Clambelly's Profile

Title Last Reply

Balsamic Vinaigrette

too much oil and sugar for that amount of vinegar. Othewise, it's fine. A little finely chopped mint would be nice as well.

May 15, 2013
Clambelly in Recipes

Bull-Market Burger

Daniel...stick to what you know---overpriced, pretentious French cuisine that you can charge pretentious Americans way too much money for, and leave the burgers to us. For one thing, the size of this burger makes it instantly unappealing. Secondly, truffles and fois gras are wasted in all this deep beef flavor, and frisee has NO place on a burger. I've been to your restaurant and to your Cafe Boulud. Both are ridiculously overpriced for not very much. I'd never question your knowledge of gastronomy--only your choices.

May 29, 2012
Clambelly in Recipes

Whole Belly (Ipswich) Fried Clams

Well, I don't mean to be obnoxious. I know I've been beating this topic to death over the past couple of years, but I felt the need to update--after all, it's been nearly 3 years since the last post on the subject of WBCs. I want to be fair, so I'm going to admit that my addiction has taken me back to Bigelow's a couple of time, and I'm happy to report that it was better both times. The french fries are decidedly better, although I usually don't bother with them (um, I can get good fries almost anywhere). The clams, though, were better, though still not in the league with Essex, Farnham's or Woodman's, but then, we Long Island beggars can't be choosy can we?

May 16, 2012
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Chili con Carne

Not bad...but try this: Add a few tablespoons of fine masa harina and sprinkle over the top as it's all simmering. It will nicely thicken everything without making it scummy. Also, a Tbs. of unsweetened cocoa powder is a secret ingredient for any dish with this many tomatoes (including Italian marinara sauce, or any pasta sauce for that matter, as long as the sauce is tomato-based), and don't forget a sprig or two of cilantro.

Mar 23, 2011
Clambelly in Recipes

Basic Italian Meatballs

Where did you get this whacked out meatball recipe? This is about as Italian as Gumbo. And the flour makes it sound like it's probably gonna seem like gumbo. Yuch. This must be a south of the Mason-Dixon line "Italian" recipe. Puhleeze.

Mar 23, 2011
Clambelly in Recipes

best pizza on long island???

Absolutely the worst pizza in a city (yes, Glen Cove is a city--the only other one, in fact, on Long Island, other than Long Beach. Why? Who knows?) that is already bereft of decent pizza. There simply is no decent pizza in Glen Cove but the worst by far is Forest. They've built a new location that looks like a mobster's house in Brooklyn, replete with balustrades. Look, the guys who own it are all family and they're nice and very competent at running the business. The only problem is that they don't rise the dough enough and worse--they don't BAKE it enough. Every pie they turn out (and I've gone in there several times over decades) comes out raw. I don't understand their penchant for under-baking their pizza, but they do it consistently. Good guys, bad, but REALLY bad, pizza. Raw and flavorless. Don't bother.

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Forest Ave Pizza
81B Forest Ave, Glen Cove, NY 11542

Jul 12, 2010
Clambelly in New York State (exc. NYC)

Hyde Park / Rhinebeck

It's a gross generalization, but resort food usually isn't worth writing home about. It's usually copious, but "big" ain't necessarily "good." I know a million of you hounds are going to post now and tell us about resorts whose food is fabulous, and I AGREE that it's often true. It's just that it's too often NOT true.

Apr 09, 2010
Clambelly in New York State (exc. NYC)

Keens Review + Photos

Well, I guess I stand corrected. After reading your passionate take on steak and steak houses, I feel I've been educated. It's not my favorite cuisine, and I have probably spoken out of school. I honestly never considered your well-enumerated points, especially the beef tallow deep frying, which I should have remembered. The steak I can get, but I'd be buying it from equally expensive places, which would pretty much negate the expected benefit of avoiding the extra cost of the restaurant. I do have a pro stove, so that wasn't a good point either because most people don't. So far, most of my points have been defeated, but I'm grateful to you nonetheless, the slight sarcasm notwithstanding. If you walk the walk, you have every right to talk the talk.

But I have to take umbrage at one thing: I'd already decided to try the $26 burger at Minetta Tavern, made from dry-aged, prime brisket, rib eye and prime rib, and now you've rekindled my appetite for a really fine steak at either Pete's or Keen's. My appetite now whet, perhaps my long absence from either place has elicited my misguided, posting. But, I'm going to have to send you the bill. I'll keep it down to 2 Scotches though.

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Minetta Tavern
113 MacDougal St, New York, NY 10012

Mar 29, 2010
Clambelly in Manhattan

New to Glen Cove and looking for food!

Well, gang, just as I feared, it has happened. When this local sushi opened it was amazing. I've touted it to everyone I knew who was a fan of Kotobuki, Nisen and other respected Japanese restaurants. When we first visited Kiraku, we were so pleased that my initial instinct was that I very much hoped that the quality would remain just as it was that night. Somehow I knew it wouldn't, and, sadly, it has not. The fish is sliced narrower, and "sushi for 2" now contains only 2 pieces of tuna. Another piece of "white tuna" (actually a fish called escolar) has been replaced by a very tough (not my favorite) piece of I don't know what. I thought giant clam, but it's very white and very striated. Incredibly tough and chewy. Might be prized, but I didn't like it. The entire experience has been diminished, in my view. I'm going to have to give Kotobuki (in the small shopping center beneath the Roslyn Viaduct) another try and brave the ridiculous Friday night crowds.

By the way....big kudos to Osaka at Springfield Blvd. and Union Tpke. in Flushing, Queens. They too are relatively young. I hope their quality does not slip over time. For now, they're one of my big favorites. Tough parking, absolutely lovely Japanese family run. Great rolls, very reasonable.

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Kiraku Japanese Restaurant
127 Glen Head Rd, Glen Head, NY 11545

Feb 21, 2010
Clambelly in New York State (exc. NYC)

BEST PIZZA ON LONG ISLAND

::Update:: on Abeetza. Something I've noticed of late. Eat it THERE. The takeout version of their pizza is weaker. We ordered fresh garlic and mushroom on a pie to go, and when we opened the pie it was clear they had sliced up maybe 2 cloves of garlic at most and you could barely detect any mushrooms. Joanne's is still better, at least for all their selections. I love the Chicken Dijon pizza. Want a good sausage slice--head up to Arthur Avenue in the Bronx.

Feb 20, 2010
Clambelly in New York State (exc. NYC)

Keens Review + Photos

The place is great, as is Luger, so this review is not meant to contest either's quality. I'd rather not have to go to Brooklyn for a cool steakhouse experience, since I don't live in the City. I'm one of those Long Islanders who does not eschew New York City, but still embraces it, so it's not exactly a hardship to travel for a nice restaurant. Our friends are the same--all former denizens of the city who moved out to start families.

Steak. We must be talking about a dining experience when we discuss steak, because everything served at a steakhouse, even one of note, is obtainable and fairly simple to achieve at home. I can get a beautifully aged prime steak of any cut I desire, a great wine, the same Scotch, a Caesar salad or, I mean come on--a wedge of iceberg lettuce costs HOW much at your restaurant? This will sound pompous, but, my own creamed spinach blows away any I've had at any steakhouse anyway, and even if yours doesn't you're not going to suffer much without creamed spinach when you, too, toss your great steak on the grill or pan cook it to perfect doneness. And, last I checked, a potato is, well, a potato.

So we're talking better establishment here, and we're talking best steak between the two places. Are we talking price? Puhleeze--a good steakhouse is a man-made ripoff of the most grandiose proportions no matter how you slice it, you should pardon the pun. Ahhh....so, therein lies the rub (again I beg your forbearance). To slice or not to slice? For my money, Keen's wins. It wins because it doesn't allow a silly affectation of a waiter making more of this slab of beast than it truly is. It wins because it doesn't treat me like a child and cut my meat for me. I'm not someone given to the charms of another human handling my food before my eyes, whether it's a waiter de-shelling a lobster or a knife-tossing Benihana cook. Much as I like the company of the friendly sushi chef, I don't usually sit at the sushi bar. I prefer a table, where I can't see the chef's hands molding the thing with his bare hands that I'm going to plunk into my mouth in short order.

Keen's also gives me my very own steak on my very own plate. Another reason I prefer that is that I always seem to be the guy who gets the 3 pieces with the most gristle and fat, when ordering porterhouse for two, replete with slicing service. I don't complain when I see the guy placing those 3 gristly slices on my plate, but I again have a lousy porterhouse experience. Well, not lousy. We ARE talking about Peter Luger, after all. But, it's not, shall we say, what it could be.

So, there, I've said it. Keen's wins on every level it can, other than quality. It wins in terms of decor and location, and the fact that either after or before my meal, I can see a play, a film, a concert as well, and make it an entire evening's doings. If I have to go to Brooklyn for a good steak, that's ALL I'm doing, and certain to go home afterward.

Keen's steaks are smaller and maybe not completely, absolutely, totally as good. But pound for pound, I'll take Keen's.

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Keens Steak House
72 West 36th St., New York, NY 10018

Feb 19, 2010
Clambelly in Manhattan

BEST PIZZA ON LONG ISLAND

Abeetza, in Greenvale, is pretty good (and very expensive). It's nowhere near Umberto's of NHP, however, and the guys who work there are major a-holes. The guy in his later 20s anyway (dark hair). He says nothing to you--not hello, not goodbye, just says the price and pretty much tosses the change at you. I guess he's angry at the world or he's too cool to speak to the great unwashed--his customer base. The guy who owns it is slightly better. All in all, the place is not very warm. However, it IS overpriced as hell, so I guess the rent there must be absurd. You'd think with all the Italians in Glen Cove there would be a decent pizza place, but there really isn't one.

Feb 11, 2010
Clambelly in New York State (exc. NYC)

BEST PIZZA ON LONG ISLAND

Ahhh....John's of Bleeker St. (which I think blows Grimaldi's away), but yes....we have to learn to like Long Island pizza, I guess. There's no other way to survive!!!! hahaha. Not that it's bad, because it's not, and as long as we have an Umberto's (NHP) can't go wrong. Still, it's not the Bronx, where you can "fall" into almost any pizza parlor and score at least a decent, and sometimes an excellent, slice. On the Island, it requires a bit of research, but there's decent pizza to be had.

Feb 09, 2010
Clambelly in New York State (exc. NYC)

BEST PIZZA ON LONG ISLAND

Well, yeah, that's a given. Umberto's, we know, is going to sit high on any Long Island list, but thanks for mentioning it again anyway.

Feb 09, 2010
Clambelly in New York State (exc. NYC)

New to Glen Cove and looking for food!

Phil, I know this is mid-November, but on the chance that you check the boards from time to time I thought I'd ask about Iron Horse's burger. Decent? Or should I keep drivin'? I'd love to find a few good burger places on the north shore, but I'm not familiar with any other than the Buckram Stables in Locust Valley, which is too cutesy, clubby and stuffy for me--the Locust Valley lockjaw syndrome, dewnt yew knew. Yoiks, polo, anyone? Oh, but i should give props where due. Good burger, which they call the, ready?....Stabilizer. Waffle fries-regular or sweet, and other Caucasian stuff.

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Iron Horse
20 Washington Ave, Westwood, NJ 07675

Buckram Stables Cafe
31 Forest Ave # 33, Locust Valley, NY 11560

Nov 15, 2009
Clambelly in New York State (exc. NYC)

Five Guys Burgers & Other Chain Digression [split from Tri-State]

Note to self....do not eat dinner in Curacao. Thanks, Michele! LOL

Nov 14, 2009
Clambelly in Chains

Five Guys Burgers & Other Chain Digression [split from Tri-State]

It's an amazing phenomenon. How in the world those chains (and also add to them any pizza chains) do business in the metro area of NY just floors me. With all the ethnic restaurants and especially one-of-a-kind restaurants, ESPECIALLY PIZZA, in NY, NJ and CT, I'm just flabbergasted that people go to these places. I have one question....WHY???? It can't be price. They're not cheaper than other places. It blows my mind to see people lining up for Red Lobster here in this part of the country. Okay, okay, I get why someone in Lincoln, Nebraska goes to a Red Lobster, but in NY? I'll never understand, just as I'll never understand how Domino's, Pizza Hut or Papa John's stay in business in NY. You can get a better slice by accident here. Just fall into any pizza parlor on any street in the tristate area and you're likely to do far better than any Domino's or Pizza Hut. Amazing. Just amazing.

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Pizza Hut Restaurants
2002 State Route 27, Edison, NJ 08817

Nov 13, 2009
Clambelly in Chains

Bobby's Burger Palace (Flay's new chain) opens

I'm witcha on Mr. Flay. Let's just say, he's no Eric Ripert.

Nov 13, 2009
Clambelly in New York State (exc. NYC)

Lost in Woodbury

Well, I didn't mean to intimate that you don't see lamb at all in Greek places, but I find that even good Greek places tend to be pork heavy and lamb light. But then, there's that really exotic ubiquitous dish that seems to be served alongside just about everything in a Greek restaurant--rice with peas. I mean, how interesting!! White rice, with some peas rolled in. Woo hoo. I always laugh when we go to a Greek restaurant and they plop down that rice and peas. I mean, hey, I eat it...don't get me wrong. I just think it's kind of funny, and I'm not sure why. One thing I'll say, though, Greek/Turkish food, well ALL Mediterranean food for that matter, is probably the healthiest and freshest restaurant food going.

Nov 13, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Lost in Woodbury

Oh, by the way, Ben's is almost tolerable. It's not 2nd Ave. Deli and it's most CERTAINLY not Katz's, but then Woodbury is not the Lower East Side of Manhattan, so if you're near the north shore and don't feel like a trip, you'll have to swallow hard and settle for Ben's. It's the best of the worst. If you're a chopped liver aficionado don't bother, however. Ben's makes probably the worst chopped liver I've ever ingested. In fact, so bad I almost didn't ingest it. Couldn't get past the 1st bite with any confidence at all, but I did take a 2nd just to make sure I didn't get it wrong. Really lousy. Look, I'm a big believer in immigration. Hell, most of us are children or at least grandchildren of immigrants. it's what America is all about. You know...Emma Lazarus's poem quoted on the Statue of Liberty--`Give us your poor, your tired, your huddled masses yearning to be free...' I'm all for our Mexican brethren working anywhere they wish, including all the best restaurants in Manhattan, but amigos....there's an art to chopped liver and I'm afraid you hombres didn't get that one right. So, I sentence you to visit Katz's on Houston St. and ask for a quick primer tutorial before you even attempt to make chopped liver for Ben's again. I mean, WOW, is it bad. Oh, the other thing that's bad at Ben's is the Russian dressing. I think they use it to wring the mop out in. That is just not Russian dressing. You know....come to think of it, Ben's sucks. Maybe I've just had too much good Jewish deli in my time, but Ben's really pales in comparison to almost anything decent. I guess I was being kind earlier in this paragraph. If you're having a Jones for hot pastrami, well, you gotta go. I mean, I do on occasion, but really, it's a poor excuse for a Jewish deli. The pickles are good LOL. Now, Gaby's bagels is right there on Jericho Tpke. Kind of expensive for what it is, but hey, what isn't these days? The burger at On Parade diner (the other side of Jericho Tpke) is lousy, but in most other respects it's a decent diner.

Nov 13, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Worst PIzza on Long Island

Hey, got a great idea...since most NY pizza is at least palatable, wouldn't it be fun to dredge up a list of the WORST pizza on Long Island? Really, I'm not a negative person, but I do admit to being a bit of a cynic. In that spirit, I think it's worth "warning" fellow foodies about pizzerias that would be wise to avoid, and I'd like to start the list with what is certainly the most pretentious LOOKING place for pizza, and one of the worst actual pizzas in terms of flavor and texture--Forest Pizzeria in Glen Cove. They used to be in the King Kullen shopping center and moved out to build what looks like the pizza emporium of the 7 hills of Rome itself, complete with balastraded railings and marble floors. It's like the Vatican of pizza. Unfortunately, the pizza, while it looks good, has almost zero flavor. Worst in Glen Cove for sure, maybe the worst around the entire north shore. A close second--Ciro's, also on Forest Ave. in Glen Cove. Okay....now it's your turn to add to the list, my fellow hounds.

Nov 13, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Kotobuki in Hauppauge - is it as good as they say?

I dunno....many people told me that Kotobuki was the best. Went on a Friday night, stood in an horrendous crowd waiting to be called to a table in the overly-packed restaurant, where I could see the throng of people waiting for tables (where I had stood for what felt like an hour). They hover, watching for signs of parties finishing up and it makes you uncomfortable as you're eating, feeling as though you need to rush. Not 10 minutes away is a gem of a sushi place in Glen Head, on Glen Head Rd. called Kiraku. Beats Kotobuki by a mile for my liking. Now, maybe if I could try Kotobuki again without the masses of humanity clamoring to get in, perhaps if I could just get a quiet seat at the sushi bar alone (so I wouldn't have to subject my wife and my friends to another crowd scene that felt like a Cecil B. DeMille cast of thousands) I might enjoy it as you all suggest. But before I do that, I implore you to try Kiraku in Glen Head, then post back here so I can get your take, because I've eaten a lot of sushi and sashimi, and for my money, Kiraku tops the list on Long Island. Hinata on Bond Street in Great Neck is kinda good too. Stay away from Yamaguchi in Port Washington, though. Very friendly Yamaguchi family. Very dirty and unimpressive restaurant.

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Hinata
6 Bond St, Great Neck, NY 11021

Kotobuki Restaurant
1530 Old Northern Blvd, Roslyn, NY 11576

Nov 13, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Lost in Woodbury

Yeah...I forgot Wild Fig opened a location there. Listen...they won't knock your socks off, but neither will you go broke. It's half-decent Turkish, and Turkish is usually better than straight Greek (IMHO), since Greek restaurants usually don't serve lamb and only pork. I love pork, but I also love Kefta and Doner and all that Gyro stuff when lamb is mixed in with the beef and not straight beef or beef with pork. The lamb gives a stronger fragrance and adds moisture usually as well. Also, I find that chicken kabob is infinitely better in a Turkish place than it is in a Greek place. You won't find pork in a Turkish place most of the time since Turks are largely Muslim and not Greek Orthodox and therefore don't eat pork. By the same token, the Greek places usually don't serve much in the way of lamb dishes other than, say, lamb chops. If you're ever in the Roslyn area, on Mineola Ave., just north of the L.I. Expwy, the best Turkish place around can be found there--"Chicken Kabob."

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Wild Fig
829 Franklin Ave, Garden City, NY 11530

Nov 04, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Lost in Woodbury

Hey Hungry....check out Butera's. It's right across the street (pretty much) from where you're going. Generous salmon filet. They're Italian by trade, and some of the dishes are good. My wife loves the rigatoni bolognese there. The portions are enormous, but not cheezy enormous. They're good AND enormous. I can't vouch for everything on the menu, since there's a lot of chicken on it and I never order chicken at a restaurant (well, I guess I shouldn't say never) but I've never had a bad meal there. I usually have the salmon because they do it with a nice bit of a crust on it and don't dry it out. The pasta dishes are huge.

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Buteras
65 E Main St, Smithtown, NY 11787

Oct 30, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Bravo! Nader - He had to say it, we can't

Damn....sorry I missed that. Thanks for the reply though, mcf.

Oct 27, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Bravo! Nader - He had to say it, we can't

Yeah, me too, Michele cindy. Nice to see that it's still human to respond to headlines LOL

Oct 23, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Bravo! Nader - He had to say it, we can't

Thanks for the tip, dougnash. I'll give it a go!

Oct 23, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Whole Belly (Ipswich) Fried Clams

It may use the same recipe since 1939, but they need a better recipe! hahahaha. What crap. The french fries are crappy little cold shoestrings, the cole slaw is slimy. I have no use for the place.

Oct 19, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Bravo! Nader - He had to say it, we can't

mcf....interestingly, you mention Bistro Cassis. I assume you're referring to the otherwise charming little place in Huntington. There's only one thing to say about Cassis, and unfortunately, it's the same thing I say about most one-of-a-kind, or "seemingly" one-of-a-kind restaurants on Long Island: Foodiness has become too chic. I can't wait for the fervor to die down. On the surface, popularity would seem a good thing, but too often it's not. The masses have made food the new Hollywood.

When things become popular they also fall prey to becoming cliche and faddish. Ten years ago, a cooking show on prime time could only exist on PBS. Today, kids in study hall discuss what happened last night on Top Chef and Hell's Kitchen. While it's wonderful that culinary arts institutes are filled to capacity with student wannabes who envision opening their own little Cassis one day, sadly, hyperdrive has made most new entry restaurants a big nope.

I've eaten in many of these little charmers and most of them just plain suck. They suck not because the owners have lost passion, although that may be the case as well. They suck in the same way that wannabe guitarists today don't bother to learn to really play their instruments before attempting to be American Idols. They suck because shorthand has become the law of the land in everything.

Once upon a time, people learned their craft. They patiently put in their time and studied. It doesn't matter whether it's cabinet-making or being a restaurateur. And at a decent restaurant, that meant working as a working line chef in a busy, well-reputed kitchen and learning everything there was to learn, certainly for chefs. Can an owner not be a chef? Certainly, but again, he should learn the hospitality business from professionals.

I hate to continue to invoke TV as an example of anything worth discussing, but I saw a particular episode of Ramsay's "Kitchen Nightmares." It featured a very nice middle-aged couple failing (of course...I mean, that's the show, 'eh?) at their life's dream--their restaurant. The amateurism is what seems to make these shows airworthy, apart from the insults that Ramsay dispenses and the antagonism the chefs, maitre d's and proprietors feel toward him.

Not funny, though, was the notion that these people had never worked in restaurants, never owned a restaurant and did not even COOK!!!!! What made them reasonable candidates to present the innocent, unsuspecting public with of all things, a restaurant? The chef was horrific (used frozen foods, especially proteins, cooked the dish entirely and then FROZE it, only to be microwaved on order and served!!!). The place wasn't cheap either (somewhere in the midwest, but I don't mean that disparagingly). For a true cynic, the place was entertainingly horrible.

But, the very idea that someone would want to own and run a restaurant with no prior knowledge and no affection for cooking themselves is beyond me, and I think that this is precisely the problem. These people haven't LOST their passion. Worse, they've INVENTED their passion. We're foodies here. We all know that, like perfect pitch, this love we have for things culinary isn't something one can teach. It's just in us.

So, my wife and I took my mom to Cassis one sunny Sunday morning for brunch. My mother thinks she is discerning about food, but has few innate talents for it, unlike some mothers. She's just as sucked in as most of Americans and can be sold a good presentation based on fluff. This particular morning, the fluff began on our arrival. The obligatory French guy came around with tongs and carrying a tray of bread and a basket of sweet rolls. I didn't buy it. The omelet looked unprofessional, the service was the same, the tables were crammed together so you could rest your elbows in front of the guy beside you. It was fake and it was kind of lousy. It was like visiting France at Disney's Magic Kingdom, but not as good.

There's something about the hospitality biz that is attractive to people. Does that mean we should flock to their little blooming expressions of mid-life crises, their little experiments, and lay down our credit cards for crap food at $20+ entree prices and be impressed with the fact that they have Cinzano ash trays and gingham tablecloths?

Consider this my pet peeve. Dreamers who want to own restaurants and have too little experience should be required to hang signs above their doors that read: "We Want To Be Your Favorite Joint, But We Don't Know What We're Doing."

To all people who fancy themselves restaurateurs:

LEARN THE BUSINESS before you try to take my hundred bucks. And if you can't afford to hire a sommelier, and you don't know wine, then serve less "important" food and don't FEATURE the damned wine. Offer a few decent tried and true reds and whites and knock off the pretentiousness.

Beyond that, we're all good at something in this life. Stick to what you know. If you don't know food service, please...don't open a restaurant.

Oct 19, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive

Whole Belly (Ipswich) Fried Clams

Thanks, phantomdoc. I'm a complete fool for fried oysters as well, but in this case, specific reference to the Ipswich fried clam (whole belly). And, unlike most Long Island/Westchester methods (thanks to probably a mostly Italian influence) what I'm looking for is decidedly NOT breaded with bread crumbs, but a seasoned mixture of corn flour (masa) and wheat flour. I'm going to give Popeis a shot though because after looking at the menu, it looks like good "Island" seafood fare, so thanks for that. Unfortunately, it's not going to be so easy to find a whole belly, with which anyone on Long Island seems to know what to do. I've been searching for years--almost to the point that I'm actually considering opening a place. I just don't know if it would go over down here. It's like New England chowder doesn't really go over so well in NYC restaurants. I'm not saying a good one wouldn't, but who knows? Frankly, most of the chowder in New England these days seems to be testament to it being an almost lost art. While I loved the whole bellies at Woodman's, their chowder was just nothing. Most of the chowder I had on this last run through N.E. wasn't much to write home about. I'm sure there's good chowder out there, though, and I'm hoping you guys will reply to this and list the places.

Oct 15, 2009
Clambelly in General Tristate Archive