johnseberg's Profile

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Why coconut oil?

I wanted to believe in oil pulling. The articles I've read, placing it in a favorable light, do not cite studies. And an article dismissing its efficacy mentioned the absence of any studies.

I still think it could be worthwhile, but, very difficult to justify adding the 20 minute exercise to my daily routine. Here is the point of view of one dentist who seems relatively open-minded. The oil pulling question is asked / answered in the comments after the article.

http://southasianhealthsolution.org/o...

I also get [some] coconut oil from Trader Joes. It's $1 cheaper than the store brand of my local "natural" market (Sprouts). I like the taste of Sprouts' product a little better, and find all brands to taste a little different. So, if you don't like one brand - try another. Trader Joes also wins for best reusable jar.

about 8 hours ago
johnseberg in Special Diets

Why coconut oil?

Well, your test came out a little better than mine. It's still a single data point of an imperfect test. I wish I had more to add. My best answer to your question is in my prior post.

I'm not freaking out. I'm going to be a little more careful, and research small steps to improve insulin sensitivity. So far, I finding the usual things - diet, exercise, stress management.

If you're worried, maybe you could get a glucometer or possibly order a fructosamine test.

1 day ago
johnseberg in Special Diets

Dining near Cardinals Stadium

Good answer. OP - search this board for 'forno' to find several similar threads.

1 day ago
johnseberg in Phoenix

Why coconut oil?

My A1c came in at 5.7. I consider it a yellow flag - cause for dusting off the glucometer, and buying some supplies to see how my A1c corresponds to *reality*. My fbg has always been in the 70's.

I tend to eat low carb the majority of the time, and have some carb benders. I think those benders can be particularly damaging, because I am not adapted to metabolizing carbs. Any symptoms I may attribute to damage by glycation have decreased since I've been low carb.

I'm not going to stop eating berries, yet, but, I might increase the coconut milk ratio, and eat them with the protein meal, instead of a snack.

I've done very little with my glucometer. I noticed I could get my bg up over 200 (1 hour), eating a lot of pure starch - no protein or fat. But, it comes right down, 2 hour reading looks good. Again, that's not how I typically eat, and I am adapted to burning fat, so, no big surprise that I'm not handling a one-off bolus of carbs well.

1 day ago
johnseberg in Special Diets

Looking for good eats near Scottsdale's Hotel Valley Ho in September

Grazie is very close. I have preferred it over Grimaldi's, but, I guess it depends on what style of pizza you like.

Jul 29, 2014
johnseberg in Phoenix

Back on the diabetic diet - have to be really strict for now

Jul 28, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets

Low carber avoiding restaurants

I've been going to restaurants quite a bit, lately, because I'm really tired of doing dishes, and missing the social aspect.

I go to places I had sworn off many years ago, such as Outback and Ruby Tuesday. It's easy to get simple meat and veggie dinners at either, even if they're nothing special. I try to prevent the bread from ever coming to the table.

I don't feel cheated at all (sorry ;^) ). In fact, I'm more patient waiting for food, now that I'm not in need of a carb fix. I used to get pretty upset when I was expecting my food, and running into delays.

I wish I had the budget to explore some places serving classic gourmet cuisine. I can handle a little flour in a fatty sauce, and I'm sure they'd accommodate a request for no starch. These might be good places to check out some organ meats that are particularly nutrient dense.

Jul 27, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets

Re-seasoning my cast iron - HELP!

In hindsight, I don't know what I'm talking about regarding the use of a saturated fat for this application. It seems like the desired effect involves some sort of polymer formation. I don't know what would work best. I'm pretty sure I've used some cheap crap in the past, and got decent enough results.

Jul 27, 2014
johnseberg in Cookware

Re-seasoning my cast iron - HELP!

I think this is a good blog post. The methods agree with what some have posted:

http://nomnompaleo.com/post/247981157...

I would rank ghee, refined coconut oil, and beef tallow before lard. You want to use a heat-stable, saturated fat.

Jul 27, 2014
johnseberg in Cookware

Chewing versus Milling whole grains

I was reading the blog of Art Ayers, and thought of this thread. Dr. Ayers latest post: Dr. Oz Five Food Felons.

http://coolinginflammation.blogspot.c...

From the post:

Grains are not healthy for most people, because of the toxicity of gluten and hyperglycemic starch. Ultra fine milling and fast commercial bread making eliminate the resistant starch. "Whole grain" processed foods just add back the insoluble fiber that is considered toxic, because of its phytic acid content. Grains should just be replaced with whole foods, such as vegetables that contain the soluble fiber that feeds the gut flora that provide all of the needed vitamins and are required for immune system development.

Jul 25, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets

Looking for good eats near Scottsdale's Hotel Valley Ho in September

My first thought is that it is the wrong neighborhood for the food you seek. But, I have to admit that I am becoming ignorant of the subject. Take a look at http://phxfoodnerds.com for what many Chowhounds of the past are currently saying. It also has a helpful map that links to discussions. The map seems positioned right on that area, if you just zoom in.

Jul 24, 2014
johnseberg in Phoenix

Why coconut oil?

The Paleo lifestyle is often intended to combat diseases of modern civilization, thought to have their roots in inflammation, blood sugar metabolism, intestinal permeability, toxicity, etc.

Oils high in omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids are commonly associated with inflammation, so, anytime you can replace them with a saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, or omega-3, that's a win. Omega-6 fats are technically essential, but, they're easy to get without any special effort - better to use something like coconut oil when given the choice.

Coconut oil is comprised of a lot of medium chained triglycerides (MCT) which can be easily converted by the body into ketones for energy. Ketones can be as good, or better, as an energy source for most bodily functions. Ketones can even be produced in the presence of moderate amounts of glucose if the MCT intake is high enough.

Parasites can often be a factor in intestinal permeability, and they can be weakened by feeding them MCT. Coconut derivatives are often used for treatment (I am not a doctor).

Refined coconut oil is suitable for cooking at high temperatures without creating a lot of toxic byproducts.

Personally, I am using animal fats for higher temperature applications, but, I don't cook anything really hot anymore. I never heat olive oil, and don't use many other vegetable oils at all. I have some red palm oil, nut butters, tahini, and that's about it. I have more beef tallow than I can use, and it comes from a clean, grass-fed source. I don't keep *refined* coconut oil in the house.

Virgin coconut oil is to be used cold or with gentle heat. I'm not afraid to use it to bake vegetables, but, I wouldn't get up to roasting temperatures.

Sometimes I make some fat snacks that are mostly coconut oil with a little butter (ghee) and almond butter.

I am also of Northern European heritage, and I think it is significant when considering my genetic makeup. I don't give it a lot of weight, though. It's a small piece of a much bigger picture.

Edit: I should add that I eat a fair amount of coconut fat in the form of coconut milk. With berries, it serves as my ice cream substitute. The berries have plenty of sugar, for my taste, and the fat slows down the digestion. I have good blood glucose regulation (allegedly). I just had an A1C test, yesterday, so, we'll see what that says. Doctors have never indicated any sign of a problem, but, I'm not finding much comfort in that, these days.

Jul 23, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets
3

Mock mashed potatoes

Your point on carb cravings is very good. I can't blame you for dismissing research funded by National Starch and scattered anecdotal evidence.

Going against conventional advice, this guy controlled his blood glucose with a very low carb diet, without medication. Crazy, huh? I guess this is the type of person that would experiment on himself with raw potato starch. He blogs about it, here:

http://www.diabetes-warrior.net/2014/...

Jul 20, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets

Dreamfields Pasta for a diabetic, are their low carb claims a hoax?

I heard the excess settlement funds of the class action will be donated to the American Diabetes Association. Maybe they'll use the money to denounce low-carb eating?

Jul 18, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets

High Produce Paleo

Given the clinical meaning of the word "essential" the answer might very well be "no".

There are many examples of healthy people on very low carb diets that don't seem to have any digestive issues, or, maybe they just don't talk about them. Certainly, prebiotic fiber and resistant starch in your diet have an influence on the composition of your gut bacteria which is thought to be favorable. Good science in this area is flooding in, but, I think we know very little, at this point. Personally, I think the need for insoluble fiber has been overstated.

Edit: I should add that even very low carb and ketogenic diets can have more fiber than the SAD. For example, the Wahl's Paleo Plus is six cups of non-starchy vegetables per day. Still, the percentage of calories from carbohydrate is very low.

Jul 14, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets

Obama cuts the line at Franklin BBQ in Austin

Do you really want to know? Just enjoy the BBQ. Brisket that doesn't need sauce is probably as healthy as BBQ gets, and I give it a plus (FWIW).

Jul 13, 2014
johnseberg in Food Media & News
1

High Produce Paleo

I am a recovering cookbook collector. I think I've donated them all to Goodwill, and get recipes from the internet, now. Not that there is anything wrong with them, I'm just not positioned to recommend any. I wish I had held on to my NYT cookbook (Claiborne), because I'd be willing to bet it has a high proportion of Paleo adaptable recipes for vegetables and fruit.

I believe there is a bit of a myth that the Paleo diet is exclusively a meat heavy diet. There is no official Paleo diet. The concept is based on emulating hunter gatherer populations that were relatively free of disease (blah, blah blah). The point being that protein came largely from animal sources, but, the macronutrient ratios were all over the map.

I was listening to a podcast, today, and I thought of this thread. In the podcast, a study was cited, authored in part by Loren Cordain, stating a worldwide average Paleo macronutrient ratio of 22% fat, 37% protein, and 41% carbohydrate. I thought this was interesting, because, in my mind, that is quite low fat. In contrast the podcaster mentioned the "Perfect Health Diet" where the ratios are 65% fat, 15% protein, and 20% carbohydrate.

The point being that Cordain and the Jaminets offer "Paleo" recipes in books, yet they've come to different conclusions, by different methods.

The meat-heavy myth is probably pretty easy to support. The word got out that the Paleo philosophy exonerated animal protein, and meat lovers jumped on the bandwagon. Add to that, a lot of first-time authors of cookbooks where the publishers pressure them to include the word "Paleo" and the phrase "lose weight", and meanings are further skewed.

The podcast to which I'm referring is "Latest in Paleo 114: Just Shocking" by Angelo Coppola. The segment on protein begins at the 24 minute mark. It can be found here:
http://www.latestinpaleo.com/paleo-po...

Jul 12, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets
1

Liquids Only Forever

Search this board for "jaw" for past suggestions to those facing a liquid diet. At the time of this writing, the search function can be found at the upper right of the page.

Jul 03, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets

carba nada noodle question

Yeah, food poisoning suggests a pathogenic infection. I don't think this is very likely to come from a dry product that is prepared by boiling for a few minutes. I believe the most likely cause is a vegetable consumed raw. But, some pathogens are pretty resilient, and I suppose they could come from almost anywhere.

FWIW, I'm leaning more toward this product containing RS4 type resistant starch, because, I think RS2 would become digestible during processing and cooking. RS2 must be consumed raw to remain resistant to digestion. It breaks up at a pretty low temperature, like 120-130 deg F.

Jun 27, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets

carba nada noodle question

I looked at one of their products and noticed it contained "digestive resistant cornstarch". Resistant starch is a powerful prebiotic which will result in digestive issues for many people that are not adapted to it. The main symptom is gas, which can be painful.

There is a form of naturally occurring resistant cornstarch, but, I'd be afraid such a product would have the man-made variety. The rules for the "natural" label are a joke. They probably used "High Maize" or similar, but, I'm speculating. I assume the worst for lack of better labelling regulations.

Adapting your gut to resistant starch can have some very nice benefits, the main one being production of butyric acid in your colon. Colons love this stuff, and similar short-chained fatty acids (SCFAs), however, they tend to get digested before they reach your colon. But, when you eat resistant starch, the SCFAs are produced by bacteria in your colon. The benefits reportedly include immune regulation, and blunting of blood sugar spikes.

The product likely contains RS2 or RS4 resistant starch, or both. You can become adapted to eating these by introducing them in very small amounts, and increasing over time. It may take patience. It can be thought of as a fiber supplement.

I haven't tested the blood sugar blunting claim, myself, but, I certainly experienced an increase in gas when experimenting with RS2 and RS3 resistant starches. My gut bacteria seemed to adapt rather quickly, and I can eat a fair amount without noticing an increase in gas.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/892245

Jun 27, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets
1

WOW Cookies--gf spectacular!

For those curious about ingredients, nutritional facts, etc.:
http://www.wowbaking.com

Jun 27, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets

Whole Foods gets "whacked" for fraud

Right, close enough. It's bad enough I read such an insignificant story once.

Jun 26, 2014
johnseberg in Food Media & News

Doner Kebab in AZ?

I'm not familiar, but, the thought of greasy lamb has me salivating. I prepared some locally raised lamb shanks for the holidays, last year, and they turned out great. It was just a simple rosemary dominant herb prep in a slow cooker with red wine - really easy. The marrow was incredible.

I believe I used the following recipe as a template:
http://www.food.com/recipe/braised-la...

May 24, 2014
johnseberg in Phoenix

Bountiful Baskets, CSA or similar?

I just got a share from Blue Sky Organic Farms. It works for my current purposes. It's strictly organic produce, so, not cheap, but, good, interesting stuff, if you appreciate it.

http://blueskyorganicfarms.com/

The website has links for the CSA info, and also the blog tends to keep up to date on what the share contains, week to week.

Drop-offs are at the Scottsdale Farmers Market and a couple of other locations close to the farm in Litchfield Park.

May 19, 2014
johnseberg in Phoenix

What's in Supplements?

Here are some example scenarios where a person might be concerned with supplement contents.

Personally, I look at the ingredients of everything I ingest (unless I forget). But, I am aggressively avoiding certain things, due to unresolved health issues. Maybe when my issues are resolved, I'll stop looking, but, I think it's a good habit, as I've noticed a lot of "crap" creeping into products that have been historically "clean".

Here is a quote from Dr. William Davis' wheatbellyblog.com:

"The celiac population, of course, respond to microgram quantities of gliadin/gluten. Most of us require milligram quantities to react if we are not celiac or gluten-sensitive. For instance, from a wheat germ agglutinin standpoint, the average person takes in 10-20 mg per day."

Chris Kresser is someone who often blogs about additives. He's pretty good about citing reference material. For example:

http://chriskresser.com/harmful-or-ha...

I actually asked Jarrow from what their magnesium stearate was derived when I was advised to avoid a certain food. At that time, they said it came from palm oil, and they answered very promptly.

Finally, here is an informational document intended to help people who might be suffering from SIBO (Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth).

http://www.siboinfo.com/uploads/5/4/8...

Be aware that formulas change, and you might need to check the container of repeat purchases. I vaguely remember a supplement changing from olive oil to soybean oil. Really, not a huge deal (much < 1 gram), but, the idea that they would make that change was enough to make me re-evaluate, and purchase a different product.

I'll also add that I am getting away from supplements in favor of real food. That's a whole 'nother topic, but, I like the case made by Dr. Terry Wahls.

May 14, 2014
johnseberg in Special Diets

New Movie: "Fed Up"

I was mistaken. This movie is scheduled to show 5x per day, for at least one week (Harkins Camelview 5, Scottsdale, AZ).

May 14, 2014
johnseberg in Food Media & News

New Movie: "Fed Up"

I have heard from British friends about the extra sweetness in the USA.

I eliminated sugar and processed foods from my diet for a few weeks, and things like sweet potatoes and winter squash started tasting much sweeter to me. Certain sweet potatoes were almost too sweet.

Now, despite eating a ton of fat, I can't gain weight!

May 13, 2014
johnseberg in Food Media & News

New Movie: "Fed Up"

I remember those old Dannon commercials.

I also remember "Thanks for ruining my daddy's business, you fat f___." (seinfeld reference)

May 13, 2014
johnseberg in Food Media & News

New Movie: "Fed Up"

I think yogurt could be a great example of a good food gone bad.

I speculate yogurt, prior to homogenization and pasteurization was a richly nutritious food, perhaps some of the most nutritious fat in human food history.

Fast forward to the misguided low-fat American diet of the 1970's - the fat is removed, *and* all those fat-soluble vitamins along with it. The stuff takes a big drop in palatability, so, sugar and flavorings are added. Brand X, with carrageenan, out-sells Brand Y, so, Brand Y adds carrageenan, too. And so on.

I think that if you go to a grocery (even a "health food") store, and calculate what percentage of the choices are full fat, plain, no sugar added yogurt, you'll get a single digit answer.

I went to Whole Foods, yesterday, a rare splurge. There was a person giving samples of "grass-fed" yogurt. I asked if she had a full fat choice. The answer was "no". Incredible. IMO, the whole point of using grass-fed milk is to get a more nutritious fat, the best fatty acid profile, and the best fat soluble vitamin content. "Grass-fed" and "low-fat" just don't belong together, but, they serve as effective marketing buzz words, even at Whole Foods, where the customers are supposed to be a little smarter. Sad.

May 13, 2014
johnseberg in Food Media & News

New Movie: "Fed Up"

HaHa, I've been operating on the idea that the fruit and veggies supplied all the carbs I need for the past year+. I forget about all those other carbs. I'm still not 100% happy with my health, so, maybe I need more.

Good catch.

May 12, 2014
johnseberg in Food Media & News