Keep your creativity going! Sounds like you're on a roll. So again, how did it taste?????????? '-)

about 3 hours ago
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

TRUE Induction MAGIC!

I have NO idea how to reply sensibly to what you've written. WHY do you think all induction units share the same configuration? Or is that not what you think?

A "doughnut' is simply the best SHAPE to put a magnetic coil in for this application. But a magnetic coil can be fairly complex and for example, in a nuclear magnetic mass spectrometer there are multiple magnetic coils arranged in a manner that focuses on the specimen placed inside the rings of focused coils for the mass spec analysis.

In the new "cook anywhere" high end designs of induction cook tops there is a whole network of smaller "doughnuts" arranged in a side-by-side-by-side-by-side blanket network that spreads below the entire cook top area and has an ultra sophisticated "brain" that follows a pot or pan all around the cook top's surface and keeps the temperature settings in effect for that particular pan, NO MATTER where it is placed on the surface.

Some induction designs have a "double doughnut," one on the inside and a larger one on the outside that lay "flat", one inside the other beneath the surface of the hob. SOMETIMES one of the induction coils -- inner or outer -- may stop working for whatever reason. A short? A burned out circuit board? Because it hates the cook? Whatever.

Anyway, I don't know how to answer your "Car, c'mon, an induction doughtnut.... .... ...."

Sorry. Maybe I'm just stupid? '-)

about 4 hours ago
Caroline1 in Cookware

Do you substitue sour cream for plain yogurt?

LOL! And bon appetite to you too...!

I suspect it's my age talking. I mean, I'm 8 days away from my 81st birthday and bought myself an "I'm older than dirt" coffee mug because I love it and was afraid no one I know would have the guts to buy it for me! My point is I learned to make all of these Greek and Turkish and Middle Eastern dishes MORE THAN A HALF CENTURY AGO!!! <yikes!>

My god, I went to a Turkish recipe website (in Turkey, and I still do read a bit of Turkish, but when you don't use a language for fifty years or more, it acts like cast iron and rusts away!) Anyway, the BIG shock on the Turkish recipe site was the number of MEXICAN recipes! Mexican recipes in Turkish! Which really isn't that different than Turkish recipes in English, but still... Maybe I need to check out some websites in Mexico for good Greek recipes? FUSION....!!! I hate it with a passion because the internet is making it happen faster than ever before and homogenizing the whole darn world in the process!!!! <sigh> Kaiseki hot dogs anyone?

about 6 hours ago
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

TRUE Induction MAGIC!

I seem not to have made myself clear. When I reduce the level of magnetic excitement to my cast iron pans to drop the temperature from a hard boil to a simmer, my cast iron pans seem to "follow directions" with amazing rapidity compared to how they performed on gas or radiant electric.

Induction ready stainless steel CAN be "fast," but it is never as fast as cast iron or DeBuyer Mineral B simply because NO stainless steel can carry the ferrous properties at the density of cast iron or Debuyer's 99% pure iron. That's the basic rule of nature when it comes to magnetic fields, and that is what induction does: creates heat in a pan with ferrous metal properties by exciting the atoms so they vibrate and the pan itself creates heat, which is very similar to what microwaves do to food, but not exactly the same.

When I bought my Max Burton, I also bought one of those "induction interface disks" so I could use my copper pots and pans. What a waste of money! Well, it's not if you like slow motion. I think it's been out of the drawer twice since I bought it, and when I want to use my copper, I use it on my butane hotplate. Works like a charm!

I DO use stainless steel on induction, but it is slower than cast iron/pure iron. Oh, and by the way, if you don't want something to continue to cook after you turn off induction, then move the pan off the hot spot on the induction hob. I have a wood trivet I move mine to when I want it to quit cooking relatively fast.

I think the most important thing here is that we are all happy with the way we adapt to anything new in the kitchen.

As for boiling water to check out heat patterns on a stove, that's something I've been doing for about fifty years or so now. ANYTIME I move or buy a new stove or hot plate, the first thing I do is put on a large flat pan with an inch or two of water in it. In my 50 or so years of doing that, I've learned that ALL "hobs", be they wood, coal, gas, electric, alcohol, kerosene, propane, or induction DO have "hot spots" and "cool spots," (both relative terms) and I need to know where they are so I know how to rotate a pan when I'm cooking something sensitive like an omelette or browning meat chunks for a stew. Maybe that's just me, but I find it an old and very valuable habit. I suspect we think alike. '-)

about 6 hours ago
Caroline1 in Cookware

What coffee to use in my Bialetti espresso maker?

As others have already pointed out, the Bialetti does not make espresso. The Bialetti is a "moka pot" widely used in Europe because it can make coffee SIMILAR to espresso. It was invented in the 1930s when there was no such thing as a true home espresso machine and commercial machines were ghastly expensive! Some say they get a little crema with their Bialetti, but that was never my experience with mine. The classic Bialetti moka pots are made of aluminum, and for that reason I abandoned mine years ago because of corrosion problems. An added problem in many of today's kichens is that they will not work at all on induction. But they do make updated models that do. I do now have a true "super automatic" espresso maker (Jura Capresso from Switzerland) that I love dearly, but there were a lot of years between it and my Bialetti.

As for what coffee beans to use, whether in a Bialetti or a true espresso machine, use the kind of coffee that you like. However, if you purchase a burr grinder be cautious with very dark roasts because dark roasting can produce a very oily coffee bean that can eventually clog a burr grinder, but they work perfectly well in a "spice grinder" type of machine.

An Italian friend scoffs at any coffee beans or ground coffees labeled "espresso." She says that in the part of Italy she came from "espresso" is a METHOD of making coffee and not a type of coffee. She also says that all of the espressos she remembers (she's an American now) were medium roast coffees because dark roasts tend to be bitter. But she came to this country a long time ago and "fusion" is turning all traditional foods and recipes on their ear! <sigh>

Short answer: Use whatever kind of coffee YOU enjoy!!!

about 12 hours ago
Caroline1 in General Topics

What is it?

I think its called "glop." How did it taste?

about 13 hours ago
Caroline1 in Home Cooking
1

TRUE Induction MAGIC!

I'll vote for that!

about 16 hours ago
Caroline1 in Cookware

Home made hummous just not as good as restaurants

Hummus is traditionally served warm or room temperature as a meze. It's only in America I have ever encountered it cold, as in served from the refrigerator.

There's nothing wrong with refrigerating hummus *IF* you bring it to room temperature before serving. Traditionally, it's always served with a heavy drizzle of olive oil over it. Sometimes the olive oil is intentionally pooled in an indent in the middle of the hummus, sometimes a cross shape is dragged across for the olive oil, and sometimes the moat around it. It is most often topped with a sprinking of freshly chopped parsley, or in some Middle Eastern countries. woth dill or mint or both.

The OP remarks on home made not tasting as good as bought. I suspect that is because it is now allowed to mellow and meld the flavors. I first learnedd to make hummus from a chef when I live in Turkey, and the traditional method does NOT produce "diet food." A LOT of evoo IN and ON hummus! And a mild bite from the fresh garlic. I would be afraid to heat a really authentic hummus in fear it might break. It is not a cooked dish, but always made from "raw" ingredients. I would be afraid that getting it too hot would cause it to break.

There are a lot of variations on dips made with tahini as an ingredient that Americans seem to call names like "eggplant hummus" or "red pepper hummus" and a lot of other "hummuses," but those are ALL called by different names in the Middle East. For example, nearly all "eggplant hummus" I've ever run across is simply babba ganoush. Oh well, it's probably all part of "globalization," and there is nothing we can do to stop that! <sigh>

about 16 hours ago
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

What kind of restaurant has the highest profit margins?

I followed the case quite closely at the time because Robert Scott, the judge who heard this case, was also the judge for my divorce. How respected is/was he in the Albuquerque legal community? Well, I could not find one single top rated attorney in the entire city of Albuquerque who would accept my case to be heard by him. THAT should tell you something.

Now, as to what I remember of the case and what is reported in current available on line "histories" of the law suit today don't exactly match. But also keep in mind that history is always written by the victors! That said, here's the gist of what I remember:

The trial was a JURY trial, and she had some brilliant attorneys. They collected tons and tons of data, which included the information that McD's was the ONLY chain restaurant that served coffee at 190F while others served theirs 15 to 20 degrees cooler; that McD's had been loosing multiple lawsuits per year for many years that averaged from $60,000.00 to $200,000.00 per lawsuit, as I recall, plus attorney fees, but despite those losses, McD's obviously considered those costs negligible when stacked up against its billion dollars a year sales in coffee in the U.S. alone.

In argument, her attorneys readily admitted that it was the plaintiff's own fault that she spilled the coffee, BUT that had the coffee been the temperature of other restaurants, she would not have suffered 3rd degree burns that required hospitalization, skin grafts, and that caused insufferable pain. They also argued that because Mcd's caters to families with children through McD's playgrounds in most of their facilities, it was reckless child endangerment to serve coffee that hot in the presence of kids. They asked the jury to teach McDonald's a lesson they would FINALLY listen to by awarding the million dollars (I forget the exact amount, 3 million???) in punitive damages. And the JURY did exactly that!

BUT....!!!

Dear Judge Robert Scott stepped in, slapped gag orders on the plaintiff and her legal team, then negotiated with McDonald's to change their serving temperature for coffee universally if he reduced the award. He set the JURY'S DECISION aside, and went for it. So did McDonald's.

At that time, I knew a fair number of attorneys, both in Albuquerque, the state of New Mexico, and in El Paso. I can't recall a single one of them singing praises to Judge Scott.

It bugs me that Robert Scott comes out a hero in most reportage today. Being a judge IS a hard row to hoe, but there should be a way built into our legal system to knock 'em off the bench when they get too out of line. Robert Scott is not the only judge to fit that bill. Unfortunately. <sigh>

about 16 hours ago
Caroline1 in Not About Food

Do you substitue sour cream for plain yogurt?

Well, I've lived in Greece and in Turkey, dined widely in restaurant's and local friend's homes, and NEVER EVER was I served tzatziki/cacik made with sour cream. EVER!

But I also have to add that I long ago concluded that Greeks who open Greek restaurants in this country immediately forget how to make authentic Greek food the second their feet touched American soil! I have never had great spanakopita or tiropita in any restaurant in this country. Or baklava, for that matter. So I make my own. :-)

about 18 hours ago
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

What I Learned After Taking a Homeless Mother Grocery Shopping

What a great thing you did for those kids! Yay for REAL cooking!

Do you substitue sour cream for plain yogurt?

Poor baby... '-)

1 day ago
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Do you substitue sour cream for plain yogurt?

That may be, but it will NOT make a recipe that calls for yogurt TASTE like it was made with yogurt, and for me, that's the rub.

1 day ago
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

Do you substitue sour cream for plain yogurt?

There is a HUGE flavor difference (to me) between tzatziki made with yogurt and tzatziki made with sour cream. The sour cream version is "heavier" and I find it cloying. It also lacks the health benefits that yogurt provides via lactobacillus content. In my area there are some Middle Eastern restaurants that serve tzatziki made with sour cream. I've never dined at one of them a second time.

Yogurt has special qualities that sour cream simply cannot match. In the traditional Indian recipe for tandoori chicken, for example, the yogurt not only contributes to the flavor profile of the marinade, but also contributes as a tenderizer.

In my book, yogurt and sour cream are NEVER interchangeable. And for the record, I strongly prefer sour cream to yogurt on my baked potatoes. Along with butter and chives and grated cheddar and maybe some really good crumbled bacon... '-) Miss Piggy lives!

1 day ago
Caroline1 in Home Cooking

TRUE Induction MAGIC!

I do handle my cast iron pans differently than my other pans. The other pots and pans do go in the dishwasher. Cast iron? NEVER! After use, they are cleaned/scrubbed with table salt, wiped with a THIN coat of peanut oil, wiped again and put away. Not everyone subscribes to my method, but it works for me and has for 6 or more decades. My 10" skillet is a hand-me-down that passed age 100 a few years back and is still going strong. Oh, and yes, I do preheat most of the time. For a slow sweat of diced veggies I usually don't bother.

As for ceramic coated cast iron, as in Le Creuset and the rest, it never has been my first choice for frying. My go to choices are uncoated but well cured cast iron or my wok, depending on what I'm making. For deep frying, it's a saucepan and a thermometer, or my wok. But these are what work best for me. Most cooks eventually figure out what works best for them. Lots of room for variety and trial and error. Who knows? In the end you may find Le Creuset isn't working all that well for you, or you might master it and love it for the rest of your life! '-)

Aug 31, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

TRUE Induction MAGIC!

Well, the problem is that enameled cast iron will NOT be as responsive as "naked" cast iron simply because the coating is a good thick layer of vitreous china, aka "porcelain," inside and out. Porcelain is a non-conductor as well as an insulator, so that would be the most likely cause I can think of as to why your experience with your Le Creuset is not the same as my experience with buck naked cast iron. Different animals! '-)

I think I worded something wrong in my mention of how much more responsive cast iron is than other induction friendly metals such as stainless steel, so let me see if I can clarify. I did not mean that my cast iron pans cool faster when used on induction than it does on traditional heat. But it does seem to "follow" a reduction in temperature more rapidly. And I'm not talking about 400F to no magnetic excitation at all. But it does adapt more quickly than my other pans if I reduce the "heat" from a boil to a simmer. Maybe it's an illusion or maybe it's because the iron is responding to the change in magnetic excitation more acutely than my indfuction ready stainless steel pans do. I'm no scientist, but I'm usually a pretty good observer.

As for how I use my Le Creuset (or any enameled cast iron) fry pan, I don't. I set my 12" Le Creuset 1958 model turquoise Le Creuset frying pan on fire about 40 years ago now. We were still living in De Mar, it was Good Friday, and CBS? was presenting a feature length Charlie Brown movie on TV for the first time ever. The kids wanted to watch, so I said they had to take a nap if they wanted to stay up until 10 o'clock. When it was getting close to wake-up time, I decided to make tacos for dinner snd we could eat family style during the movie. I put a good inch of peanut oil in the Le Creuset to fry the tortillas, turned the burner on, then remembered I had to take a medication NOW! So I dashed into the bedroom to take it, the phone rang, I forgot about the pan, and when I came out, the kids were still sound asleep, but my kitchen wasn't! It was burning!

I put out the fire, called the fire department for help with getting the smoke out of the house, and the kids slept through eight firemen with LOUD walky talkies, the sirens of the fire truck, the smoke control unit, and the fire chief's vehicle! Our insuranc company paid for evertything -- restoration, new floor, new stove, painting the interiors, brushing the soot out of the cypress ceilings, but... they would NOT pay for the Le Creuset frying pan because that was where the fire had started!

Anyway, since I bought the set of Le Creuset in '58, as pieces have been retired for one reason or another (or cremated), I've never given replacing them a second thought. If I was much into outdoor cooking over a campfire, I would probably pop for an enameled cast iron dutch oven, but hey, at my age I'm not going out where wild animals can try to nibble on me. No way! '-)

Aug 31, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Just a comment/question

I lived in Las Vegas for four years waaaay back in the Rat Pack days but I suspect the culture hasn't changed that much through the years. The locals, even those who love great food, tend to leave the hotel and casino food for when it's obligatory when out-of-towners decide to use you as a free hotel. (You would be amazed at what people who chatted with you at your brother-in-law's summer bbq five years ago can expect of you in hospitality! Been there, done that, and the tee shirt says, "Free loaders suck!") <g> Conversely, visitors, tourists, and high rollers tend to be out to "have it all" and not very interested in sharing things on a site such as Chowhound. But they probably post tons of phone photos on Facebook and Twitter! '-)

Aug 31, 2014
Caroline1 in Las Vegas

TRUE Induction MAGIC!

yes, it's 1800 watts, which is the maximum for counter top small appliances on a 110/120 volt U.S. standard home power line, but I could have a 210v power outlet installed in my kitchen for 220v European/Asian counter top appliances.

Even though All U.S. built-in electric stoves, cook tops, and ovens are 220v, on induction cook tops and stoves it's pretty much the norm that 1 or 2 of the hobs will not exceed 18 watts drawing power, leaving only 1 or 2 that will reach 400+F. The 1800 watts is what sets the 400F heat max for portable induction units, but its not a standard for all portable units by any means! I've seen some induction portables that draw as little as 1200 or 1300 watts, and for me that would mean deep frying more than one tempura green bean or French fry at a time would leave a LOT to be desired!

I have no idea what the maximum cooking temperature is for the fairly new and very innovative "cook anywhere" built in induction cook tops is. Guess I'll have to research it one of these days.

Aug 31, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Stovetop Cooking: by temperature or power?

So far a 12" diameter pan is the largest, with no discernable problems. I've written a lot about it here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/987590

Aug 31, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

duck press

Yeah, they do! And if you were lucky, your grandmother always gave you a chicken foot to play with. My brother and I each got one, then used it to see who could pull the tendons/ligaments best to make the claw grasp and hold a stone. Hey, dinner and an anatomy lesson all in one fell swoop!

Aug 31, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

TRUE Induction MAGIC!

Well, I almost went with an induction cook top about 8 years ago when I did a kitchen remodel, but I (stupidly) did not want to give up my copper pots and pans. Dumb! Really dumb! I have a portable gas hot plate I use for power failures, so it wasn't like I could never use the copper again. In fact, I still use a copper pan and the butane table top stove to make risotto because my electric risotto stirrer requires a deeper pan, and there is no way I'm going to stir rice for 20+ minutes at my age! '-)

Anyway, at first I did buy several induction-ready stainless steel pots and pans for the Max Burton, including the large sauciers I mention above, but as time has passed and I've gained experience with induction I find I rely on my cast iron more and more because of its phenomenal reactiveness to induction. I've even gone so far as to buy one small DeBuyer Mineral B pan to just get a feel for it because it's made of 99% iron (cast iron is really a form of steel) and is therefore more resistant to rust. So I'm on the lookout for maybe 1 Mineral B saucepan, but an 11" no-handle deep fry pan is as close as they make. Not even a Mineral B dutch oven! <sigh>

The most important thing I've learned from 2 years of cooking on the Max Burton is that the higher the ferrous metal content of a pan, the quicker it will respond to both heat increases AND decreases. For that specific reason I find myself using my old cast iron collection as often as possible because "induction-ready" stainless steel is like putting a governor on a Porsche! If you want speed, use the right model, whether saucepan or a car.

The most surprising thing about cookware that I bought before induction was readily available is that my "new" favorite stove top steamer is now my 14" nested stainless steel mixing bowl with a dime store "basket steamer" inside with the lid from my largest stock pot. Who knew that stainless mixing bowls would be induction friendly? Oh, and I also get great results with my ancient 1950s turquoise Le Creuset on induction.

I'm not one who much cares for "matched sets" of pots and pans in my kitchen, or knife sets, for that matter. I have a warm and friendly collection of individual items that each have special qualities I cherish. Like who knew my mixing bowl would pinch hit as a fabulous steamer? But I did have to go with a new induction ready pressure cooker, and I can't say I miss the hiss and wobble of my old pressure cooker's petcock!

Yesterday morning I made a peppers and potato fritata stove top and decided to turn it with a spatula instead of finishing it in the oven. The spatula wasn't quite big enough for the job and I ended up sloshing half cooked fritata all over the place! Through the magic of induction, the only cook top surface that was hot was directly under the pan so clean-up was a simple 1 paper towel project! But I've got to get a larger spatula! Maybe a big fat round one designed for pancakes? Yeah! I need one of those!

So what are your favorite pots and pans?

Important addendum! You ask how my cooking has changed? Not at all, basically, if you're talking about favorite recipes and such. I have just about every modern cooking method available to me, including a Souse Vide Supreme and a GE Trivection oven that has roasted a 25 pound stuffed turkey for a family Thanksgiving in well under 3 hours! It can use thermal heat, convection heat, and microwave all at the same time to produce those results.

I guess you could say I was cursed with an over-achiever bent at birth, so if anything interests me (and good food does!) I tend to go all out or nothing. "Nothing" undoubtedly would have been kinder to my waistline! '-)

Aug 31, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

duck press

Whoa! Whoa! Whoa! Just my opinion, but I wouldn't press a duck in a wooden press a second time! Nonporous metals have a HUGE advantage here such as not carrying over flavors, but even more critical is sanitation. That, plus I'm not convinced a wooden press would be up to the task. Juice from apples or grapes, yes. Blood and marrow from the ultra rare bony sinewy carcass of a duck? I don't think so!

Secondly, if one doesn't have access to a freshly strangled Rouen duck that is NOT drained of it's blood in the plucking/cleaning process, pressing a commercially processed duck can never produce the required quantity of "duck juice" a pressed duck recipe calls for. On the other hand, if you have a duck pond in your back yard, carry on! Just don't press your duckies in a wooden press! If it would work well, Chef Frederic at Tour d'Argent would have commissioned one way back then!

And by the way, the recipe for "Duck in Blood Sauce" (Tour d'Argent) is not at all as weird and unusual as many recent articles about pressed duck make it out to be. Blood was a common thickener for gravies and sauces in both haute cuisine and home cooking until meat and poultry production became so heavily industrialized post WWII. I can remember my great grandmother catching the blood from poultry for sauces when she killed her own birds when I was a young child. She was a GOOD cook. And all home cooks of her day were ATHLETES!

Aug 31, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

TRUE Induction MAGIC!

Yup! It is now sitting proudly atop my locked GE no-knobs glass cook top so it is directly under the vent. I've only been using it for a few days now, but I've also been making it jump through hoops, so to speak. It is designed for "front of the house" fancy-schmancy restaurant commercial use, therefore one of its features is that when you turn it on, it starts at exactly the same temperature it was set at when you turned it off. Handy if you're going from table to table making crepe Suzette all night long.

My portable model does have a three hour safety cut off that the "built in" models don't share, but it's easy enough to change the temperature a degree or so if I'm making stock or something else that requires a long time. Actually, it would be a lot easier to simply cycle it on/off to reset the auto-off since it does come back on at exactly the same temperature.

It seems quieter to me than the Max Burton is/was. (It's now sitting forlornly on a pantry shelf.) The first link I give above describes the "G4 engine" and how it is superior to the standard single IBTG switch design of most induction "architecture." That promotional page also says the unit will perform at temperatures ranging from 80F to 450F, but my portable unit (1800 watt) tops out at 400 degrees, which is all i need and then some. It can sure make a clean and empty cast iron pan smoke like a chimney until all of the oils in its pores are turned to carbon! '-) And THAT will just make my cast iron skillets all the more non-stickier!!!

One of the tech-ier things I've done is put a very large 14" sautier on it with 2" of water in it and watched the patterns that formed as it came to boil. Did you know that convection currents in heating water roil clockwise in the northern hemisphere just like water swirling down a drain? See what I learned watching water boil? But I learned more than that. I was investigating its thermal nuances! I CAN "super fine tune" a simmer temperature on this in subtle increments like a gas burner, and because it has 100 presets it is a steady heat that does not automatically switch off and on to achieve an "over all" temperature the way the Max Burton does. It really is a whole different ballgame when it comes to steady heat at all temperature settings.

Now, if induction designers at the global level would just put their proprietary profit margin orientations aside and design me an induction cooktop that works with nonferrous metals like Japanese induction architecture with a "cook anywhere" surface that follows a pan around that a few U.S. mfrs are now offering, how great would that be!!! Chefs would love it! Can you imagine a restaurant flat top that only heats the pans and not the whole kitchen? WOW! I'm sure it's coming. Unfortunately "soon" is pretty improbable... <sigh> But until then, YAY Vollrath!

Meanwhile, if you have more specific questions, just ask! :-)

Aug 31, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Do you like induction cooktops? Details, please.

Only 16 months late to the OP's questions, but I just posted this that some may find useful"
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/987590

Aug 30, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

Stovetop Cooking: by temperature or power?

You might find my comments here useful: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/987590

Aug 30, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware

TRUE Induction MAGIC!

Yup. I did it! I've been cooking on a Max Burton induction single burner unit for about two years now. Where I live (Plano, TX) what I save on my electric bills (all electric house) makes cooking on a single burner well worth my while. But for quite some time now, I've been lusting after this little puppy:
http://vollrath.com/Vollrath/Press-Ro...

And if it sounds interesting, the absolute best price is here:
http://www.katom.com/175-59500P.html

So after months of debate with myself over installing a built in GE 30" induction cook top that would fit perfectly into the cut-out in my granite island or go with a bigger and better counter top unit, I decided to go with the Vollrath.

Why? Well, the GE units have the most presets of any American made built in I know of. A preset means that is how many "preset" temperature settings a "burner" will have between its lowest and highest possible temperature settings. The GE built-in has 19 presets, the highest I know of. But the Vollrath has 100!!! Yes. ONE HUNDRED PRESETS! It ranges from 80 degrees to 400. When you use Fahrenheit it progresses up the thermometer in 10 degree increments and the equivalent of that in Centrigrade, BUT when you "cook by numbers," you get the full 100 presets to dance through, which really does give me the temperature fine tuning of gas. I can temper chocolate without the hassle of a double boiler/bane marie. I can slap on my cast iron grill and CHAR me some steaks! This is a commercial unit designed for the restaurant business, and it is larger than the Max Burton was by a few inches in size.

I loved my Max Burton. There is no way I would EVER go back to cooking over radiant heat, whether wood, charcoal, gas, or electric! Who needs to heat up the whole house when you can just heat up the pan? Texas summers get pretty hot, and what with global warming there's not much chance they're going to get cooler as the years roll by. Even if I was rich enough to build my dream home that is an underground house counter-sunk into a cliff overlooking an ocean with windows al la James Bond's Dr. No (I think it was Dr. No who had the huge aquarium wall that looked out into the ocean?), I would still go with induction. Except then, with THAT kind of budget, I would have 4 or 6 or 8 of these puppies installed side by side along a sweeping granite island!

http://vollrath.com/Ultra-Series-3500...

All that's left for me to do now is remember to buy that damned Power Ball winning lottery ticket and pick myself up an extra 2 or 3 hundred million dollars! Hey, I can dream, can't I???? '-

)

NEVER had a problem dreaming big in my entire life! Oh, and just in case there are any here with a Dr. No budget, the built-ins can be found with a discount almost as steep as I found on the counter top unit. Google is your friend, and restaurant suppliers are GOOD!!!

Aug 30, 2014
Caroline1 in Cookware
1

It's Christmas in August!

Just be glad you're not seeing that while you're buying eggs to dye for Easter! That can't be far away! :-(

Aug 30, 2014
Caroline1 in Not About Food
1

What kind of restaurant has the highest profit margins?

I realize this thread is 19 months old, but for profit margin it seems to me you can't beat growing a franchise chain of your own! Remember the grossly misunderstood lawsuit over a scald from a spilled cup of McDonald's coffee? Well, even back then McDonald's annual gross on coffee sales was in the billions in the U.S.market alone, if I recall correctly. While Ray Krock did not build and own the original first-ever McDonald's, he did buy it and turn it into a bona fide "touch down." He ended up with enough pocket change to buy the San Diego Chargers!

I suspect that in today's market even the franchises make a pretty penny. After all, even The Queen of England owns one! Here are some fun and interesting links about McDonald's:

http://tinyurl.com/8f26s82
http://tinyurl.com/qeqe2g8
and finally:
http://tinyurl.com/kf4wwkf
And don't miss the original prices!
http://tinyurl.com/nng5d2o

Aug 30, 2014
Caroline1 in Not About Food