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Bucky Badger's Profile

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How do you drain grease from your stock pots or dutch ovens?

Yes, I agree. After I pour off the grease, I cool it in the refrigerator, which hardens the tallow. I then store the tallow in my freezer and put the gelatinized remainder of the grease back into the chili. When our winter temperatures dip below freezing, the birds around here love the tallow cakes that we put out for them.

Aug 28, 2009
Bucky Badger in Home Cooking

How do you drain grease from your stock pots or dutch ovens?

I thought of doing this, but any sieve or colander large enough to contain six pounds of beef will probably be a bowl shape. If you have a bowl-shaped sieve resting in a bowl, doesn't that leave the bottom of the sieve soaking in the grease which has collected in the bowl?

Any chance you know the makes and models of sieve and bowl you're using?

Aug 28, 2009
Bucky Badger in Home Cooking

How do you drain grease from your stock pots or dutch ovens?

I like the idea of using a turkey baster, but all of these other responses have given me something to think about. I have always made my chili by browning six pounds of ground beef and pork, after which I drain the grease (about 2 cups worth). I *could* leave the grease in the chili until it's done, then skim it off the next day. However, I'm not sure how well this would work. I'd think that I could get more of the tallow out before adding additional ingredients to the browned meat.

Aug 28, 2009
Bucky Badger in Home Cooking

How do you drain grease from your stock pots or dutch ovens?

About a year ago, I was making my favorite meal (chili), and while I was draining grease from my pot with the pot lid acting as the strainer, it occurred to me that there had to be a better way. With the exception of the one time the lid slipped and I filled my sink with the contents of the pot, using the lid to drain liquids has worked. However, I just bought a 7.25 quart dutch/french oven and it is heavy. I just don't want to drain hot liquids using lids anymore.

Colanders are great for draining water, but I don't see how they'd work with grease. Water can go straight down the drain, grease can't. So the question I have is: how do you drain grease from your stock pots or dutch ovens?

Aug 28, 2009
Bucky Badger in Home Cooking