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Are your taste buds ever off?

No tastes that I remember. BUt it was odd that the Kiwi would taste so good and the oranges basically had no taste.

Dec 09, 2014
SteveTimko in General Topics

Are your taste buds ever off?

I was at a fruit stand Saturday, The operator bragged about the quality of the kiwi and the small mandarin oranges. I tasted the kiwi and loved it. I bought lots of that.
I tried orange samples from three different ones and didn't like any of it. But both the operator and other customers raved about it. I bought only a couple.
I tasted the orange this morning and it was fantastic.
So I guess I'm wondering way the kiwi would taste so good and the orange would not.

Dec 08, 2014
SteveTimko in General Topics

Champagne to reduce sulphur dioxide

I'm thinking through all the wines where I detected too much SO2 and I can't think of a single sparkling wine where it was a problem. It's usually in delicate whites or plonkish reds.

Oct 31, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine
1

Best roast duck close to Long Beach?

Anything new for duck?

Oct 13, 2014
SteveTimko in Los Angeles Area

Korean food suggestions in Garden Grove/Long Beach area?

Thanks. I think I may have been to Cham Sut Gol once but could not find it again.

Oct 13, 2014
SteveTimko in Los Angeles Area

'People were afraid of Burgundy when I started,' says broker Becky Wasserman | decanter.com

Wasn't she a secretary to Kermit Lynch or some other importer before she went out on her own?
I think she has many of the best high-end wines but in Burgundy I can afford -- which is almost none now -- Becky Wasserman's name on the label almost assured I wouldn't like it.

Oct 09, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

I got a Le Creuset Dutch oven for $99. What are some good newbie recipes to try?

Thanks for all the tips.
I'm curious. This is the 9.1-quart version. It's 15 inches in diameter. If I wanted to use it on a portable induction heater plate, would it work? Online customer reviews give conflicting advice.

Oct 07, 2014
SteveTimko in Home Cooking

I got a Le Creuset Dutch oven for $99. What are some good newbie recipes to try?

I found a Le Creuset Dutch oven on clearance at Bed, Bath & Beyond for $99. I want to get serious about cooking. So this will be an excuse to start. What are some good recipes for a beginner to try?
So far suggestions on Facebook have been chili and braised short ribs. What bulletproof recipes would you recommend?
The BB&B clerk said they don't carry Le Creuset in stock normally. It is supposed to be scratched, but when I looked at it I couldn't find a scratch.
I'm thinking someone ordered it and didn't pick it up and these disposed of it this way, or someone ordered it (maybe using the 20 percent off coupon), found something wrong with it and returned it and it sat around for a while before they finally dumped it in the clearance table.

Oct 05, 2014
SteveTimko in Home Cooking

Suggestions for wine for an Israeli-style dinner

I think we have an idea in our head what the food will taste like but that abstraction meets reality and it doesn't mesh.
These were uncommon dishes in the United States and probably western Europe. It's just not going to match the tradition.

Oct 02, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Suggestions for wine for an Israeli-style dinner

Wrong. I actually tasted the food. It wouldn't work.
No wines would work. So I might as well serve a nice red that I can enjoy even if it doesn't pair well with the food.

Oct 01, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Suggestions for wine for an Israeli-style dinner

Pinot gris is not an obscure grape. I've had plenty of pinot gris. It would not have worked. I don't need a bottle there to know that.

Oct 01, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Suggestions for wine for an Israeli-style dinner

Thanks again for all the recommendations.
The dinner was last night. The food was great, for the most part. And looking back, I don't think there's wine that would have worked for either of the first two courses. The flavors were too intense and varied. The Israeli salad, for me, was overwhelmed by the mint. Others didn't think that.
The beef short rib and the sausage were both just mildly spiced, so the Novy syrah wasn't a bad match.
The Lascaux was over the hill. The Champagne was just okay. The Hiedler and the Novy were both singing. The Novy got mixed notes on CellarTracker! but I thought it showed great. I didn't open the Unti.
What this meal called for was a nice wheat beer, not wine.

Oct 01, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

SK Noodles Sparks - Vegetarian "Pho"

By the way, this is the place I keep telling you to go to try their udon noodle soup. It's a special, but worth checking out.

Sep 30, 2014
SteveTimko in Southwest
1

SK Noodles Sparks - Vegetarian "Pho"

I'll have to check out the vegetable pho. I've had more than 100 meals there and have not had that.

Sep 29, 2014
SteveTimko in Southwest

Suggestions for wine for an Israeli-style dinner

I heard that and repeated it but it turns out that's no longer true. There are kosher wines made without cooking and there's also some splendid kosher wines. Just none sold here. I have a wine geek friend who is observant on high holy days and he has tried the best kosher wines sold here and said they are terrible.

Sep 27, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Suggestions for wine for an Israeli-style dinner

Thanks to all who replied. The decision has been made. Influencing factors are recommendations in this thread, what wine I was able to find before I got too tired schlepping around my boxes and stuff that needs to be drunk (drank?) now.
One is a non-vintage Champagne. I can't remember by whom. I bought it six years ago at Wine Expo. It's in the drink now category.
No. 2 is a 2009 Lascaux blanc. Probably over the hill. Crossing my fingers. It's a Kermit Lynch import.
No. 3 is a 2006 Hiedler Weissburgunder Maximum. I couldn't find the Boxler pinot blanc. It wasn't in the box I thought it should be in. But I remembered from trying Greek wine with meze that the wine had been done in stainless steel and it really needed something that saw some wood. The Hiedler pinot blanc fits that nicely. Terry Thiese boasts it's the best pinot blanc in the world.
I was trying to find barbera. I have two bottles of Unti Barbera. I could only find one. I called the winery to ask if it's still good and they said coincidentally they tasted through their 2007s a few weeks ago and their still showing find. So No. 4 is a 2007 Unti Barbera. Nos. 5 and 6 are 2004 Novy Syrah Judge Vineyards. The notes are mixed for this on CellarTracker! so I figured it was time to drink them.

Sep 27, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Suggestions for wine for an Israeli-style dinner

No not Kosher. In fact I'm guessing half the people there will be Gentiles.
The only pinot gris I have is a 2001 Boxler. I'm kind of protecting my Boxlers. . . but maybe this is the time to drink it. Even if most the people there couldn't tell a difference between a Boxler and Woodbridge.

Sep 24, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Suggestions for wine for an Israeli-style dinner

I'm going to a pop-up dinner serving what is described as Israeli-style food next week. After I posted this thread a few years ago, I don't think I can find a good wine to match the appetizers. So I'll stick with sparkling wine there.
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/808365
Below is the menu. This is as much as I know about it. Generally, what are some wines that can go with the main course? Israeli wines are out of the question. The Israeli wine sold here are terrible.
What are some other wines that will match with the foods?
The menu:
The Israeli Experience (9 Dishes served family style in 4 courses):
- Falafel, tahini, zhug, pickled shallot, herbs
- Hummus mesabecha, sumac oil
- Israeli salad, local cucumbers, heirloom tomato, Dough's garden jalapeno and radish, mint, sumac, scallion
- Grilled Pita

- Chicken wings, baharat spice, preserved lemon aioli
- Fried cauliflower, pomegranate tehini, mint
- Roasted local carrots, babaganoush, olives, local queso fresco and pea shoots, harissa butter

- Shawarma spiced beef, muhamarra, crispy marble potato, nasturtium
- Merguez sausage, lebneh, pickled dates, couscous

- Fresh doughnuts, cinnamon apricot jam, lemon curd, eggplant jam

Sep 24, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Best tasting broth sold in a store?

Okay, I tried the Rachel Ray today and I'd have to rank it as the best tasting so far. The funny thing is that the Kitchen Basics advertises it is made with McCormick spices but the thing that makes Rachel Ray's taste better to me isn't the chicken flavor, which is mild, but the spices.
It is still not great. I'm going to try others.

Sep 14, 2014
SteveTimko in General Topics

Looking for wine to lay down 20-25 years

Rose is a not a 20-year wine.
I would look at German spatlese rieslings from reliable producers. Spatlese is off-dry, but not quite a dessert wine. I'm drinking Bollig-Lehnert spatleses from 1989 that are fabulous. I bought them as a library releases from K&L Wines for $18 a bottle.
If you live in the San Francisco area, K&L Wines can make some great suggestions for riesling and other wines. So can Paul Marcus Wines in Oakland and North Berkeley Imports. North Berkeley is an importer of Pibarnon, by the way.
I would rethink not including some Ridge zinfandels. I'm drinking them from the early 1980s and they're holding up nicely.

Sep 10, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Looking for wine to lay down 20-25 years

When I look at Wine Searcher Pibarnon is $40 or the low $40s, although no 2012s yet.
My 1993 Pibarnon is still young.

Sep 10, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Looking for wine to lay down 20-25 years

I pretty much agree with JBL but I'd add another option: Bandol.
The 2011 Domaine de la Bastide Blanche Bandol, a basic bottling, can go two decades.

http://www.klwines.com/detail.asp?sku...

2012 was a problem vintage in many places but Bandol is on the Mediterranean and is generally less affected by climate than other places.
So look for basic Tempier (the single vineyards are out of your price range) or Bastide Blanche, Terrebrune, Pradeux or Pibarnon.
Another option is to call the Kermit Lynch store in Berkeley. They're generally pretty straight up with me.

Sep 09, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Korean food suggestions in Garden Grove/Long Beach area?

Any feelings about Shinjuku Izakaya or BBQ Night?

Sep 02, 2014
SteveTimko in Los Angeles Area

Best tasting broth sold in a store?

Thanks all for your comments.
My local store carries Kitchen Basics and I bought a carton. It's the best I've tried, but still has too many odd flavors. I will look for others to try.

Aug 26, 2014
SteveTimko in General Topics

Help me choose my wedding wines!

For that price range, I've had good luck with Bex Riesling.
Mark West pinot noir actually tastes like pinot noir. buy a bottle and see if you like it. I saw it on sale at Walgreens for $9.

Aug 26, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Best tasting broth sold in a store?

What's the best tasting broth you can buy in a store, preferably chicken broth? Is it purposely left kind of bland so as to not interfere with other tastes?
I've tried Swanson, Campbell's and Progresso and they're all about the same. Plus they have that god awful aftertaste.

Aug 17, 2014
SteveTimko in General Topics

Reno Chowdown: Delicious foie gras at Fourth Street Bistro

Foie gras turned up as an issue in a review of Fourth Street Bistro on another web site. Plus foie gras protesters held a demonstration in Reno seeking a ban here like they had in California. A lot of people have never tasted foie gras. So I decided this would be an issue for the Greater Reno Grub and Gripe Group to explore at Fourth Street Bistro. We did and the unanimous verdict: Foie gras is frickin’ delicious.
All four of us who went have had foie gras before. The first two times I tried foie gras I was indifferent. In the hands of an unskilled chef it can be tough with odd liver flavor. Then I had it in Los Angeles at a wine tasting where it was served on top of a steak. Wow. My opinion about foie gras, which is made from goose or duck liver, turned around completely.
I figured if anyone could make good foie gras in Reno it would be the 4th Street Bistro. Foie gras was our first entrée. It was pan seared and we got two pieces served on the center of the plate. It was framed by sprouts and had a strawberry reduction on the plate behind it and slices of bread on both sides.
The taste and texture was exquisite. Like buttah. With a perfectly crispy skin. Like that fat on a good steak that you are glad you ate and didn’t throw away. There was also a mild liver flavor. Quite delicious but also quite rich. RevAndy talked about how he once built a whole dinner around several kinds of foie gras and by the time they got to the entrée they were pretty much foie grased out. I used the bread to soak up the strawberry reduction.
I brought a 1995 Foreau Vouvray moelleux to go with the foie gras. This is a sweet wine with lots of acid. Fourth Street Bistro provides a small glass of Moscato. This is a sweet, slightly sparkling Italian wine. The consensus of the group is that if you were just eating the foie gras, the Vouvray paired best, but if you mixed the foie gras with the strawberry, the Moscato worked best. Vouvray moelleux is not common. Craft Wine and Beer has a 2005 for $30. Corkage at 4th Street Bistro is $20.

Aug 15, 2014
SteveTimko in Southwest

Great Pinot Noir under $20 -- Is there such a thing?

I heard they had some bret problems when they went back to the Santa Cruz fruit from Carneros. Do you know anything about that?

Aug 12, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Korean food suggestions in Garden Grove/Long Beach area?

So I found Mo Ran Gak Restaurant in Garden Grove and I'm perfectly content eating there. But I'm wondering if there's a newer or more interesting Korean restaurant to try?
I love barbecue, bulgogi, hot pots, jap chae, and especially the banchan.
Any suggestions for some other place to try? It will probably just be me, so something that requires groups doesn't work.

Aug 11, 2014
SteveTimko in Los Angeles Area

Sulfite free wines

So then what's your policy on bottles with secondary fermentation? I bought two bottles of the 2004 Domaine Barmes-Buecher Riesling Steingrubler. The first was quite good. The second had secondary fermentation. I bought several others out of the Dressner line that had secondary fermentation. I'm guessing it is average of about one out of 15 for the wines I buy without added sulfur. That makes me leery.
Should customers be able to bring back wine with secondary fermentation for another bottle? Or should it be, like Joe Dressner said, that the customer eat the price of the wine as a way of supporting this kind of winemaking?

Aug 10, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine