r

rarerollingobject's Profile

Title Last Reply

Goma dofu in Tokyo?

Thanks so much to you both! I'm devoting today to finding one, or both!

Nov 12, 2010
rarerollingobject in Japan

Goma dofu in Tokyo?

Have been in Japan for 5 days now, eating amazing sushi, okonomiyaki, takoyaki, toro, tonkotsu ramen, curry rice and all sorts of other amazing things throughout Osaka and Tokyo.

But surprisingly (to me, given I'm a confirmed carnivore/anything involving animal fats lover), the dish that I've been most taken by, most delighted by, was the goma dofu I had in a little ramen shop on Mt Koya and then again in the shojin ryori meal at the temple I stayed in.

The utter unctuous creaminess of this 'dofu' (really coagulated ground sesame seeds) is something I've been dreaming about ever since..anyone know where I could find this in Tokyo? Either restaurant or shop. Doesn't matter where, I have nearly a week here and blissful nothing to do other than eat..

Nov 12, 2010
rarerollingobject in Japan

"Anti-gourmet" grocery stores in SF?

Thanks everyone for your amazing suggestions! I'll take up almost of all them at one point or another, I think.

To rworange: I'm sorry you got that impression. I perhaps didn't make it clear enough that of course I know the main draw in CA is the produce and fresh food. It's the main reason I chose SF for this holiday, the main reason I'm going out to Berkeley Bowl (all those tomato varieties!), the reason I'm getting up at 6am most jetlagged to go to Ferry Plaza Farmer's markets and the reason I've specifically booked accommodation with a kitchen, so I can do some cooking with all the wonderful produce I know I'll find.

But there is an element of 'nostalgia', sort of, that any food obsessed tourist who grew up outside the States has for American junk food..a yearning to try all the things you heard about as a kid in movies, even if you know they are cliches, and not actually representative of real food culture. Just as foodies visiting Australia might be tickled to pick up a jar of Vegemite, or a packet of Tim Tams. ;)

And with all due respect, if I assumed that SFers/Americans do nothing but eat junk food, I wouldn't be feeling the need to ask for specific recommendations as to where to find it, would I? ;)

Thanks again, all!

-----
Berkeley Bowl
2020 Oregon St, Berkeley, CA 94703

Mar 21, 2010
rarerollingobject in San Francisco Bay Area

"Anti-gourmet" grocery stores in SF?

When I travel overseas (from my home in Australia), one of my very favourite activities is devoting large chunks of time to browsing grocery stores (like many Chowhounders also love to do, I suspect!).

For my visit to San Francisco next week, I've already got plans to hit Bi Rite, Boulette's Larder, Berkeley Bowl and a couple of others, but..

I also have a hankering to browse the kinds of products that aren't quite gourmet but quintessentially old school "American" (apologies for the mass generalisation, but you know what I mean..): Twinkies, marshmallow fluff, Shake n Bake, anything with processed cheese, transfat snacks, that kind of thing..and I really want to bring home a couple bags of specialty baking chips like peanut butter or toffee 'chocolate' chips.

So my question is; are there any good mass market consumer supermarkets around either the Union Sq or Noe Valley areas Chowhounds who can appreciate a little junk food lust can recommend?

-----
Berkeley Bowl
2020 Oregon St, Berkeley, CA 94703

Boulettes Larder
Ferry Slip, San Francisco, CA 94111

Mar 19, 2010
rarerollingobject in San Francisco Bay Area

*August 2009 COTM* OTTOLENGHI: Roots, Pulses and Grains, Soups

Good heavens, I just went back and checked the recipe and you entirely right about the absence of preserved lemon, and the presence of nigella seeds and tarragon! I must have completely mentally and physically bastardised the recipe without even realising it..sorry all!

Aug 25, 2009
rarerollingobject in Home Cooking

*August 2009 COTM* OTTOLENGHI: Roots, Pulses and Grains, Soups

I think so; the textures would be different, but a big sprinkle of lemon juice and a little brown sugar would get you closer to the flavour profile of the tomatoes in the original recipe.

And even if it doesn't, I bet it'd be delicious anyway!

Aug 20, 2009
rarerollingobject in Home Cooking

*August 2009 COTM* OTTOLENGHI: Roots, Pulses and Grains, Soups

Couscous and mograbiah with oven-dried tomatoes (p77)

Normally I tend to avoid couscous, as it's quite carby with little fibre (preferring spending my "carbs" on barley etc), but this recipe sounded so full of flavour and sunshine..with an uncharacteristic degree of planning, the night before making this, I scooped a cup of Greek yoghurt into a papertowel-lined sieve set over a bowl and left overnight in the fridge. This drains most of the water out of the yoghurt and effectively turns it into labneh, a fresh Lebanese 'cheese' I often make to eat for breakfast with tomatoes and pita. Labneh IS actually an inclusion in the recipe, despite the title not mentioning it.

The recipe calls for roma tomatoes, but I only had cherry tomatoes, so roasted them anyway with a litle olive oil, molasses sugar (substituted for muscovado), balsamic and sea salt. Then promptly forgot about them so pulled them out way later than intended to find charred tomato nubs, but delicious nonetheless. Set them aside to let them cool down awhile.

I then sauteed two sliced onions in a good slosh of olive oil, for about 15 minutes until dark brown and sticky; not having any mograbiah (large grain couscous variant), I just used extra couscous and steamed it up with boiling vegetable stock and olive oil under cling wrap for 5 minutes.

I then shredded two preserved lemons and stirred them into the fluffed up couscous, tasted and added two fat pinches of salt; piled it onto a platter and sprinkled the onions and their oil, and the tomatoes and their juices over the top. Pinched some rough blobs of labneh over the top and added some unauthorised additions; dried rose petals I had leftover from something else and a big handful of chopped mint.

Results very satisfying; the crumbly couscous marrying really well with the creaminess of the yoghurt, the caramelly umami of the onions and tomatoes, and the zing of the salty preserved lemon. Overall, it was delicious, nourishing, not too stressful and for a totally vegetarian dish, even my baconarian boyfriend liked it.

Aug 20, 2009
rarerollingobject in Home Cooking

Advice for Sydney

I would also check out these Sydney foodblogs for some great suggestions by location and cuisine:

http://grabyourfork.blogspot.com

http://www.notquitenigella.com

Jul 25, 2009
rarerollingobject in Australia/New Zealand

Anything from the US you consider a real treat?

If they like to bake..peanut butter or butterscotch chips, like chocolate chips..I was gobsmacked by these in American supermarkets and brought 4 bags back to Sydney to hoard jealously for cookies etc.

Other than that, agree about the hot sauce..Frank's etc. They might also be intrigued by peanut butter and jelly, Fluff marshmallow spread and so on.

And forgive me for saying it, but I would skip chocolate anything..American chocolate (Hershey's etc) is generally considered pretty terrible compared to even Cadbury's..no offense intended! :)

Jul 13, 2009
rarerollingobject in Australia/New Zealand

Sushi in Sydney

Agree with Makoto, Yoshii and Azuma but my personal favourite is Tsukasa in East Sydney. Really fresh, generous servings and a great atmosphere. Yoshii and Azuma are more elegant and high end but Tsukasa is better value for money, IMO.

Jul 04, 2009
rarerollingobject in Australia/New Zealand