mangeur's Profile

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Le Galopin

LOL! Our favorites are so good that we don't have time to try the new kids. ;)

about 18 hours ago
mangeur in France
1

Le Galopin

Indeed. Last night, with more help in the (miniscule) kitchen, Tischenko spent time in the dining room, albeit continually tasting at the pass. He seemed much more relaxed, even jovial (for him). I think that summer closures can't come soon enough for many small restaurants.

about 20 hours ago
mangeur in France

Le Galopin

First a disclaimer: This is not an unbiased post. Upfront, I love this place.

I won't bother to describe tonight's outstanding meal because the ingredients change every night. You can count on 5 to 7 small plates which center around a wee piece or so of protein amid a joyous tumble of herbs and acid, vegetable and fruit, resulting in an unpredictable explosion of flavors.

As I told the chef tonight, "I am a very good cook. All of my life I have gone to good restaurants to learn and to mimic. I come here time after time because I never have a () clue what is on my plate. See you in December."

Two (no choice) menus, one bottle sparkling water, one bottle Alexandre Bain Pouilly Fume = 144€.

1 day ago
mangeur in France
2

The Table d'hote at Comte Senard

Aha! Thanks for lifting the scales from my eyes. Reviewing the brochure, I see the communal tables. These we love in simple settings but realize how oppressive they might be with a serious (and competitive) group.

Jul 29, 2014
mangeur in France

How do the French get their food?

I live only several blocks from SF's second Chinatown (as opposed to first or third, fourth, et al). I have access to brilliantly fresh fish, decent pork and poultry, certain acceptable cuts of beef and tons of very reasonable produce. There is even an Asian run organic produce store that sells excellent stuff at well below Whole Foods.

I shop the carriage trade markets for superior beef and best quality poultry.

Jul 28, 2014
mangeur in France

The Table d'hote at Comte Senard

Hi, Kurtis.

I think one can approach these kinds of tasting opportunities in several ways. The serious approach where wine is the overriding interest, food a counterpoint and, well, people are just short of a problem. Or think of it as a joyous ride where all come together, jostling for importance during the meal.

At this point, I have changed course to keep things simple. We will be staying in Puglingy Montrachet and I don't want to ask DH to drive the 20some km after drinking what is probably an illegal amount of wine. So I have booked dinner instead at Olivier Leflaive, just down the street so we can crawl home. :)

I realize that the Leflaive experience will not come up to the Comte Senard in terms of either food or wine, but it will be a laidback evening and with luck enjoyable. And we are not terribly serious people.

I do hope to lunch at Comte Senard on another visit. I will definitely look for your report on it in September.

Jul 28, 2014
mangeur in France

The Table d'hote at Comte Senard

Thanks. Coming from you, that's a strong rec.

Jul 28, 2014
mangeur in France

How do the French get their food?

And they aren't in the US? http://www.businessweek.com/articles/...

Jul 27, 2014
mangeur in France

How do the French get their food?

"Eating better quality food, but in lesser quantity is an option."

This certainly works with chocolate and ice cream.

Jul 27, 2014
mangeur in France

The Table d'hote at Comte Senard

Any strong opinions on this lunch/tasting? So far, I am finding lukewarm comments both pro and con.

Jul 27, 2014
mangeur in France

How do the French get their food?

We buy much produce at a weekly flea market. Purchased by the seller at the end of the business week, we find ready-to-eat fruit, often organic, at very reasonable prices. Many shoppers are ethnic and indeed eagerly shop here. In fact, I would propose that immigrants bring with them a much higher familiarity with and desire for fresh produce than do natives here. Somewhere in the middle of the last century, America became a processed food junky, only compounded by the length of their work week and commute.

Jul 27, 2014
mangeur in France

How do the French get their food?

Very true. I can buy extraordinary meat, fish and produce but it isn't cheap. I took a visiting hound to my local market and he agreed that the stuff looked great but that it was horribly expensive.

In the US, those with income for good food eat well. Those struggling can't even afford supermarket produce. In the country, I frequently see older shoppers pick up a package of meat (at home, I wouldn't touch packaged meat!), glance at the price, shake their head and put it back. No way would or could these people pay more for top quality. I don't think that fresh produce is in their vocabulary.

Jul 27, 2014
mangeur in France
1

How do the French get their food?

Or as an octogenarian French friend rails when such subject comes up, blame it on the devil incarnate, Monsanto.

Jul 27, 2014
mangeur in France

Day 3 San Francisco Reviews - Humphry Slocombe Ferry Plaza, Three Babes Bakeshop, Fog City, Tout Sweet Patisserie, Nico, A16

We haven't returned to Frances for several years. You are correct. It isn't trendy or hip. A hot table was, probably, what I meant to say.

The first time we ate at Frances, we sat at the bar next to the chef's father. Service was adorable and he was tremendously interesting, feeding us backstory on the place. Our second visit was at the first table. The vibes were entirely different, service less personal, food merely okay by our standards. We haven't bothered to try to return.

Jul 26, 2014
mangeur in San Francisco Bay Area

Day 3 San Francisco Reviews - Humphry Slocombe Ferry Plaza, Three Babes Bakeshop, Fog City, Tout Sweet Patisserie, Nico, A16

This has become our "local". It is the closest we've found in town that is similar to the young restaurants we frequent in Paris. This is not the usual San Francisco/California hip plates, like Francis et al, but rather subtle and refined in both flavors and portion size. Not for those who need big cuts of protein and servings of starch.

Jul 26, 2014
mangeur in San Francisco Bay Area

Paris - Saturday lunch

"...Chez Michel as the King of joyless ambiance..."

We only survived one evening there, but rather than joyless it was more like dining in a war zone. The waitstaff standing around for long stretches, not withstanding all kinds of lapsed service, interspersed with active combat with Breton as he exploded out of the kitchen into their space behind the bar. Quite unnerving.

Jul 24, 2014
mangeur in France

Paris - Saturday lunch

Christophe not open Saturday lunch according to Lobrano.

How about Le Voltaire for guaranteed no protest?

Jul 24, 2014
mangeur in France

Paris - Saturday lunch

Jeanne B

Jul 24, 2014
mangeur in France

Paris - Saturday lunch

Chez Denise is only open Monday through Friday.

Jul 24, 2014
mangeur in France

NYT opines on restaurant outsourcing

This law reminds me of the US certified organic law that has so many loopholes that Monsanto could crawl through it.

Jul 23, 2014
mangeur in France

Disappointed by LE FOODING these days. And you?

As for "good dishes of the day", this is precisely what we already expect in the small, unpretentious restaurants we frequent. Except for house-made bread and butter, plates are seldom repeated, reflecting seasonal and market conditions and, more importantly, the imagination and whims of the chef. (Hey, we got these names from you...)

Jul 23, 2014
mangeur in France

Fait Maison

Patronize open kitchen restaurants.

Jul 23, 2014
mangeur in France
1

Disappointed by LE FOODING these days. And you?

My yardstick for success is how well an entity fulfills its mission. From my perspective, Le Fooding is successful at early discovering and writing up the evolving dining scene. Over time, it will necessarily cover pop trends when they become important players as well as new serious restaurants and young emerging chefs. This is both necessary and expected.

Le Fooding provides me with timely news. Some is of limited interest, but the same would be true of any other source. I ignore what doesn't pertain to my life and eagerly glom onto those addresses that sound like our kind of place.

Jul 22, 2014
mangeur in France

Pouic-Pouic

It would be wrong to fatwa Le Machon d'Henri. It is a strangely singular little place. We've been returning probably once a year for 20 plus years. It is hard to describe. Food is quite okay if you order simply. We've enjoyed the same weekday server since the first time we walked in. The place is filled with modest and well behaved tourists, not the demanding and entitled sort that you often run into in more upscale places. They are multinational couples, families, singles, often completely baffled by the handwritten chalkboards. But the waiter helps with generic translations and the table next to them fills in the blanks. The single cook works in a closet sized space, steps out periodically to check how diners approve of his plates and blows kisses to regulars. Yes, there are lots of neighborhood regulars and longtime returning visitors, like us. This place has simple soul. We always leave with a smile and resolve to return, even though it cashes a horded dinner slot.

Jul 22, 2014
mangeur in France
1

Pouic-Pouic

Naw, go ahead and rec Machon d'Henri. No one will go. it will remain a sweet and down-to-earth place. it doesn't draw the same crowd as Chez Fernand and friends.

Jul 22, 2014
mangeur in France

How A Major American Travel Magazine--Conde Nast Traveler--Gets Paris Food Shopping Hilariously Wrong!

Hint: We learned about the pain d'epices flavor from our hostess in Santenay who told us her intriguing dressing for greens was made with this mustard.

Jul 21, 2014
mangeur in France
1

French food - boring? Yes, according to the Daily Telegraph

In the US food press and on menus both here and in France, crumbles, both sweet and savory, have been super-trendy for a couple of years.

Jul 21, 2014
mangeur in France

Five Days in the 15th

Rue Saint Charles is an outstanding food shopping street. (Of course, I'm biased since it hosts a Mervielous de Fred shop.)

Jul 20, 2014
mangeur in France

Disappointed by LE FOODING these days. And you?

"And whether in French or English, the reviews of Balls and the Grilled Cheese Factory refer to decidedly horrific restaurants that would never have gotten a look-in from Le Fooding when it first started out, hence my original post."

Indeed we reel from the ink that is allotted to this type of current and popular eatery. Nor would I spend a nano-second in line at a food truck. But these are the trends of our times. I have no doubt that neither of us would be tempted to visit either of your examples, but they do illustrate the kinds of new food venues that the (French) public is interested in supporting.

Perhaps this is what you meant by PR driven, but in the larger scheme of things, a reporting vehicle (i.e., Le Fooding) has to write about the kinds of places that their constituency wants to read about and to patronize.

Jul 19, 2014
mangeur in France

Disappointed by LE FOODING these days. And you?

The personal bias certainly didn't refer to you but rather to the blogs. Blogs are essentially written as an expression of personal opinion so it would be quite out of the norm, IMHO, for a blog to aim for scientific neutrality. When it comes to food, personal taste and preference are hard to overcome.

eta, all I have tried to say is that I find Le Fooding a valuable tool in learning about new dining rooms in Paris and insolite places I might miss in the country. LF is never the last word for me, any more than any recommendation from newspaper, blog or word of mouth. These are all tools that help us find the food we are looking for.

Jul 19, 2014
mangeur in France
1