SteveTimko's Profile

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White Pinot Noir

What vineyards do they own? It says on their website they supervise and buy pinot grapes from more than 20 vineyards.
http://siduri.com/vineyards/
I don't recognize every vineyard on the list, but I know they don't own at least a dozen of them.

Jul 22, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

White Pinot Noir

I'm saying it because it doesn't taste like it's made to age. The screwcap puts an exclamation point on that. I haven't purchased Siduri or Novy in six years. It was the first wine of theirs that had screwcaps. Even the entry level Willamette pino had cork.
By the way, I wouldn't call Novy a second label. the wines generally are as seriously made as the Siduri.

Jul 20, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

White Pinot Noir

the Novy wine seems more a like a novelty. It comes in a screwcap. Not that I'm against screwcaps.

Jul 18, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

White Pinot Noir

Novy, another label for Suduri, has put out a white pinot noir from willamette valley.It's okay, nothing great.
Domaine Serene puts out Coeur Blanc, a white wine made from pinot noir. I haven't had it. It's $95 a bottle. I can buy some awfully good white Burgundy for $95 a bottle.

http://www.domaineserene.com/?method=...

Jul 18, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Gallo family fortune close to $10bn

Bronco Wine Co. (2 buck chuck) looks rather tame by comparison.

http://bit.ly/1mfhi3T

Jul 15, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Gallo family fortune close to $10bn

Yep. Make sure it's set on earth view.

http://bit.ly/1rbYlqu

You want terroir? We gots lots of terroir. By the boatload.

Jul 14, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine
1

Gallo family fortune close to $10bn

I still remember that factoid, and I don't know if it's still true, that the massive Gallo fermenter in Modesto has the capacity equal to the capacity in something like 97 percent of the other wineries in the states. I drove past the Gallo campus in Modesto and it's an unmarked industrial building.

Jul 14, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine
1

Ruinart cellar chief opposes disgorgement dates on non-vintage Champagne

Foreau released a non-vintage sparkler and called it 2004/2005. It makes a lot of sense. I guess it caused some consternation in the Loire but it will help customers.
How many wine stores run glowing reviews of non-vintage sparkling wines that were written a dozen years earlier?

Jul 10, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Brother's Barbecue Reno

I made it to Brothers Barbecue last week. I think it’s a good addition to the restaurant scene in the area. Overall I liked my meal, although I wouldn’t rate it the best barbecue place in the area.
I ordered the combo plate. I got ribs, beef brisket and for $2.50 ordered the hot link.
Like Janet I liked the ribs. I asked for the sauce on the side and they still had a little sauce on them, which was fine for me. They were tender and had nice pork flavor as well as a little bit of zing. The big question on the ribs is whether RevAndy would approve. I got three ribs. The first was fall-off-the-bone, what RevAndy calls meat jello. So at that point I pretty much wrote them off for him. I didn’t really pay attention to the second rib, other than to notice I liked it. I bit into the third rib and it was firm and flavorful. This would be a rib that RevAndy would like. So which is their true style? I didn’t pay attention to the second rib to get the deciding vote. But I don’t mind going back for more ribs to find out.
As Janet noted, they said they are Texas style. So that means beef brisket to me. And this is where I felt they had their biggest failure. The brisket I got was a nice piece of beef, tender from being slow cooked. But it tasted like expertly cooked pot roast. The dominate flavor, about the only flavor, was the fat from the beef. No smoke. No spices. I’m not even sure it had salt and pepper. I remember that Arthur Bryant’s brisket wasn’t exceptionally spiced. It was kind of a vehicle to deliver the awesome Arthur Bryant sauce. But it still had some flavorings beyond fat.
And as Janet said, the sauces were nothing to get excited about. The non-spicy one tasted too ketchupy.
I liked the hot links and recommend them. Good zing and some other nice flavors.
I don’t like cole slaw but I liked their regular cole slaw and ate it all. I don’t know if an endorsement from someone who doesn’t like cole slaw is a good thing. Like Janet said, I liked that they went easy on the mayo.
The beans were not bad. They were firm, which I like, and not mushy. But they were also a little bland. I think I would try something else next time.
The staff was friendly.
The location is Roberts Street at Wells Avenue.
Brothers Barbecue
463 Roberts St
Reno, NV 89502
(775) 384-3547
http://www.brothersbarbecue.net/index...

Jul 05, 2014
SteveTimko in Southwest

Sonoma wine

Okay, someone pointed out that Sandlands sold out within hours of release. So that's not an option.
However, Sonoma Market or Wine Shack in Sonoma apparently has the others I mentioned.

Jul 02, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Sonoma wine

Some suggestions:
The Ridge Vineyards tasting room in Lytton Springs will sell older vintages of wines from its ATP (advanced tasting program). I've picked up some gems there for $25 to $35 a bottle.
http://www.ridgewine.com/Visit/Lytton...

there are some other wines that have some hipsterish credibility but aren't widely distributed. I'd suggest looking for Cowan Cellars, Bedrock Vineyards, Holdredge wines and Sandlands. the last is an interesting project of a winemaker making wines from different parts of California using only vines planted in sand. I will see where these are sold in Sonoma.

Jul 02, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

What champagne works for cocktails?

I have no experience in cocktails from sparkling wine but I have made some tasty kirs and the key there is the Creme de Cassis and not the dry white wine. As long as it was balanced and dry, you can use box wine to make a good kir if you have good Creme de Cassis. I suspect that may be true with cocktails from sparkling wine.

Jun 26, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

South Creek Pizza Co. Reno

I also enjoyed the pizzas at South Creek. It was my second time there and this time I got to try a variety of pizzas so I liked it more than my first visit. I tended to like the ones Andy liked as well. They use good quality ingrediants and the crusts are quite nice. Thin, crispy and they char it.
Andy liked The Nomad but I didn't. It and some of the other pizzas seemed too Californicated. That's also why I don't like the pizzas at Eclipse and Black Rock.
I thought the green beans were great, but I'm sucker for fresh green beans.
Service is good.
South Creek is an excellent option for pizzas. I still think LaVecchia makes the best pizza in the area and Boulevard makes the best traditional American pizza.

Jun 26, 2014
SteveTimko in Southwest

Wanted: Light Red Wine

What is the name and city of the restaurant?

Jun 25, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine
1

Best inexpensive wine?

I've got a bottle of 1973 Sutter Home Amador zin I need to drink pretty soon. Think it would go well with pizza? I could drink it this Saturday.

Jun 18, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Rioja winemaker swaps oak for chestnut

The Italian-born winemakers who started what is now Sobon Estate used huge redwood barrels to make their wine. It was the kind of place where they sold wine by the gallon and expected you to bring your own jug. But old timers I've talked to said it was actually pretty good wine.
I guess the first couple of vintages were kind of weird, but for the next 30 or 40 years the barrels were neutral in terms of flavor imparted on the wines.

Jun 16, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Random Reno comments....a tale of two Thai, falafel, and question on new places...

I can bring wine

Jun 09, 2014
SteveTimko in Southwest
1

Random Reno comments....a tale of two Thai, falafel, and question on new places...

I went to Bangkok Cuisine a couple of months ago and loved it. You may have had a bad night.

That is surprising to hear about the falafel. I've tried Joe Diner's every a couple of years for other food and have never been impressed. I will try it again.

Chuy's is owned by the guy who used to have the Mexican place on Keystone at fifth street. It was in the mall that was torn down.

Have you been to Los Cuatro Vientos on Casazza Street yet?

Jun 08, 2014
SteveTimko in Southwest

Wine to go with an omelet?

Yes, I have visited several times. I bought this viognier during my last visit. I believe it was 2008. They opened a 1999 viognier to show how their wine ages.

May 27, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine
1

Reno: User's guide for gringos for Los Cuatro Vientos

How cool of a place is Los Cuatro Vientos (The Four Winds) as a place to eat?
How about quesadillas made with mushrooms or squash blossoms? The tortillas are freshly made, adding to the overall awesomeness. There’s also corn fungus (huitlacoche) quesadillas, but after trying one they’re pretty rich for one person to eat. They’re perhaps better split between two or more people. Some on the Internet call huitlacoche Mexican truffles.
Another gem of a food item to try: Molcajete. This is a sizzling hot pot with a mildly spicy tomato base and beef steak, chicken, chorizo sausage, shrimp, cactus, white cheese called queso fresco, one big onion and one big pepper.
Check out my YouTube video for the molcajete I had:
http://youtu.be/xiUohpeuLKA
Los 4 Vientos has an extensive menu with freshly made food. Much of it comes from scratch and not out of a can. This is a great place for people who like quality food that isn’t expensive. I saw lines backed up out the door for Chipotle and wondered why we can’t get the same level of enthusiasm for Los Cuatro Vientos, which has a greater variety of better food for less money. Some of it is people being intimidated by the language barrier. So I’m taking it upon myself to help people along, including giving translations for fillings available for tacos, burritos and quesadillas (see the list at the bottom). Granted, pig esophagus isn’t going to be what everyone wants in their burritos, but some of the dishes are both delicious and different. And safe to eat for picky eaters. And you really need to try them in a quesadilla. The corn tortillas are freshly made (or at least taste that way) and the meal is just that much better with one.
Also, ask what kind of drinks they have behind the counter. I’m not a horchata (rice milk) fan, but other drinks are tasty. Jamaica is a hibiscus ice tea and it’s one of my favorites. Agua fresca de pepino is a drink made from cucumber, lime and sugar and is perfect on a hot summer day.
They have a lot of the conventional Mexican food. If you go to the right end of the menu hanging over the counter, there are lists for less conventional Mexican food.
They usually have four kinds of salsa in their salsa bar, including pico de gallo. I love the basic red salsa. It has a nice smokiness.
Los Cuatro Vientos also serves breakfast and has deals on breakfast and lunch specials.

Asada: Grilled beef
Barbacoa: Slow-cooked meats. Supposedly the source for the word barbecue.
Buche: Pig esophagus
Cabeza: Meat from all parts of the head
Camaron: Shrimp.
Carnitas: Braised or roasted pork
Chicarron: Pig skin
Chorizo: Mexican sausage
Flor de calabaza: Squash flowers
Hongos: Mushrooms
Huitlacoche: Corn fungus
Pescado: Fish
Picadillo: Ground beef, tomatoes and other vegetables like onions.
Pollo: Chicken
Rajas: Shredded chili peppers
Saudero: From the rear part of flank steak. Often fried.
Surtido: Assorted meats
Tripas: Tripe

May 24, 2014
SteveTimko in Southwest
2

reno rehearsal dinner

Santa Fe Hotel would let you have part of a room. A friend describe the Santa Fe as having an American Legion Hall look about it. Louie's has a room they might let you have, too. I dunno.
La Fuente has a room, but I'm not sure if Mexican is good for a rehearsal dinner. I like the food there.
The Nugget Rotisserie has a room to the right just when you walk through the entrance. Not sure it can hold 25, though. they were letting people use the now closed Basque restaurant at the Nugget, but I'm not sure it's cheap. Check it out.

May 22, 2014
SteveTimko in Southwest

Wine to go with an omelet?

Men could shave, but women could not.

May 20, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine
2

Wine to go with an omelet?

Thanks all for the advice. Nothing sounded like an especially good pairing. The dinner was the theme of 49er miner food to go with a lecture on the Gold Rush. I decided to go with Sierra Foothills wines, a 2007 Cedarville Viognier which was great and a 2007 Holly Hill mourvedre, which was nice. They worked well enough.

May 19, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Wine to go with an omelet?

I'm going to a dinner where they will serve steak and a hangtown fry, which is an omelet with bacon and oysters.
I need suggestions for a wine to go with the hangtown fry. by the way, I need to deplete my existing wines. I have only one rose, a 2008 Tempier, that I'm saving for something special. So no rose suggestions.

May 14, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Venison Stock

I may find myself in the same situation as billieboy. The Minestrone soup sounds good. Any other suggestions for venison stock?
I got some good tips for making the stock here.
http://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/h...
Any other pitfalls to avoid? What about cooking the bones overnight? Is that too long?
Venison can sometimes be gamey. Is that a problem with stock too?

May 14, 2014
SteveTimko in Home Cooking

Alsace: the new generation

Actually, I screwed up in telling the story originally. It was Laurence who was the intern.

May 13, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine
1

Alsace: the new generation

Sadly, Laurence Faller passed away.

http://www.dna.fr/actualite/2014/05/1...

May 13, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Sulfite free wines

I had a discussion once with a scientist about items like arsenic, silver, lead and other elements in our local water supply. He said if you get sensitive enough equipment, you can find them in all natural water supplies. It's that at some point you're measuring them in amounts that are close to negligible. I'm guessing that's what applies to sulfur as well.

Apr 20, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Sulfite free wines

Alcohol content can vary greatly between the time the label is approved and it's bottled. I'm wondering if sulfur can change, too? You'd have to sample each barrel at the time of bottling.

Apr 19, 2014
SteveTimko in Wine

Reno chowdown: Cooking class and dinner at Lanna Thai

The Greater Reno Grub and Gripe Group gathered at Lanna Thai Café and Culinary School for an evening of a cooking lesson and eating. Everyone loved the experience and as the evening ended there was talk of planning another.
Lanna Thai operates as a restaurant six days a week. On Monday nights they are closed, but if you have a big enough group Chef Pim will hold a cooking class. You eat what you cook and as GRGAGG member Robin observed, thanks to Chef Pim we were pretty good cooks.
Our menu was Thai chicken coconut soup (tom kha gai), a spicy clams appetizer and a pumpkin shrimp curry. We were escorted from the front to the kitchen where they had cutting boards for us with the recipes for all three dishes printed out.
Chef Pim started us with the pumpkin shrimp curry. We all had knives and Chef Pim had us cut the rind off what I believe were kobocha, an Asian pumpkin. She was speedy with her knife. I brought up the rear but I got enough cut off. We also sliced the pumpkin and then moved on to other vegetables. Finally we had everything prepared and it was time to cook. We started by heating oil in a pot and then adding red curry paste. The trick was to let the paste and oil cook together and then stir until the oil started coming out of the top of the mix. Then we added coconut milk. Chef Pim talked about the different types of curry and their uses (she feels yellow curry is used for vegetarian dishes, for example). We added items that needed to cook the longest first, like roots, and moved through the vegetables. Chef Pim brought out shrimp that had marinated overnight lime juice and something else, I can't remember what. Soon it was time for the final touches. We had put in fish sauce and sugar and Chef Pim would taste our dishes and tell us what to add. It was usually more fish sauce or sugar. After about 25 minutes of cooking we were done. And the pumpkin shrimp curry tasted fabulous.
Next we did the spicy clams. I only watched on this one as others stir fried the clams in woks, adding in sauces and basil leaves, among other ingredients. The clams were also excellent.
Chef Pim had us go eat the curry and clams while she cleaned up the kitchen. There was plenty of food and plenty of leftovers to take home. And like any GRGAGG event, there was also plenty of good wine flowing.
Everyone was stuffed, but it was time to go back into the kitchen and make the chicken coconut soup, a favorite of mine. We started with coconut milk in the pot and added the other ingredients. I had my "Ah Hah!" moment when she tried my soup, which tasted good already, and suggested adding more sugar and fish sauce. About a teaspoon of each gave the soup that extra oomph and made it extra delicious.
Of course, whether I can make it this good at home is another question. I won't have Chef Pim right there to check it and tell me what it needs.
I've eaten at Lanna Thai once before and enjoyed the meal, so it's a great place for either a cooking lesson or just a meal.

Lanna Thai Cafe and Culinary School
800 W 2nd St
Reno, NV 89503
(775) 284-1080
www.lannathaicafe.com

Apr 06, 2014
SteveTimko in Southwest