Jake Dear's Profile

Title Last Reply

Provence report July 2014 part 1 (Luberon)

Dandy report. Re "Le Petit Cafe," the location is at the point of the triangle intersection along the street, 40 or so meters before the cave, as you are walking from the little "place" in the center of the village. I'm wondering if the cafe is now open, if at all, only during the day, when the cave is open for dinner? -- Jake

Jul 22, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Five Days in the 15th

"Les Trois Garcons" -- did you ever go there? I've seen no recent report here. (The very negative service reviews in French on TA give pause.) -- Jake

Jul 20, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Need Help in Provence foodie itinerary!

Salut Robert, thanks for this, and any other notes you may have re "Flocons" (yikes, I just noticed that I mistyped the first time) de Sel, where we will indeed stay two nights -- for a special anniversary. Yes, we love Haute-Savoie cheeses. But big breakfasts like that (I can imagine from a few others) are usually just too much for us. We deal with that by ordering one in the room and splitting it. -- Jake

Jul 19, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Paris....in August?

Regarding La Grande Cascade -- on the Fork/ la Fourchette, you can book some deals right now. As we just did: 40% off the carte, etc. You may want to take a look. -- Jake

Jul 18, 2014
Jake Dear in France

What foods unavailable in US not to miss in France?

Even more off-topic, but with further information: DCM refers to the Wednesday Civic Center farmers market. -- Jake

Jul 18, 2014
Jake Dear in France
1

Need Help in Provence foodie itinerary!

Hi Robert, I too and am happy to hear your report on Flacons de Sel and L'Auberge du Pere Bise -- we plan to be at both places in a few months, and will report back as well. Are there any dishes that you particularly recommend? -- Jake

Jul 17, 2014
Jake Dear in France

M. H. Bread & Butter in San Anselmo

Salut again DCM, Okay, better luck next time, and there will be a next time. I have to agree that I have never had the impression that the person selling me bread there really knew very much about it. And Sushi Ran -- indeed it is excellent. -- Jake

Jul 17, 2014
Jake Dear in San Francisco Bay Area

M. H. Bread & Butter in San Anselmo

Hi there DCM, I rise in defense of my home town product. The multiple similar loaves we have bought there have never had this problem. Could it simply be that this bread does not transport well in checked baggage cross country? By the way, does bread generally travel well in such conditions? -- Jake

Jul 17, 2014
Jake Dear in San Francisco Bay Area

Need help with Provence itinerary

It is an easy walk along usually very quiet roads and I doubt it will take even 20 minutes. From the restaurant to the beginning of the village is about five minutes stroll down hill, and you may need a flashlight for that part of it. -- Jake

Jul 13, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Jin Saint-Honoré

"Through the magic and hazards of earthly life, sometimes, below-the-top may be more enjoyable than absolute-top." -- That's a beautiful and succinct observation that applies broadly and quite beyond the present context. -- Jake

Jul 07, 2014
Jake Dear in France
4

Lunches, mostly on terraces, in and near the Luberon (Provence), early May 2014: La Terrasse (Goult); Le Galoubet (Menerbes); L’Artegal (Gordes), L’Oustalet (Gigondas); Le Petit Café (Saignon); and TGV picnic, courtesy of the Bonnieux Friday marche

Salut allende, here's a belated thanks for your clarification, and indeed we look forward to our planning -- with help of you and others -- for a possible return soon to Piemonte. -- Jake

Jul 05, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Hailstorm decimates vines across Burgundy

When we visited small cellars there in April, they pointed to the rows of barrels, and commented sadly that normally there would be another row atop; they had lost an entire year's production over the last couple. And now again -- we really feel for them. And obviously it won't be good for consumers, either. -- Jake

Jul 03, 2014
Jake Dear in Wine

Lunches, mostly on terraces, in and near the Luberon (Provence), early May 2014: La Terrasse (Goult); Le Galoubet (Menerbes); L’Artegal (Gordes), L’Oustalet (Gigondas); Le Petit Café (Saignon); and TGV picnic, courtesy of the Bonnieux Friday marche

Concerning mangeur's point of joy: Exhibit A is found here – http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/7812... -- the post that re-ignited our interest in Provence/the Luberon and sparked our recent return. -- Jake

Jul 03, 2014
Jake Dear in France
1

Lunches, mostly on terraces, in and near the Luberon (Provence), early May 2014: La Terrasse (Goult); Le Galoubet (Menerbes); L’Artegal (Gordes), L’Oustalet (Gigondas); Le Petit Café (Saignon); and TGV picnic, courtesy of the Bonnieux Friday marche

Salut Kurtis, Ahhh, so you were on the terrace under that lovely dappled shade, that's what we aim for next time. Our visit day featured threats of showers, and they were not serving outside. -- Jake

Jul 02, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Lunches, mostly on terraces, in and near the Luberon (Provence), early May 2014: La Terrasse (Goult); Le Galoubet (Menerbes); L’Artegal (Gordes), L’Oustalet (Gigondas); Le Petit Café (Saignon); and TGV picnic, courtesy of the Bonnieux Friday marche

Hi allende, First, I appreciate your helpful comments and reviews on the Italy board, and we will put them to use next year when we plan to return to Piemonte.

And I certainly do recall your post from April -- and thinking at the time, that it was one of the most overall positive things I’ve read from you about a restaurant or dining issue in France! But your closing assessment -- “nothing out of the ordinary” – made and still makes me suspect that we have different definitions of that term, or that maybe in some respects we are looking for and appreciating different things.

We, for example, certainly don’t have your admirable experience with Italian dining; but when I read the word “ravioli” in your review, I had a pretty good hunch where the rest of the sentence was going. It actually sounds as if your review would have been quite favorable had you not been subjected to that attempted cross-cuisine dish, and an elderly Epoisse? (You said the setting is extremely comfortable and well done; the service was excellent; the three named savory dishes and desserts were “very good”; and wines, although not what you originally hoped for, were “excellent.” And yet your general assessment was that “the food was good, nothing more,” and the entire experience was just “ordinary.”

This is a long way of saying that when I read your review back in April while deciding whether to keep L’Oustelet on our short list, I read between the lines, reweighed some points, and applied a multiplier. As we are reminded by mangeur, we must calibrate our assessments of others’ recommendations! (With the multiplier, it came out to about 7.256 on the JT scale, pretty darn good.)

About wine: Although I love looking at wine lists, we did not spend long on this one because, after chatting briefly with the sommelier about the Perrin family’s connection with Tablas Creek (in the hills west of Paso Robles, California) and finding him professional, passionate, and personable, we decided to put ourselves in his hands. We later found out that he was generous, too, as described in my OP. (See picture of the seven soldiers from which he poured for each of us over the course of our three+ hours.)

As we’ve all learned, sometimes a dining outing just clicks because the whole experience, influenced by not only what’s on the plates, but numerous intangibles, melds in a harmonious and lovely way. Here, frankly, a major intangible was the sommelier; another was our perfectly-placed window table, affording a view of the entire room and the beautiful terrace. And the food – on our scale, it was very good to exceptionally good (the baby goat dishes). Still, we don’t expect it to be the same if and when we return, hopefully to the terrace; nor do we expect in the meantime that others who might read this and venture to Gigondas will necessarily find the end of the rainbow that we did. But . . . it will likely be quite a while before we think more fondly of a lunch, as I said before, anytime and anywhere.

PS: I belatedly thank Pammel for originally bringing L’Oustelet to our attention. -- Jake

Jun 28, 2014
Jake Dear in France
2

Lunches, mostly on terraces, in and near the Luberon (Provence), early May 2014: La Terrasse (Goult); Le Galoubet (Menerbes); L’Artegal (Gordes), L’Oustalet (Gigondas); Le Petit Café (Saignon); and TGV picnic, courtesy of the Bonnieux Friday marche

OK, I like the crumb collector reference, I'll accept that, you are welcome indeed.

Jun 27, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Lunches, mostly on terraces, in and near the Luberon (Provence), early May 2014: La Terrasse (Goult); Le Galoubet (Menerbes); L’Artegal (Gordes), L’Oustalet (Gigondas); Le Petit Café (Saignon); and TGV picnic, courtesy of the Bonnieux Friday marche

OK Kurtis, uncork the bottle and consume this, in two pictures. And I'll throw in the first two dishes I described as well. Oh, and I completely forgot to mention the amuse-bouche -- lovely ham, and an avocado mousse thing with a cheese crisp -- so I'll throw that in too. Actually, now I recall a second amuse-bouche as well, a little fresh pea soup I think. This lunch just keeps growing and getting better for me! And I'll add a picture of the exterior & terrace under the draped lights. Thanks again for helping to send us there. -- Jake

Jun 27, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Lunches, mostly on terraces, in and near the Luberon (Provence), early May 2014: La Terrasse (Goult); Le Galoubet (Menerbes); L’Artegal (Gordes), L’Oustalet (Gigondas); Le Petit Café (Saignon); and TGV picnic, courtesy of the Bonnieux Friday marche

Mangeur, oh come on, I take inspiration from *you* and so many others! I will admit to extensive researching, which is in my blood anyway and I enjoy. But I'll also say that once the research is done and we've picked good lodgings and are at a location, we become quite free form, often deciding over breakfast what we'll do and where we'll go on any given day -- and just let serendipity take over. (Assisted of course by the Green Michelin and proprietors wherever we may be. Wherever we are in France, there are interesting things we often know nothing about just around the corner or down the street.) Of course we always have a reservation for dinner -- but the rest of each day usually just unfolds as we go along and things happen. So, I'm saying, our style is, research, yes -- but not much scheduling. It's a tour, and not a march, after all! I suppose that you and many others here do about the same, especially in the countryside.

Jun 27, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Lunches, mostly on terraces, in and near the Luberon (Provence), early May 2014: La Terrasse (Goult); Le Galoubet (Menerbes); L’Artegal (Gordes), L’Oustalet (Gigondas); Le Petit Café (Saignon); and TGV picnic, courtesy of the Bonnieux Friday marche

Hi VaPaula, thanks. I post partly in recompense for the great information I've learned on this site, and in part to maybe help encourage a few others to rent a car or take a TGV and venture beyond Paris. And speaking of the trains and picnics ("some seriously jealous fellow passengers"), indeed, on this most recent picnic we were almost embarrassed for the French family sitting across from us, as they dined on very uninspiring Wonder-bread type sandwiches that might have come from the sorry bar on the train. By the time we brought out our dessert course, fresh cherries and chocolates, they were smacking their hands on their foreheads and smiling in friendly mock shame. Train picnics (and the shopping for them) are one of our favorite parts of each trip. -- Jake

Jun 27, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Lunches, mostly on terraces, in and near the Luberon (Provence), early May 2014: La Terrasse (Goult); Le Galoubet (Menerbes); L’Artegal (Gordes), L’Oustalet (Gigondas); Le Petit Café (Saignon); and TGV picnic, courtesy of the Bonnieux Friday marche

Salut boredough, Glad to hear that
la Petite Cave has re-opened, it didn't sound from Andrew that that was in the cards a few weeks ago, when he walked us down from the cafe for a look at the cave. Good for him, you, and others! -- Jake

Jun 27, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Lunches, mostly on terraces, in and near the Luberon (Provence), early May 2014: La Terrasse (Goult); Le Galoubet (Menerbes); L’Artegal (Gordes), L’Oustalet (Gigondas); Le Petit Café (Saignon); and TGV picnic, courtesy of the Bonnieux Friday marche

I’ve posted about local dinners here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/979839. After stopping by the fine Sunday market at Le Coustelet to pick up fruits and other provisions for our rented gite, we drove to Goult, where we had a light lunch upstairs on the terrace at the aptly named Restaurant La Terrace, overlooking the square and with a nice partial view to the north. We were happy to be back in Provence, and celebrated by ordering, albeit out-of-season I think, two truffes noires dishes: one with potatoes, and the other an omelet. Very nice, with a demi of crisp local blanc. After, when we walked around the lovely and quiet little town, partly in order to locate La Bartavelle for our upcoming reservation there, we noticed Restaurant Aux Fines Herbes, which looked to be a good lunch place as well.

Le Galoubet, in Menerbes, was our default choice because we could not get into Maison de la Truffe et du Vin, with its fantastic terrace, but in retrospect (and especially after realizing that truffe season had passed), we are not sorry. There’s a nice planetree shaded terrace area across the street, but cigarette smoke made us opt for one of the sidewalk tables under the awning in front of the little corner restaurant. Standout: Delicate fresh lapin in a light tomato broth with perfect small potatoes; and my wife enjoyed an omelet with greens. We walked off this light lunch, and generated appetite for an excellent dinner at Le Bartavelle, by touring for a couple hours the impressive and slightly spooky medieval “ghost town” hillside village of Oppede-le-Vieux. What a fascinating place that is . . . .

L’Artegal: We arrived in overwhelmed Gordes at 11:00 on Tuesday -- market day. All paid lots were full, and so we finally parked, outside town limits, at least 1 km from the center. After some herb shopping (we saw the same hat guy at multiple markets) we dined on the terrace right off the main square at L’Artegal. Standouts: Braised rabbit with mashed potatoes and olives, and strawberry soup for dessert. After, we drove to and toured the nearby striking and Village Bories, www.gordes.village.com -- very primitive dry-stone (no mortar or binder, etc.) structures (“cabanes,” huts) dating from the 17th century, and used until the mid-19th; and from there, to the 3 B.C. Pont Julien.

L’Oustalet, Place du Village, in charming little Gigondas. We took a drive to Beaumes-de-Venise, Vacqueras, and finally Gigondas, http://www.restaurantoustalet.com/, where we had a 12:30 reservation (we had called the prior day, but they were booked). First, the setting: The lovely shoulder-of-hill village of Gigondas is just about perfect, as its little planetree-shaded square, on one corner of which you find L’Oustalet’s inviting outdoor terrace with substantial wooden tables and chairs under draped lights. It must be magical on a warm evening. Inside is a stylish and elegant restaurant that clearly has been discovered by tourists -- we heard a lot of English, including a table for 7 next to us (2 Brits, 2 Belgians and 2 from the US south, led a British woman guide with a stunningly piercing voice). But even that could detract from the magic of this place. We passed on the 4-and 5 course options, and took the three-course menu (each getting different of two options for each course) with wine pairings, and soon hit it off with the sommelier, a very engaging and kind fellow who have us multiple extra pours and two or three extra wines -- which in turn required us to expend hours walking after lunch, but we usually do that anyway. The menu -- all gradations of super, was: Green asparagus and chives atop a foam and under fresh morilles; turbot “Mousserons, Févettes et Mange-Tout de printemps”; baby goat, two ways: on the rib on a plate -- and parts, including heart, in a roasting pan; local cheeses on slate with wild & fresh greens; and finally, a take on strawberry shortbread, but better, with something like fresh frozen yogurt (or maybe goat-related?) atop. (Looking back, maybe it was, from their web site: “Les Chèvres frais du Barroux en « trois maturitées » frais, crémeux, sec.”) Plus mignardies and coffee. This was, quite simply, one of our most enjoyable and memorable lunches, anywhere and ever. Also, the most expensive lunch of 18 on this trip -- but completely worth it.

After driving into the deep hills and walking to Le Ferme Auberge Castelas, in Sivergues -- we will stay at and dine there some day! -- we drove back toward the valley and returned after many years to Saignon, in time to shop at the small weekly marche. We knew that Auberge du Presbytère had closed, and it was sad to see it so; what a lovely terrace there. The store where we bought liquid lavender to help cure a sore throat years ago is now “Petit Café,” the new establishment of Andrew Paul Goldsby, just up the street from his former restaurant, “La Petit Cave.” We really liked this place, and talking with Andrew. Once again, we sat outside and as usual at lunch we were looking for lightness and freshness. We found it here in spades: Bright cold pea soup with crayfish and peas from his garden (with the liquid poured over at the table; here you could see the influence of his former restaurant); what he called on the carte “assiette super” -- whatever’s fresh from the garden that day (it was roasted beets, lima beens, fennel fronds & assorted greens, and balsamic, with slices of chevre); pork tenderloin with potato gratin; for dessert fresh strawberries with a papaya seed sauce & home made ice cream. He serves all day long.

Finally, the last lunch of our road trip was on the rails at about 300 kmph. We bought cheese, sausage (“Les Saucisson du Père Jack”), and fruits at the marche Bonnieux, a small baguette at the local boulangerie, and after frustrations finding a manned station in Avignon that would accept our antiquated magnetic-strip credit card (when will US banks give us proper chip and pin cards like other civilized countries use?), we gazolled and bid adieu to our trusty Renault Scenic (sorry for those little scratches), and enjoyed one of our favorite things -- a train picnic, followed by a nap.

Once again thanks to all on this board who gave advice and contributed to the enjoyment of this trip. – Jake

Jun 26, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Need help with Provence itinerary

This reminds me that later tonight, when I have some time, I'll post about 5 recent lunches in and around the Luberon -- all with terraces of one sort or another. -- Jake

Jun 26, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Dinners in and around Bonnieux, early May 2014: L’Arome, La Bartavelle, La Ferme de la Huppe, Le Fournil -- and a picnic dinner from Maison Gouin (Coustelet)

Hi Kurtis, thanks, I now recall that fine second quote from my own research on this board.

And that quote reminds us of one of the pleasures of countryside dining. Often — not always, which makes it more special when it occurs — at the end of dinner, as we are leaving, we get (and through experience, sometimes now give) a short and discrete nod and “bonsoir, monsieur’dame” from a fellow diner at an adjoining table. It seems that, after sitting near but not otherwise directly communicating over the course of a few evening hours, these generally reserved fellow diners feel a need to acknowledge the shared experience and existence of others as they stand up and start to depart. We always find it a charming way to wind down a dinner, and now do it ourselves — assuming the necessary eye contact works out just right. But note: This seems to happen much more rarely in Paris, and I’d say even more rarely in hip-ish places (or am I wrong about that?). Anyway, to us it's yet another bonus of countryside dining, and another example of how atmosphere and “feel” of a place contribute to our enjoyment and our desire to return.

So yes, Bartavelle is indeed the type of place where one can get and give the “bonsoir, monsieur’dame” treatment . . . .

— Jake

Jun 25, 2014
Jake Dear in France

St Malo

"[F]ruits de mer ... at L'Ormeau" -- we agree, and enjoyed that, there, last fall.

Jun 22, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Dinners in and around Bonnieux, early May 2014: L’Arome, La Bartavelle, La Ferme de la Huppe, Le Fournil -- and a picnic dinner from Maison Gouin (Coustelet)

Salut Parigi, I am hearing you in stereo! And thanks again for your Maison Gouin recommendation. -- Jake

Jun 22, 2014
Jake Dear in France

Dinners in and around Bonnieux, early May 2014: L’Arome, La Bartavelle, La Ferme de la Huppe, Le Fournil -- and a picnic dinner from Maison Gouin (Coustelet)

I’ll post about area lunches separately. But first, dinners: After a pleasant drive northeast from the Camargue (http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/978703) we arrived at our rented gite (http://www.leclosdubuis.fr/la-gardiole/ -- associated with the local Hotel Clos du Buis), figured out how to use the washing machine (always a challenge) and walked the town for a few hours (including a peek into Domaine La Bastide de Capelongue, where we decided not to dine), working up appetite for our dinner at L’Arome, http://www.laromerestaurant.com/fr/of.... , which can be booked via their web site. The food was very good; the service interfered, however. We were in the front (of 3) rooms, all full (there are also about 16 seats on the raised-stepped sidewalk/terrace outside), and I had a partial view of the kitchen. We were cared for by two nice waiters and the owner, but there was miscommunication between the three of them, and/or the kitchen expeditor. After our apperos (very good, one peach-based, the other cherry-based, can’t recall what they were now?), it took another 40 minutes for the entrees to arrive at 21:00 -- a full hour after we entered. OK, we were in no hurry. But when they finally did arrive, we asked, “pas d'amuse bouche?” We’d seen everyone else get a little cup. “Oh yes,” the she took the entrees back and brought out the little cup of fish soup. Then the entrees returned, at which point we noticed that mine, instead of being the interesting dish of marinated sardines, tomatoes and olives that I’d ordered, was instead raw salmon dish atop lentils. I made eye contact with the owner, who came over apologetically, immediately acknowledging the mistake. For some reason I offered to just keep it (I do like everything, altho this looked a bit boring compared to what I’d ordered), and she thanked me for that, and then had sharp words with the kitchen expeditor. It was good, though not what my taste buds were looking for. Standouts: The plats -- we each ordered two different versions of lamb -- were really excellent, and went very well with a robust Cote du Ventoux rouge. These two dishes were so good in fact that we almost decided to give it another chance and rebook for later that week. But we opted for variety instead . . . .

One of the best dinners of our trip was at La Bartavelle, http://www.bartavelle.free.fr rue de Cheval Blanc, in Goult. (Because of their difficult reservation requirement -- one is asked to call between 9-12 in the morning, not very convenient from California -- Celine, of Hotel du Buis, helpfully reserved for us.) There were two entree and three plat choices. Standouts: After a nice amuse bouche that we recall as ratatouille with, what was it, maybe octopus?, we had an excellent veal dish, “Tartare de veau francais, courgettes, olives de Nyons, condiments”; lovely fish (dorade?), “Poisson sauvage selon arrivage, bouillon de persil plat, radis, bulots,” and stuffed rabbit with foie gras, violet artichokes and estragon -- wow! And there were two excellent breads. Value priced local blanc and rouge from Chateau Les Eydins accompanied all perfectly. From the moment we walked in and met and chatted with Regine Leichel and chef Gerard Lefevre, and throughout the evening, when both would take turns gliding effortlessly through the room, bringing and removing our plates and exchanging a few pleasant words, we felt we were in a warm and special place. (We subsequently learned their names from the distinctive leather faux book/box in which they bring l’addition.) And how lovely to stroll the quiet village late at night after dinner. We tried to book again for three nights later, and they put us on their waiting list, but that didn’t work out, and so we anticipate all the more our return someday.

La Ferme de la Huppe, just outside and below Gordes, http://www.lafermedelahuppe.com/ was very good, and we’d return. Yet anything would suffer in comparison after La Bartavelle, and it didn’t help that the small room was almost empty (only 6 diners total, and two of them left soon we entered) on this midweek night. Standouts: Crayfish soup with fennel; dorade (again!) with a mixed vegetables and basil oils -- super; and, served in separate iron & ceramic pots and left tableside for self-service: braised beef cheeks with olives and potatoes dauphines. Again, with reasonably priced local blanc and rouge. This also looks to be a fine place to stay for a few nights.

Our next dinner, after one of the best and most memorable lunches ever (at L’Oustalet, in Gigondas -- more in the next post), was an evening “picnic” dinner at our gite, courtesy of Maison Gouin, www.lamaisongouin.fr, in Le Coustellet. As its card says, it’s a “Restaurant, Cave a vins, Traiteur, Epicerie, [et] Boucherie BIO.” Thanks to Parigi, whose posts recommending this place I found just that morning on this forum, we knew to stop by there on our drive back home.

Our last dinner before dropping the car at Avignon and taking the TVG back Paris was at Le Fournil, http://www.lefournil-bonnieux.com/lef... , and it was good. The place, our very expressive waiter told us, was indeed formerly a bakery, with an oven -- hence its name. He pointed out the stainless steel ceiling structure in the middle of the room, where the building literally goes into the dug-out natural cave, and where the oven’s vent formerly was -- and where rain still falls though and is diverted into a huge gutter to avoid flooding the modern and somewhat flamboyant dining room. After local apperos (Rinquinquin & Lou Parpaillou), standouts were: Ricotta ravioli with hearts of purple artichoke; pan-fried green asparagus with chicken “oysters” and jus; the fish of that day (pan-seared (dorade yet again?), with more and different asparagus & fresh peas and a very light cream sauce); and perfectly cooked bull sirloin two ways -- braised and grilled. And again we had reasonably priced demis of local blanc and rouge. Very nice, and we can see that it would be lovely to sit on the terrace under old planetree in slightly warmer weather.

Jun 21, 2014
Jake Dear in France
1

Burgundy Restaurants not to be missed

Javi, this is a great report all around, thanks for it. -- Jake

Jun 20, 2014
Jake Dear in France

About Paris, France; Regarding sites like Yelp, Trip Advisor, etc.?

"I often click "French reviews" to place them on top and use the translation option. Plus if I see a place that has three reviews from Americans and 50 in French, that catches my attention." – That is exactly how I use TripAdvisor reviews, both in Paris and out in the countryside. -- Jake

Jun 19, 2014
Jake Dear in France

NYT

And she managed to secure some interesting and provocative quotes, for example from Bertrand Auboyneau. For this and other reasons, I really don't get the harsh criticism by some upthread of an article that, frankly, is probably not intended for the uber-sophisticated Paris diner in the first place.

Jun 19, 2014
Jake Dear in France
2

August Beaune/Paris draft at last!

Quite agree. Our son, at 8-9-10, loved Paris. And Berlin. I *generally* trust parents to know what their own can appreciate and handle, and of course you can take advantage of many kid-friendly activities also available in Paris.

On your A/B issue, as already said both would be good, and we enjoyed both restos just a few weeks ago, but I'd break the tie by opting for Gevrey, just for change of scene. -- Jake

Jun 18, 2014
Jake Dear in France