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Store Japanese Water Stones in Water?

I made a post on a different forum on this a while back... here's a quote...

Resinoid based stones respond to soaking and drying differently from ceramic, clay based, and magnesia based stones. Magnesia based stones, like the chocera, will crack when over-soaked due to magnesia (the binding agent) leaching out in the water. After a while, the stone looses structural stability. Clay based and ceramic stones do not have any cracking problems unless dropped (or sometimes when they are worn thin and you exert too much pressure in an unsupported section). Vitrified stones work in a similar way to the ceramic and clay based stones, but are often less firm and can break more easily when dropped and/or worn too thin. Resinoid based stones respond to soaking differently. The soaking is actually not the issue at all. Soaking helps soften the stone, causing it to release more abrasive more quickly, improving tactile feedback, and helping create more mud. However, repeated soaking and drying, drying too quickly, or changes in humidity based on environment cause the stone to dry out unevenly. Because resinoid based stones are not as porous, air can not penetrate as quickly, nor can water escape in the same way. As water leaves the outer portion of the stone, the loss of mass causes the outside of the stone to shrink faster than the inside of the stone, which is the main cause of cracking with stones like this. Therefore, when it comes to resinoid based stones, you need to pick one of the following ways of dealing with them:
-soak permanently
-use as a splash and go stone
-soak and dry, but dry very carefully and slowly, while paying attention to general humidity

Jun 04, 2014
JBroida in Cookware

Left handed sashimi knife

save yourself a few bucks and get a sujihiki... its a double bevel slicing knife that will be fine for occasional use for cevice, crudo, etc. As long as the handle is western or octagon shaped, you should be fine.

Apr 26, 2014
JBroida in Cookware
2

Radioactive Japanese knives

for what its worth, there arent many knifemaking areas near the most effected areas... for example, the vast majority of factory produced knives from japan are coming from seki city in gifu prefecture... well away from radioactive concerns. Moreover, the steel used in your shuns is produced in fukui prefecture, again, well away from radioactive concerns.

Sansaire sous vide - my experience as a warning!

i dont know about that... my anova is pretty solid in a home kitchen, and i have quite a few friends who are using them in pro environments

Mar 13, 2014
JBroida in Cookware
2

Why did my Pyrex baking dish explode?

Dec 25, 2013
JBroida in Cookware

Best wine bottle opener

i just read about this in the LA times today... it seems ridiculously cool
http://www.coravin.com/

Dec 07, 2013
JBroida in Cookware

Rustic Canyon with guest chef David Kinch

i was there and enjoyed myself immensely... fun dishes and interesting wines

Nov 12, 2013
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

Japanese knife steels-WTF

sujihiki can be made in a wide variety of sizes, but the most common are 270mm, followed by 300 and 240mm. Larger or shorter than that are not commonly used, as they are often too big or too small for the tasks commonly done by sujihiki. Even when i was in professional kitchens, 330mm would have been overkill for anything we did. 270mm was just right, and 300 was ok too.

Aug 14, 2013
JBroida in Cookware

Japanese knife steels-WTF

i had posted a link to a blog post i had written about these steels here earlier, but it seems it was deleted because i just posted the link... here's what i was trying to link to:

A Quick Summary of Hitachi Carbon Steels Common in Knives
Hitachi makes a number of carbon steels. Here are the common ones found in knives.

SK Steels (sk5, sk4, sk3)- the least expensive of the carbon steels and the lowest carbon content (#5 has the least carbon, #3 the most). This steel has higher amounts of phosphorus and sulfur than the other steels i'm about to mention. This steel tends to be tough (due to the lower carbon content and thus lower hardness). It also tends to be more reactive.

Yellow Steel (yellow 3, yellow 2)- This steel is more pure (less phosphorus and sulfur than the SK Steels). It also has higher carbon content (#3 has less carbon than #2 in this case as well). This steel is commonly found in saws and wood working tools. It is also sometimes found in knives.

White Steel (White 3, white 2, white #1)- This steel is even more pure than yellow steel (which is relatively pure). Once again, the lower the number, the higher the carbon content, so white #1 has the most carbon and white #3 has the least. The higher carbon (and hardness) leads to white #1 having the best edge retention of the white steels and also the best ability to hold an acute angle. White #3 has the best toughness.

Blue Steel (Blue #2 and Blue #1... i'll talk about blue super later)- Blue steel is white steel with chromium and tungsten added to it. Blue #2 has the same amount of carbon as white #2 but has the added elements. Same for blue #1 and white #1. The added elements lead to better corrosion resistance and edge retention (as well as deeper hardening). This also comes at the cost of being more difficult to sharpen and not taking quite as keen of an edge. Blue steel also tends to be more brittle (ever so slight).

Blue Super- Blue super is blue #1 with even more carbon, chromium, and tungsten added to it. Its the best of the hitachi carbon steels with regard to edge retention and ability to hold an acute angle (due to the higher carbon/hardness and added elements). This comes at the cost of being more difficult to sharpen, not getting quite as sharp, and being the most brittle of the bunch.

So, in conclusion, the white steels take the best edge (#1 holding the most acute angle and #3 being the toughest), while the blue steels hold the best edge (Blue super being the best at this while blue #2 and #1 have better toughness).

Aug 14, 2013
JBroida in Cookware

Great cutlery stores - Yoshihiro and Japanese Knife Imports

for what its worth, we've been here for over 2 years (and 3 if you include the year before we had a storefront), but thanks for the writeup

-Jon
(Japanese Knife Imports)

Aug 02, 2013
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

Speaking of weird knife phenomena...

i would advise you to posit this to a metallurgist and see what he/she says (having done this before)

Jun 24, 2013
JBroida in Cookware

Speaking of weird knife phenomena...

magnetic stuff... the only damage comes from people putting them on or taking them off with too much force and/or twisting.

Jun 24, 2013
JBroida in Cookware

Speaking of weird knife phenomena...

there is actually no credible scientific evidence that backs this up... quite the contrary for that matter, both scientifically and practically.

Jun 22, 2013
JBroida in Cookware

Quest for LA's best croissants

tarte tatin in beverly hills should get some love too

Jun 01, 2013
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

Buying Sharpening Stones

the chefs choice has no ability to thin behind the edge (an important part of sharpening), leaves less of a finish, can grind such that the edge looses its shape over time, cant sharpen any traditional single bevel knives, cant sharpen super hard and/or wear resistant steels well, cant maintain angle asymmetry, cant microbevel, and cant adjust based on preference. Stones can, and having taught a bunch of people how to sharpen on stones, i am a firm believer than anyone can learn to do a decent or better job at it.

Feb 06, 2013
JBroida in Cookware

Buying Sharpening Stones

i actually see more damage caused by electric sharpeners like the chefs choice than i do from people trying on stones (i run a knife specialty store and do sharpening here so i see a lot of knives)

Feb 06, 2013
JBroida in Cookware

Whist at the Viceroy- Highly Underrated and Underappreciated

that would have been just about the time that the chef who is currently there was just starting... maybe it took a bit of time to work out the kinks.

Feb 02, 2013
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

Scarpetta DineLA 2013 - Fantastic Experience!

i've had nothing but great experiences there, though i didnt go in for dineLA... glad to hear it went well

Feb 01, 2013
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

Whist at the Viceroy- Highly Underrated and Underappreciated

My wife and I just had dinner last night at Whist at the Viceroy hotel in santa monica. We were celebrating our anniversary, so i asked if they would do a tasting menu for us. We had a number of items from the menu as well as some not from the menu. I dont know why people dont talk about this place more often. The food was great... well balanced flavors, great acidic balance, good salt, etc. From hamachi, to uni, to lamb, and sweetbreads, it was all just great. I should also mention that the waitstaff was really helpful, curious, and knowledgeable.

Anyone else with experience here?

Feb 01, 2013
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

Is there better Italian in LA than Madeo?

Ori's charcuterie program at bestia is amazing too.

Dec 10, 2012
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

Is there better Italian in LA than Madeo?

very true... they are always solid

Dec 09, 2012
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

The best Neapolitan pizza in LA?

sotto is the closest to the pizza i ate when i worked in italy (cooking at a michelin starred place on the amalfi coast)

Dec 09, 2012
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

Is there better Italian in LA than Madeo?

i think il grano and sotto are better than madeo... i also enjoy ado. But madeo has better service in my experience.

Dec 09, 2012
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

The new Spago...any visits?

i posted a bunch of pictures on my company's facebook page of one of our meals if you want to see... (sorry its my business page... thats just where i post my food pictures)
http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?se...

i dont know if i posted the uni pictures as we just had it the other night, but i will soon.

On the desserts, there is this all black chocolate dessert that looks really cool, but it was a bit difficult to eat and was a bit too sweet for my taste. Also, the chocolate morsel dessert thing (a bunch of different truffle sized chocolates) was a bit sweet for my taste, but very inventive. The sorbet is just mindblowingly good and refreshing and the pan perdue was perfectly executed and well balanced.

Dec 01, 2012
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

The new Spago...any visits?

i've been a few times since they reopened and a few times before they remodeled. I've had nothing but great meals since they reopened (though i had a couple of tasting menus and i ordered off the menu only once). Execution was spot on for my meals. I like the new menu, and chef Tetsu Yahagi has a little more free reign on the tasting menus. He's a very talented guy. The uni was great the other night too. The deserts were good, though i liked the fruit desserts more than the chocolate.

Dec 01, 2012
JBroida in Los Angeles Area

A (legitimate) excuse to buy a new knife! Help me find one!

yeah... the knife store in beverly hills closed a while back. Ross cutlery seems ok for western knives, but they use belt grinders on everything and that doesnt work too well on japanese knives.

Jul 17, 2012
JBroida in Cookware

Store Japanese Water Stones in Water?

king 1k is fine living in water... 6k (s1) and 8k (g1) are not

May 22, 2012
JBroida in Cookware

Sashimi knife recommendations?

its called honbadzuke... final sharpening. This can be done by the vendor/maker or end user, but is usually a necessary part of starting to use knives from Japan (both double and single bevel, but more so with single bevel knives). Really, its pretty much just sharpening the knife properly before use... thats about it. I guess the tricky part is sharpening the knife properly.

Mar 27, 2012
JBroida in Cookware

Knife Review: Kobayashi Dojo Nakiri

just to help clarify in this thread, here is how the hitachi paper steels work out:
JIS SK steel is the cheapest and Aogami Super is the most expensive (that would be blue super)... JIS SK Steel (SK4, SK5, etc.) is a simple carbon steel with moderate levels of sulfur and phosphorus in it. Yellow steel is a more pure version of the SK Steel. Yellow 3 has the least carbon, 2 has more carbon, and so on. White steel is a more pure (less sulfur and phosphorus) version of yellow steel. White #3 has the least carbon, white #2 has a bit more, and white #1 has the most carbon. Blue steel is white steel with added chromium and tungsten. Blue #2 has the same amount of carbon as white #2, and blue #1 the same as white #1. Blue super has a bit more carbon, chromium, and tungsten than blue #1.

When comparing the steels normally found in kitchen knives, this is how it breaks down... within white steels, white #1 is the most brittle but has the best edge retention and can hold the keenest edge, while white #3 has the greatest toughness and resists chipping. Blue steels will not take as good of an edge as white steels across the board. However, blue steel has greater edge retention. Blue #2 has the greatest toughness, while blue super has the best edge retention at the expense of often being brittle and not taking quite as keen of an edge (larger carbides due to the alloying elements).

Take this for what it is... a general guideline. Mileage may vary depending on the maker/heat treatment.

Feb 08, 2012
JBroida in Cookware

SHUN knives Chipping while sharpening

15 should be totally fine. Anyways, keep us posted on how things go.

Also, i dont know if this will be much help and i know someone already posted a couple of them here, but i recently put together a playlist on yourube with all of our sharpening videos in one place... maybe you will find some of them helpful:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Feb 03, 2012
JBroida in Cookware