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MessyVirgo's Profile

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Problems with San Marzano tomatoes in sauce

"Pallet"? Really? Like what those cases of tomatoes are stacked on? The word is "palate." I don't apologize for the sarcasm, because anyone can call themselves "chef." My Italian mother and aunts didn't do anything that elaborate for spaghetti sauce.

Jul 05, 2014
MessyVirgo in Home Cooking
1

Recipe of the Day

Thanks for the replies. I miss Recipe of the Day. It reminded me to check Chow often.

Mar 08, 2014
MessyVirgo in Site Talk

Recipe of the Day

How do I get ROTD? I used to get it in my email. Somehow or another I've unsubscribed from it. How do I get it back. The Settings tab does not address the Recipe of the Day. Only the Boards. How do I get re-subscribed? Thanks

Mar 07, 2014
MessyVirgo in Site Talk

Affordable equipment to maintain constant temperatures?

Since I strain the yogurt of as much whey as I can, I usually wind up with about 5 cups. But yes, I inoculate the milk at about 110˚, and I don't know what temperature it ferments(?), but it comes out tangy and delicious. (OT, how did you get the degree symbol? I just copied yours to put in this reply.)

Sep 13, 2013
MessyVirgo in Cookware

warped baking pans

I also use the ones from Sam's Club. I use them for cookies, roasting vegetables, baking frozen French fries, fresh potato slices, chunks, fish sticks, etc. Most of the time, if the food is fatty enough, I don't grease them or use parchment. For bread I sprinkle corn meal. I think they are still $10 for 2 pans.

Sep 13, 2013
MessyVirgo in Cookware
1

Affordable equipment to maintain constant temperatures?

I fill my slow cooker almost to the top with cold milk -- any kind -- and heat for three hours and 15 minutes. I turn off the pot and let it cool for almost 3 hours, or until it reaches 10 degrees. I then add yogurt from the previous batch (or store bought without any added ingredients) and keep it on a cheap heating pad at medium without an automatic turn-off, then let it sit for 18-24 hours because I like it thick. I refrigerate it until cold and then strain it. (I'm lactose intolerant; the whey contains the lactose.) I've been doing this for about 2 years.

Sep 13, 2013
MessyVirgo in Cookware

Problems with San Marzano tomatoes in sauce

According to several English to Italian web translation sites, gravy translates to sugo. I guess the folks using gravy must have wanted to be more "Americano." My mother's dialect rendered "sugo" as "zugu."

May 08, 2011
MessyVirgo in Home Cooking

Pork and Pâté Vietnamese Sandwich (Banh Mi)

I think I'll just go to the Vietnamese grocery store/deli and buy one. This is too much trouble.

Feb 03, 2011
MessyVirgo in Recipes

Mirin

I live in Oklahoma City. We have a large Vietnamese population and several really good Oriental groceries. I looked for mirin in the liquor stores and can't find it. However, there are many brands of mirin on the shelves in the Oriental grocery stores, but they all have salt and sugar. Is this the only mirin there is? Or is there mirin that is drinkable? What is a good brand, or should I go by the highest price?

Nov 12, 2010
MessyVirgo in General Topics

Would you send it back? [moved from General Topics]

I can't afford to be a "prick." Paying for something that I don't use is a waste of my fixed income. Sending the food back sends a message to the kitchen and wait staff that an order is unacceptable. Of course, it makes it hard on you because your dining companions will have finished maybe, before you even start. However, asking to have the whole table sent back so everyone's food can be eaten at the same time -- that's being a prick. Or asking the manager to comp to unacceptable order and then go hungry, that's cutting off your nose to spite your face.
Send it back.

Nov 12, 2010
MessyVirgo in Not About Food

One Bay Leaf Question

I've lived in Oklahoma for over 40 years and have found fresh bay leaves in the market just once in all that time. When skewering them for spiedinis, we soak the dry leaves in hot, boiling water for about an hour to make them more pliable and flavorful.

Oklahoma City is remote boonies as far as grocery stores and farmers' markets are concerned. It's hard to find certain reasonably-priced vegetables and herbs (I have a brown thumb), and certain varieties and cuts of meat. Of course, fresh fish is very expensive.

Oct 08, 2010
MessyVirgo in Home Cooking

Rice and Lentils at Every Temperature

I found this recipe over 40 years ago, written by Vance Bourjaily in the "Woman's Day Encyclopedia of Cooking." His family topped it with additional fried crispy onions and/or a simple salad (yes, the salad is right on top). The cold and crunchy salad contrasted with the hot and soft texture of the Mjeddrah. He called it "A Pot of Jacob's Guile." It was supposedly the "pottage" that Jacob sold to his twin Esau in exchange for the legacy from his father, Isaac.

Oct 08, 2010
MessyVirgo in Features

Kewpie Mayonnaise's Secret Ingredient

Can't you just make your own Kewpie mayonnaise with rice wine vinegar and some MSG? I make my own mayonnaise all the time. It takes longer to clean the food processor than it does to make the mayonnaise. It's so superior to store-bought -- even Hellman's (Best Foods). If you have eggs, oil and vinegar or lemon juice, try making your own. I've heard a blender will work, also. But don't use a VitaMix because it cooks the egg before it can emulsify. (I speak from sad experience.)

Sep 25, 2010
MessyVirgo in Features

Chicken Fried Steak- Oklahoma City- I'm torn

Ann's is okay. It has a pseudo-Route 66 atmosphere, and it is on the original Route 66. However, the best place in town to get great chicken fry is the Chuck House on 10th and Meridian. You get the cream gravy, biscuits and a tender, HUGE, chicken-fried steak. Very, very casual and not pretentious.

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Chuck House Restaurant
4430 NW 10th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73107

Route 66 Cafe
2204 W College St, Springfield, MO 65806

Jun 02, 2010
MessyVirgo in Great Plains

Oklahoma City Recommendations

There are many -- not lots -- of good places to eat in OKC. I can't afford them, so I cook at home, but I've been to many of them. All of the following are local, not chains. Rococo is an Italian restaurant on NW 28th and Penn. Excellent, somewhat pricey. The Coach House. I've never eaten there because it's very pricey, but also has one or two Michelin(?) stars. Deep Fork Grill. Very, very good. Van's Pig Stand in Norman for barbecue -- see if you can make time to go there. Leo's Barbecue east of downtown. Excellent. Ingrid's for German and deli food; great breads and cold cuts. Earl's Barbecue: there's one in Bricktown and one on North Western north of 63rd. Generally, stay away from Bricktown -- pricey watering holes -- unless that's if what you want. There are many, many Vietnamese restaurant and Mexican restaurants, usually little holes-in-the wall that you find in the ethnic neighborhoods. Japanese food at Sushi Neko and Musashi's across the street from each other on North Western, about 42nd Street. Downtown hotels gave good food -- I've heard. Check them out on the Internet. I think all of these places have websites. If you have any questions, let me know. The BEST food in OKC is at my house, but sorry, I don't have a license. ;-)

Also, check out bigray's suggestions elsewhere in this forum. I forgot about those.

Rosemary

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Deep Fork Grill
5418 N Western Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73118

The Coach House Restaurant
6437 Avondale Drive, Oklahoa City, OK 73116

Sushi Neko
4416 N Western Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73118

Jun 02, 2010
MessyVirgo in Great Plains

Problems with San Marzano tomatoes in sauce

Sorry to get into this so late, but I just joined.
My maternal grandmother was Calabrian and my paternal grandparents were Sicilian and I never heard spaghetti sauce called "gravy." We called it "sugo" with my mother's dialect pronunciation. My parents called gravy that brown stuff thickened with flour -- which they didn't like. I had cooked for 35 years before I married a man from North Carolina and his mother taught me how to make gravy.
We had spaghetti with broccoli and garlic and oil, or cauliflower and garlic and oil, or lentils with garlic and oil, or sometimes with just garlic and oil. My mother also made a sauce for spaghetti with a pork loin roast (in those days they had a bone) and canned tomatoes, or brucelloni (sp) and canned tomatoes.
I grew up in St. Louis in the 40s and 50s.

Jul 27, 2009
MessyVirgo in Home Cooking