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pesto

I, too, just purée basil and olive oil in my food processor. While surfing the web, a reader suggested placing a spoonful or two in a sandwich bag and flattening the entire glob. It freezes into a space-saving flat sheet, and all you have to do is break off a chunk when you need it. As this pesto is so strong, I found the ice cube size to be too large.

Sep 13, 2012
Heuchera in Home Cooking

The Best Pizza Stones for Home Ovens

After hearing about the wonders of pizza stones, I'm embarrassed to say I just use a heavy aluminum sheet pan and bake my pizza in the middle rack at 450 degrees for 20 minutes. It comes out fine and sure beats those soggy ones I used to get from the local pizzeria.

Sep 13, 2012
Heuchera in Features

do these freeze well?

Galangal is a type of ginger, so I treat it the same as regular ginger. Just peel it and freeze. I find it grates so much easier when frozen. I haven't tried freezing lemon grass, but grew it once in a pot in my New England climate. I went on the internet and learned that if you leave it in water long enough it will sprout roots and can then be planted.
As far as Kaffir lime leaves, I recall asking the Asian owner of his market whether he had any Kaffir lime leaves. He didn't, but he said, "Oh, we just use grated lime rind. It all tastes the same."

Aug 12, 2012
Heuchera in Home Cooking

Grit in my clams - and what didn't work to clean it out

I never have a problem with sand when I use littlenecks, but I do the following with soft shell, or steamer clams which tend to be loaded with grit:
Just pour a couple of handfuls of kosher salt into very warm to hot water. Add the clams. They'll open up in no time flat and spit out the sand. Rinse and do this a time or two more if needed. Make sure to use plenty of salt. Make a final soaking of salt and very cold water. They'll close up again and will be ready to steam.
I usually add a cup of water as a starter, let it boil and then add the clams.

Aug 12, 2012
Heuchera in Home Cooking

Steam, don't boil those hard cooked eggs.

May I add my two cents to those who say that older eggs peel better? We were brought up on a farm where we had access to the very freshest eggs, and my mother said that fresh eggs were just impossible to peel. She said to keep them a week or two before boiling them, so that's what I've done ever since.

And while I'm at it, there's no difference between brown and white eggs. It just has to do with the breed of the chicken. Most farmers had the the type of chicken that laid brown eggs, so a myth arose that brown eggs are better. They're not. So buy whatever is available at the market.

Aug 12, 2012
Heuchera in Home Cooking

Sauerkraut -- like from the barrels

We lived on a farm and my mother would make it from scratch.

Later when we moved off the farm, my mother used Silver Floss brand. This past year I made a batch and discovered the B & G brand in a gallon jar at a local market. It turned out to be the best yet.

It's easy to make and I'm sure you have already been given many good recipes. However, in a pinch, the two above have been pretty good.

Aug 12, 2012
Heuchera in Home Cooking

Cherry Tomato Recipes?

Here's a link to another great recipe using fresh cherry tomatoes. Although it calls for arugula, I have used baby spinach and other greens. It's easy to make and tastes great.

While served warm when first made, this tastes great cold and has become a favorite midnight snack of mine.

Here's the link:
http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/food/...

Enjoy!

Aug 12, 2012
Heuchera in Home Cooking

Cherry Tomato Recipes?

Last year I had the same problem. I grew Sungold tomatoes and never harvested so many in my life! These plants just don't quit. I scoured the web and finally settled upon roasting them for winter use. Everyone had a different method, a different temperature, etc. After reading them all, I finally settled upon the following:
Cut tomatoes in half (if using paste tomatoes, scoop out the seeds)
Toss with:
a few tablespoons of olive oil
a drizzle of balsamic vinegar (this actually gets sweeter when roasted down)
a few cloves of chopped or sliced garlic
salt and pepper if you wish (I didn't)
Place cut side up on a cookie sheet and roast at 350 degrees. This could be about 1 hour (sorry-I forgot to mark down the time from last year). Just keep checking until they shrink and most of the liquid is evaporated. I cool them on the cookie sheet and then place the whole thing in the freezer. Once frozen, they are easily removed. Place them in plastic bags and back in the freezer they go.
I generally use them as a topping for home-made pizza. However, the list is endless as you can use them to make bruschetta, tossed with pasta, in antipasto, in salads, etc.
I have seen countless temperatures used. Some swear by the slow roasting method of about 200+ degrees, but I think running my oven for the many hours this takes is a waste. I tried it but frankly could not discern any difference. One site mentioned 400+ degrees, but this was way too hot. I found that placing them in the middle rack at the happy medium of 350 was about right.
The reason I chose roasting is that I was very short on freezer space, so needed a compact way to store them. Roasting brings out a strong, rich flavor and I surely enjoyed using them all this past winter. In fact, I just finished up the last and now my current crop is ripening.

Aug 12, 2012
Heuchera in Home Cooking

What is your biggest recipe pet peeve?

Any recipe with a name that ends in Delight or Surprise.

Aug 10, 2012
Heuchera in Home Cooking