Jake Dear's Profile

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SoPi recomendations

Mangeur, well said as usual. -- Jake

Apr 07, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Michelin restaurant for Saturday lunch?

We went there (Cafe Panique) a few years ago, and then recommended it here a couple times, but I can't recall any follow-up reports about it. It had (still has?) self-taught woman chef; we were quite impressed by the cooking and the interesting room. We would be interested to hear an update. -- Jake

Mar 13, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Report: 8 Days in the Cote d’Or (w/ lunches in Ronchamp & Lyon) in January.

I always look forward to your annual report, thanks for this one. We will return to Chez Guy next month, and hope for your table by the fire. -- Jake

Mar 10, 2014
Jake Dear in France

What are your thoughts of this restaurant corkage fee policy?

The Passionfish list and pricing is indeed great. Not exactly $5 over retail -- but very friendly pricing compared with so many others. -- Jake

Mar 07, 2014
Jake Dear in Wine

Looking for restaurant near Musee de Quai Branly for lunch or dinner

I just checked my Fork/Fourchett "account settings" -- and altho I see a box for postal code, mine is empty, and so apparently I signed up without entering that info -- you might try the same. -- Jake

Feb 20, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Looking for restaurant near Musee de Quai Branly for lunch or dinner

You can go to TheFork.com -- the English language version of LaFourchette – and use the same reservation site in English. -- Jake

Feb 20, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Sete

Re la Coquerie, I wrote this a while ago about our dinner there in Sept 2012:

Dinner the next night was at La Coquerie,1 chemin du Cimetière Marin. This was one of our top three meals of our southern trip (lunch at Jardin des Sens and dinner at Faurie were the others). This small place is a 20 minute walk from the bustle of the town and canal, in a residential area (next to the cemetery) quietly overlooking the sea. There’s seating for about 12-14 inside, where you can watch chef Anne Majourel, a twinkle in her eye under a cocky cool hat, work behind the counter. There is seating for 6-9 outside at three terraced tables under substantial rectangular umbrellas with a partial view of the harbour/sea. It was too stuffy/hot inside, and so we dined out. Not inexpensive, but great ingredients from the nearby bustling “Halles de Sète.” (Where we went each morning for a simple breakfast of express and regional yogurt. -- Jake

Feb 13, 2014
Jake Dear in France

best brasserie in paris

This keeps reminding me to try Stella "again." I called to reserve a few years ago -- and my accent was apparently so bad, they just hung up on me. But I've slightly improved since then, and will muster the courage for another phone try later this year. -- Jake

Feb 06, 2014
Jake Dear in France

best brasserie in paris

"Why brasserie ?" For "one meal," this is very understandable to me. I was at that point in our first few visits, and still look for that atmosphere every once in a while. Some seek to soak up ambiance that they've seen depicted or read about from yesteryear. And if you stick to fruits de mer, or some cooked to order dishes, it can be a good and fun time. *Sometimes* it's just not all about the food. By the way, we like the Rotonde (but closed for renovation, as noted) and the little Brasserie de L'Isle Saint-Louis. -- Jake

Feb 05, 2014
Jake Dear in France
1

Am I the Only One Who Doesn't Like Pinot Noir?!

+2. I've lurked on this board for quite some time, but just noticed this thread. I really appreciate the knowledge here and the generous sharing of it. -- Jake

PS, to stay on topic: We find a place for most varietals and blends, but have special affection for red Burgundy and balanced new world Pinot Noir, such as Calera, Littorai, ABC, etc.

Jan 30, 2014
Jake Dear in Wine

Overnight hotel & dinner in the Rhone valley, somewhere between Vienne and Tain-l’Hermitage/ Touron-sur-Rhone?

Update: We've decided to stay overnight at a maison d'hote in the vineyards, just outside Ampuis, http://lagerine.com, mentioned earlier (thanks for the lead, mangeur). The helpful proprietor has recommended to us nothing for dinner on a Thursday night in his own nearby town; instead he's listed four dinner possible options for us -- all about a 10 minute drive, which we hoped to avoid but may do anyway. For the use of others similarly situated (and in case anyone here can offer comments) I’ll quote him {with some of my notes} below:

AUBERGE DE LA SOURCE à Tupin et Semons, Style Bistrot around the vineyards decent prices very nice wine list Tél 00 33 474 59 54 03. {We are leaning toward this, which apparently also offers a nice view over Condrieu/Cote Rotie and the river below -- we found a website here: http://www.restaurant-auberge-la-source.fr/; and for what it's worth: http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g187265-d3142506-Reviews-Auberge_de_la_Source-Lyon_Rhone_Rhone_Alpes.html.}

DOMAINE DE CLAIREFONTAINE, excellent gastronomique et belle carte des vins www.domaine-de-clairefontaine.fr, domaine.de.clairefontaine@gofornet.com. {Note, of course this has been mentioned earlier.}

LE COTTAGE (Marais St Jean) Ouvert le soir à partir du jeudi; cuisine simple et très bonne excellent rapport / prix endroit très agréable Site : www.domaine-de-clairefontaine.fr, email : lecottage@domaine-de-clairefontaine.fr {Note: according to the website, this is "Our new establishment, Le Cottage, opened in July 2013! Located at 800m far away from the Domaine, on the top of the village . . . ."}

L’ESPACE PH3 14 Bd Fernand Point à Vienne: Petit restaurant du grand restaurant gastronomique La Pyramide, www.lapyramide.com Tél : 00 33 4 74 53 01 96. {Note, we probably will pick countrside over Vienne, unless we hear great things aboput this one.}

-- Jake

Jan 27, 2014
Jake Dear in France

An overnight from Paris

In Barbizon a few years ago we enjoyed dining at L'Angelus. La Clé d'Or also looked very good, when return we will go there. And it's lovely to stroll around nearby Moret sur Loing. -- Jake

Jan 22, 2014
Jake Dear in France

An overnight from Paris

We stayed there (maison de moyen) two nights in 2011. Wonderful, it was. Table d'hote offered sometimes as well. -- Jake

Jan 22, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Overnight hotel & dinner in the Rhone valley, somewhere between Vienne and Tain-l’Hermitage/ Touron-sur-Rhone?

Salut Melanie, thanks for this, we may try it if we go down that far for our overnight stop. And the Yapp site is good. (PS, and thanks for all of your helpful recs and comments here in the Bay Area.)

Also, for the possible use of others, I've received another lead, linked from yet another wine site, http://www.domaine-clusel-roch.fr/?page=bonnes-adresses, yielding this "not unpromising" chambre d'hote, http://lagerine.com/ -- Jake

Jan 20, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Burgundy maps: Climats; Lieux-dits -- definitions/differences?

Yes, and I did notice that the responses didn't exactly mesh! Cheers, -- Jake

Jan 20, 2014
Jake Dear in Wine

Burgundy maps: Climats; Lieux-dits -- definitions/differences?

Hi plaidbowtie and zin1953, I meant to say as few days ago, thanks for your responses. -- Jake

Jan 20, 2014
Jake Dear in Wine

Dining in beautiful Brittany (and a few quick notes about Paris) in September 2013

Hi johannabanana, It was about what we'd hoped. Very good; but not the tops. Yet we would happily return. (Our favorite dinner of the trip was the first, at Chateau Locguenole; Le Coquillage and La Table de Breizh Café, completely different from each other, were tied for second.) I'll include pics from each below.

At Le Coquillage there are two menus, 135 and 62 (we took the 62) and two seafood menus (71 and 68). We suspect the seafood menus would be superb. With our menu there, prior to the lamb for two mentioned earlier, we had as entrees, "Tartare de daurade, single malt et 'moutarde celtique,' " and "Pommes de terre nouvelles," with grey shallot and Pollock, cooked in their baker's oven, in a building on the beautiful hotel grounds overlooking the bay.

The pictures below: First, oysters in celery root puree at Locguenole; Second, Hotel de Bricourt, which houses Le Coquillage; Third, the lamb (one of two plates for two) at Le Coquillage; Fourth, the pre sale lamb at Table de Breizh Café; Fifth, view from our counter seats at Table de Breizh Café. -- Jake

Jan 19, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Dining in beautiful Brittany (and a few quick notes about Paris) in September 2013

More about Cancale: We found it a magical site and lovely town. Some pictures help tell the story, I'll attach them here.

First pic (you have to click on it to widen the view) is Les Rimains. Second, a piper overlooking the exposed oyster beds at low tide. Third (again, click on it to see the wide view) the harbor at low tide. Fourth, where the lambs graze, about 40 minutes from Cancale. Fifth, view from one of out two windows in the morning. -- Jake

Jan 19, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Overnight hotel & dinner in the Rhone valley, somewhere between Vienne and Tain-l’Hermitage/ Touron-sur-Rhone?

Salut countryside travelers, we are hoping to find a stopover. In late April/early May we will be driving from Puligy-Montrachet down to the Camargue (Mas de la Forge, per Randy B and mangeur -- thanks!). We’d like to find a hotel/restaurant for an overnight stop on or near the Rhone, below Vienne. We've focused on Condrieu, but the pickings seem slim? We are looking at Le Beau Rivage, http://www.hotel-beaurivage.com/en , and it may be OK, but we aren’t convinced it’s a good fit. Nor do the few other places we'd identified just north of there, in the Cote Roti, seem quite right, although Hotel Domaine des Vignes, http://hoteldomainedesvignes.com/ , which is quite walkable from restaurants in Ampuis, is a possibility. (And it would move to the top of our list if there are well recommended restaurants in Ampuis?) And of course there is the Domaine de Claire Fontaine, http://www.domaine-de-clairefontaine...., but it's inland, and in any event we are not sure it's a good fit.

We are also open to making the stopover farther south -- as far as Tain-l’Hermitage/ Touron-sur-Rhone, if someone has a good recommendation for that area -- again on or quite near the Rhone, SVP. Thanks for any help. — Jake

Jan 17, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Dining in beautiful Brittany (and a few quick notes about Paris) in September 2013

More about books to get into a Bretagne mood: It won't be in the league with the book that mangeur and Ptipois are describing, but very accessible and fun to read is "I'll Never be French (no matter what I do)," by Mark Greenside -- a New Yorker/ Californian's warm and playful story about falling in love with a tiny Celtic village in the Finistere. (We only glanced into this far western area, and it's high on our list for the next visit out there.)

I'd been reading, and put aside, the highly regarded and interesting but, to me so far rather ponderous, "The Oysters of Locmariaquer," by Eleanor Clark -- a 1965 classic, winner of the National Book Award, about much more than Brittany's Belon oysters. -- Jake

Jan 15, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Dining in beautiful Brittany (and a few quick notes about Paris) in September 2013

Salut francaise, We had the same lamb in one of the fine dishes at "La Table de Breizh Café" -- the Japannese resto described in my OP. And we saw it offered on other local menus/cartes in and around Cancale. Speaking of Cancale, I never really did answer about spending more than two days there: We could happly stay much longer -- there is so much to experience in and around, with excusions to many other nearby sites and towns, St. Malo of course included. I'll try to post more about that (and still keep it food oriented) in a few days . . . . -- Jake

Jan 14, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Dining in beautiful Brittany (and a few quick notes about Paris) in September 2013

Salut francaise, we were there 8 nights, starting Sept 8. Our four one-night stays violated our usual 2-night minimum approach -- but after researching I got greedy and could not eliminate. Even then, we missed going even farther west (where Breton is even more prevalent than where we were), which had been the original plan. That part will have to be for our next trip to this lovely region.

Weather: It's so quickly changable -- in 15-20 minutes, it could go from clear to massive clouds to threats of rain, and then back to clear again. I think you have always got to expect rain out there. Looking back, we had 1.5 days of lousy weather, pas mal . . . .

Would we do anything different in hindsight? Well, just that we would stay longer -- and avoid Le Cargo! -- Jake

Jan 13, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Dining in beautiful Brittany (and a few quick notes about Paris) in September 2013

Hello France CH board, as partial thanks for all your assistance previously -- and with this most recent trip in particular -- here’s a belated summary of dining in stunningly beautiful Bretagne (and a few quick endnotes about Paris dining) in September 2013:

We took the TGV to Lorient, then drove to Chateau Locguenole, in 56700 Kervignac, http://www.chateau-de-locguenole.com/ . For two nights we had a lovely (upgraded) room and one dinner in the intimate and elegant starred restaurant downstairs. We ordered a la carte; most memorable dishes: oysters in a celery root puree; lobster in local spices (was it Kari Grosse?); turbot in white Burgundy with truffles . . . . Lunch south of there, nearish Carnac: Le Petit Hôtel du Grand Large -- also one star -- but a very different and casual feel. http://www.lepetithoteldugrandlarge.fr/. There we had excellent seafood accompanied by an aged Muscadet, and we enjoyed speaking with the three women who run the front of the house. Then on a Monday night, with few other options, we had a totally uninspired and disappointing dinner at a portside place recommended to us -- Le Cargo, in 56570 Locmiquelic -- we should have just gone to a local crêperie.

Next on to Pont-Aven, and Le Moulin de Rosmadec, http://www.moulinderosmadec.com, another one-star place. Nice setting in the middle of this busy touristy town, but the restaurant disappointed a bit -- for example, a lobster dish was too fussed up and hid the taste of the lobster. Nearby for lunch after hiking the Aven river -- first upstream and then downstream to its mouth -- we had traditional crêpes in the thatched roof Chez Angele, www.creperie-chezangele.fr, which we understand from Ptipois is under new ownership. It now appears to be a husband/wife operation (she does the cooking and he seriously and efficiently runs the front) and the crepes were quite good. Farther west and on the coast we had another good seafood lunch below Quimper, in 29120 Sainte-Marine (opposite Benodet) at Bistrot du Bac, http://www.trimen.fr/en/the-restaurants/a-bistrot-from-the-sea/. No comparison with the excellent Le Petit Hôtel du Grand Large, tho.

Moving inland, we stayed overnight at the striking Manoir de Kerledan, in 29270 Carhaix-Plouguer, Finistère. http://www.kerledan.com/ Very good, and a fun table d’hote, but the nice British proprietors seem to attract mostly English-speaking guests? Still, we did enjoy dining and talking with our Dutch tableneighbors.

Until now the weather had been great, with marvelous clouds; but then it turned gray and gloomy. Off to Roscoff (forgetting iPhone cables and such in the room, if you go to the Manoir you can ask for ours). Lots of Brits in this ferry-port town. After a short local ferry ride to cold and windy Ile de Bratz (and darn, mangeur’s recommended “TyYann” has changed name and proprietor, and we were not able to lunch there), we checked in at Hotel Temps de Vivre, http://www.letempsdevivre.net/en/ (their former restaurant is no more) and walked across town to dinner at the too brightly lit Les Alizes, http://www.les-alizes-roscoff.com/. Food and service were OK, not great, and I could not even finish the huge portion of moules. Another darn: Pitipois’ recommended crêperie, Ty Saozon, was closed on our day there (a Thursday); and so we went to another down the same street, Crêperie La Chandeleur, it was quite good enough.

Now driving east: After a quick detour thru Morlaix (what an interesting site for that interior city), and then a traffic delay in some bouchons on the N12 and hence failure to get in for lunch in St-Brieuc at either Youpala Bistrot or Aux Pesked (in that order; they both looked nice tho!) we tried to find but could not l’Arbalaise; finally, after a frustrating and not so funny comedy of errors, we ended up at a nice little dive, Le Bistro du Marin, in 22190 Plerin, where we got the last table at 13:30 and had excellent and simple salad, house white, and dandy moules-frites. We then drove on to 22400 Planguenoual, Manoir de la Hazaie, http://www.manoir-hazaie.com/chambres-d-hotes.html, a lovely B&B with a limited table d’hote (Christine accepts reservations for only 6 covers at three separate candelabra-set tables in this ancient manoir). Home made foie gras, etc., and reasonably priced wines selected by her husband, Jean-Yves; solid cooking, nice folks.

The sun came back, and we were off to Cancale -- probably the highlight of our lovely clockwise tour. On recommendation of DCM, mangeur, and I think also Souphie, we stayed two nights at Les Rimains, http://www.maisons-de-bricourt.com/les-Maisons-de-Bricourt/les-rimains.php, and splurged for the Badienne room -- the most dramatic room we’ve ever experienced, with breakfast in front of our fireplace. We dined at Olivier Roellinger’s Le Coquillage (the main dish we recall: Lamb from Mont Saint-Michel, for two), located in the Hotel of Les Maisons De Bricourt -- a private car takes you to the restaurant from Les Rimains. Next night, for a change of pace, we enjoyed walking to diner at La Table de Breizh Café, the restaurant (one *) above the café -- where we sat at the bar watched the Japanese chefs prepare our costy but excellent plates.

Also in Cancale, we had two nice seafood lunches at L’Ormeau 4 quai Thomas F, and Le Troquet, 19 quai Gambetta -- both right on the harbor, both in Michelin -- both a bit touristy, but what the heck, and at least we were with French tourists.

In St. Malo, before dropping the car and taking the train back to Paris, we tried to have lunch at the Bordier place, Restaurant Autour du Beurre , http://www.lefooding.com/restaurant/restaurant-autour-du-beurre-saint-malo.html, but it was closed (Monday). We should have gone to Restaurant Le Cambusier, very nearby, www.cambusier.fr; http://www.lefooding.com/restaurant/restaurant-le-cambusier-saint-malo.html ; but instead chose the old fashioned place, Al la Duchesse Anne, http://www.restaurant-duchesse-anne.com/, which was OK, but no more.

PS: We wanted to get over to Parigi’s recommended ferme auberge, http://www.ferme-de-mesauboin.com/, but it just did not fit in. We really loved these parts of Brittany, and recall fondly the dramatic clouds, tides, and great walks. We will certainly return.

By the way, in Paris, we went right away to Brasserie d’ile St Louis for our standard first small lunch of omelet, herring in oil, green salad, and Riesling; we liked Ober-Salé (about our visit, more here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/917437#8351146 ); we enjoyed Moissonier; Dans Les Landes; happily returned to H Kitchen; liked both Au Bon Coin and Pirouette; and we had a pleasing return to the simple and tiny Le Timbre. After avoiding it for many years we finally went to Café Constant, lunching upstairs with others from this board and a room of Japanese tourists. Le Cinq was a great experience, described in part (except for our impromptu post-lunch kitchen tour at about 16:00) here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/917374. Two of our other favorites this trip were Le Petit Verdot (see more here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8995... -- and it’s just fine with us if it doesn’t become a favorite of others), and Les Climats (a Bourgogne term denoting specific vineyard sites, I believe?) -- the cooking is French with an Asian (Vietnamese?) sense, and an exclusively Burgundy list -- we were in heaven there, sitting in the beautiful atrium. -- Jake

Jan 12, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Selling a wine collection

If the other local options downthread don't work out -- and before you agree on a price if you decide to sell -- I second K&L (the auction folks are in Redwood City I think). I could be wrong, but I do suspect you'd do much better with these wines at auction rather than selling them locally. K&L charges no buyers' commission (unlike most other auction houses, which charge substantial ones) -- and this, I think, makes buyers more willing to purchase on this site, and hence may result in a good sale figure -- at least it has in my experience. My listings with K&L for the last year have sold at good figures, and for an average of 25-40 percent above the "reserve" -- some to buyers in Asia and Russia, and others to flush Silicon Valley types. (The auction reserve is the minimum figure at which you agree to sell.)

Note for others who may not simply be looking for cash: You can even avoid the seller's commission (15 percent) if you happen to want to take your proceeds in K&L store credit, which is what I do -- thus turning things we no longer like all that much, or that have simply become too costy, into other wines that we now prefer. . . . ) -- Jake

Jan 12, 2014
Jake Dear in Wine

Burgundy maps: Climats; Lieux-dits -- definitions/differences?

Norman and Taylor, in "The Great Domaines of Burgundy" (3rd ed 2010) say in their glossary that these two terms are basically interchangeable. Jasper Morris, "Inside Burgundy" (2010, what an amazing tome!) says essentially the same -- his glossary entry for Climat is "a named area of vineyard"; for Lieu-dit, he says "A named place, or vineyard, almost interchangeable with climat."

The relatively new book (in French, which I read poorly) "Climats et Lieux-Dits des Grands Vignobles de Bourgogne" (Sept 2012), by Silvian Pitiot & Marie-Helene Landrieu-Lussigny, obviously draws a distinction -- to the point of providing separate (excellent) full page maps side-by-side for each village, one labeled "climats" and the other "lieux-dits," showing slight changes one from the other in vineyard names. (And yet as mentioned in Morris's book, his (great) maps originate from the same maps by Silvian Pitiot & Pierre Poupon that are apparently the source for the recent Climats et Lieux-Dits book.) Can someone shed light -- what is the distinction in these two terms, especially as so carefully highlighted in the recent book? I infer from some of the maps in the Climats et Lieux-Dits book that climats are a more precise subset of lieux-dits? Thanks -- Jake

Jan 12, 2014
Jake Dear in Wine

Où sont les Saved Threads d'antan ?

Here's another request to "have back a dedicated place on Chowhound to save these threads." (I do like some of the other recent changes -- but this particular one, it seems, goes in the wrong direction, for no apparent good reason.) -- Jake

Dec 04, 2013
Jake Dear in Site Talk
1

The new Spring book, written and illustrated by Daniel Rose with Sophie Brissaud, is out.

Great news -- we will be happy to see it. (We have heard of it and have been waiting for quite a while.) And many congrats, Ptipois! -- Jake (& Mo!)

Nov 09, 2013
Jake Dear in France

Lazare

"Or longer," indeed. This place will have a big asterisk on our list until I read otherwise from others whom I trust as much as Meg. -- Jake

Nov 06, 2013
Jake Dear in France

Birthday dinner, ~100€ total

"La Cagouille ... if I want to eat fish in Paris. It is not obviously celebratory...." We agree that our fish was excellent. But also that it does not feel celebratory. To us, the decor and ambiance was rather 1980s. Nice wine list, tho. -- Jake

Oct 30, 2013
Jake Dear in France

Les Premices

Thanks, this goes on the list. -- Jake

Oct 18, 2013
Jake Dear in France