BuckyE's Profile

Title Last Reply

Menus in English? Is there an app for that?

Sorry to have found this so late, but, for historical purposes and in case anyone else reads this...

Our friends Dana facaros and Michael Pauls of Cadogan Guide fame have just in the last few minths published their "Italian Menu Decoder." Search for it in iTunes!

6,000 entries; their usual impeccable collection of facts so basic **and** obscure you'll be rolling in it. Hundreds and hunderds of fun photos. (It so beats the PDF glossary I compiled with the Slow Travellers' help!)

Note it's not **exactly** just a "menu" glossary. It's that, but contains all kinds of food facts that are both fundamental to and way beyond menus per se: where things come from, their history, all kinds of stuff.

The app works very well; has categories, etc. On your iPhone/iPad, offline.

Hello, Maureen!

Yours,
Bucky Edgett

Jul 28, 2013
BuckyE in Italy

Old-time traditional cuisine in the Languedoc

Thank you Parigi, great idea. Any particular dishes we should look for? Indigenous to the Languedoc?

Jul 19, 2013
BuckyE in France

Favorite Vintage and Off-Beat Soda Pops

Yes, Vernor's! It has some pretty good distribution now, but only in cans. Not as good as the old time Detroit bottles.

Jul 19, 2013
BuckyE in General Topics

Mother's Magic: What Can You Never Make as Well as Your Mom Did?

Nothing.

Sadly, our late mother was a terrible cook. Even she admitted it. She just wasn't interested in food as an aesthetic experience.

Except for Holiday Turkey Dinners. And those we learned to do just as well if not better by gradually taking over, under her supervision, as she aged. She was happy we did, and proud of having two sons beavering away in the kitchen.

Well, no, upon reflection, maybe a few of her Christmas cookies. But some of them we've bettered so successfully it still makes us cry and laugh at the same time, remembering how long and hard she fought some of those recipes year after year.

After almost ten years, she's still sorely missed, and many people are carrying on fine traditions in her memory. But the food's a lot better.

Jul 18, 2013
BuckyE in General Topics
1

Old-time traditional cuisine in the Languedoc

Dear Experts,

We'll be in the Languedoc (outside Carcassone) in late April/early May next year (2014). I'm searching this board and finding good recommendations! Thank you all.

My particular concern for this post is truly old-time, traditional regional specialties and where to try them. It's definitely a sub-category, and perhaps not everyone's mania. But it is mine!

Blanquette méthode ancestrale with pebradou; cassoulet; we know about. But the best of? And what else do I need to seek out?

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.

Jul 18, 2013
BuckyE in France

Lobster and oysters

Thanks to you both. We're still discussing when we might be able to go to Maine, but I'll make sure we go in either late fall or early spring, right? Both of those would be ovelapping seasons?

Jul 17, 2013
BuckyE in Northern New England

Lobster and oysters

This is both a general and a very specific request.

1. Specific: Is anyone familiar with the Damariscotta River's Belon oysters? I want to go north and have some. But I've read they are getting rare. Is that true?

2. General: I think oystering is fall and spring? Are lobsters only summer? Are there times we could get both, local, fresh, etc. In other words, do the seasons for them overlap?

Jul 06, 2013
BuckyE in Northern New England

Vaux le Vicomte candlelight supper

OK, back from our trip and here's the report. Spoiler: disappointing, at least. But fun.

THE SUPPER

1. The supper is not served on the terrace, as the web site photos imply. It is now served in a purpose built covered pavilion at the end of a little lane at the chateau end of the garden. If you get a table near the front, you can sort of see the beginning of the garden, but none of the chateau. So no view of the candles, really.

2. We didn't realise it would still be so light at 8:00 pm in July. The outdoor candles we could see were barely noticeable during and for a while after supper!

3. Medium quality restaurant food. Obviously, given the speed with which it was served, mostly pre-prepared. I've just looked at the online menu and rats, I think our menu was somewhat different, so without notes, I can't now remember exactly what we had. But trust me, not worth going out of your way to have as a nice dinner.

However...

THE EXPERIENCE

Our entry ticket for the candlelight visit allowed us to enter at 14:00 (2 pm, right?). So we made a day of it, and the day should have been longer! I had no idea how far away the end of the gardens are from the chateau. It would be an hour's walk, at least, given that one also has to detour around the Canal.

And it is only from the very end of the garden, on the hill of the Hercules statue, that one can really see the whole affair. The gardens are a series of terraces, getting LOWER as you go out. You have to go up on the hill to see all the terraces at once. Interesting. We could have rented one of the little electric golf carts and gotten out there, but by the time we rode the train from Paris, got the bus, looked through the chateau in daylight to be able to compare to the candlelight, and THEN walked through the gardens down as far as the canal and Cascade Fountain, while the fountains played, oops, time to go back to supper!

And then retour the chateau in candlelight after supper.

Loie and I enjoyed our day there immensely. Having the sit down supper was actually just the thing to help make it a full, rich day. If we had realized the extent of the gardens, we would have arrived earlier, at the stroke of 2:00 pm. Had thorough touring, eaten a nice --but not spectacular-- supper, and done the candlelight walking reasonably well fed.

I'll be happy to answer any questions about the actual meal, after looking over our pictures. And any other questions!

Aug 03, 2012
BuckyE in France

Lot & Dordogne

Ah, I'm sorry! I see that "Martel, Lacave, Marcilhac sur Célé" are indeed in the Lot DEPARTMENT, although they are on or near the Dordogne RIVER. That's my confusion! As we'll be staying in Puy L'Eveque, west of Cahors, I guess although places like that are in our Department, they're also kind of far afield to pop out to for dinner. But maybe we need to plan a few day trips up there to see the countryside!

Thank you Parigi.

Jul 09, 2012
BuckyE in France

Lot & Dordogne

Ok, I've been scouring the board and found an interesting phenomenon. There is little or nothing here about places in the Lot Valley. Plenty of Dordogne and north (Perigordian, I think) but nothing Quercy, until down in Toulouse or so. If that is indeed stil Quercy. Apparently the Lot and Tarn are the orphans of Chowhound gastronomical knowledge!

Or maybe I'm missing something!

Off to the UK and France on Wednesday. Thanks to all who have posted.

Jul 08, 2012
BuckyE in France

Lot & Dordogne

Thank you all. I'm compiling!

Jun 21, 2012
BuckyE in France

Vaux le Vicomte candlelight supper

Thank you, Sunshine, for that tip. We'll keep in mind to avail ourselves of taxi. Now, let's just hope for "Sunshine" on our day!

Jun 21, 2012
BuckyE in France

Lot & Dordogne

We'll be a week in Puy L'Eveque (west of Cahors) this July. Soon!

I'm winkling a few recommendations out of other threads here, but wonder if any Hounds would have time to make a sort of Formal List here? We'd like to hear about both sitdown lunch and dinners, and picnic supplies. Any recommendations or warnings greatly appreciated!

Bucky Edgett

Jun 13, 2012
BuckyE in France

Vaux le Vicomte candlelight supper

Well, thanks to all who responded. We'll not have a car in Paris. I think during our trip time (July) the chateau runs shuttle buses to the train. So we'll be kind of "stuck at" the chateau once we get there. So lemarais, we're hoping this all works out!

I've booked us two seats for dinner, hoping for the best, and willing to accept less just because it's such a silly idea. One thing that decided us is that on that Saturday, the fountains will be operating in the late afternoon. If there's been enough rain to fill the chateau reservoir! Yikes! And, a candlelight visit entry ticket can be used from 2:00 pm on to enter the grounds & chateau.

So we can wander the gardens in the afternoon, have a dinner while the candles are being lighted, and tour the chateau by candlelight after dinner. Hope that works!

Jun 13, 2012
BuckyE in France

Food Lover's Guide to Baltimore

This may be a stretch, but I think Bud's at Silver Run ( http://www.budsatsilverrun.com/ ) is still open. They were French/American style when we last went. Worth a look, I'd say.

Jun 12, 2012
BuckyE in Washington DC & Baltimore

Food Lover's Guide to Baltimore

Goldberg's are the same as all the modern bagels: fluffy, almost no crust and not nearly salty enough. Bland as white bread. Matter of fact, they ARE white bread. But so are everyone else's. Real bagels seem to be a thing of the past. ::sigh::

Jun 12, 2012
BuckyE in Washington DC & Baltimore

Food Lover's Guide to Baltimore

Well, I haven't been there in some years/decades, but sorry, in its hayday, the Cozy was nothing like a "hospital cafeteria." The butter, salt and chicken fat would have sent any self respecting cafeteria manager into fibrillation. And not from actually eating, just thinking about it. I remember it as described by Querencia: a mix of Pennsylvania Dutch and Maryland style home cooking on a huge scale. Has it become modernly health conscious? That would be a shame.

Jun 12, 2012
BuckyE in Washington DC & Baltimore

Basic Steamed Blue Crabs

Excellent step-by-step. Just one more caveat. When first opening the shell, there may be apparent some slimy yellowish stuff in the center of the body. THIS is the "butter." The butter is not the ropey-little-tubes viscera. Some people love to scoop the butter with a finger and eat it; some people despise it. I like it, it's sweet. Crab butter is variously claimed to be fat, and roe. Don't know myself, but it's good!

Jun 07, 2012
BuckyE in Recipes

Old fashioned chewy dense bagels in Baltimore?

Are there any? Goldberg's, although nice, are not what I'm looking for. Old fashioned bagels, as in: chewy, you could hardly bite them apart. Dense, not fluffy. Thicker crust, more crunchy.

All the bagels just seem weak and uninteresting. May be a wild goose chase!

Thanks!
Bucky Edgett

May 06, 2012
BuckyE in Washington DC & Baltimore

What are/were "aloes"?

Dear JMF,

I'm corresponding with some folks who might be able to provide contemporary documentation on "aloes," which they claim were indeed the aloes-wood, as you claim. Neato!

Would you care to share your documentation with us, or is it a secret?

Yours,
Bucky

May 04, 2012
BuckyE in General Topics

What Food Trend are You So Sick Of?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucNYLs...

Douglas Adams' take on an at least similar idea, from "The Restaurant at the End of the Universe," copyright 1980.

May 01, 2012
BuckyE in General Topics
1

What Food Trend are You So Sick Of?

Is macaroni & cheese a trend? Interesting.

The gluey problem comes, I think, from most people using a milk or cream sauce in it. That's a mistake. But it, by association with a bisque, probably suggests the lobster.

See http://lovebunnies.luckypro.biz/01_st... for a good recipe. Use a heavy baking dish/casserole to get the bottom crust. No thin aluminum foil things! A pan of this at the pot luck never goes begging.

May 01, 2012
BuckyE in General Topics

What are/were "aloes"?

Dear JMF,

Short answer: as yet no actual reference to pods being used. I'm out of my depth here!
Picture of a seed pod of A. hirta"
https://sites.google.com/a/gaharu.biz...
A mention of the "little tents" seed pods of some kind of "aloe/agar-wood" species without a species ID:
http://aromatherapy.homestead.com/Spi...
This text is cribbed on several different sites, without any elucidation or references.

Post's list of ingredients isn't exactly the same as Scott's. Post omits orange rind and coffe beans, and substitutes granulated for lump sugar. Their descriptions of the making differ slightly.
But you're right, "aloes" is common to both. Intriguing!

I'm pretty much stumped. The Internet is letting me down! I think we need someone down at Tulane with access to period original source documents to research exactly what "aloes" would have been.

May 01, 2012
BuckyE in General Topics

What are/were "aloes"?

Ha ha! I may be on to something. Beginning to suspect JMF and I are correct, AND incorrect. This is a tangled web, but a certain strand may be emerging.

Aquilaria malaccensis is the tree whose fungus-infected heartwood produces the incredibly expensive and now technically illegal Oud resin perfume. The tree is known colloquially as Agarwood, Aloewood, Eaglewood and Lign-aloes.

However, there is ANOTHER tree, Aquilaria agallocha which is ALSO called Lign-aloes. It is much more common. It has seed pods that are supposedly fragrant.

So I'm wondering if the much less expensive pods of the latter were once sold as spice? THAT would explian the reference to "4" of them. Hmmm?

Apr 29, 2012
BuckyE in General Topics

What are/were "aloes"?

Sloe gin? Are the berries only for color? Don't think I've ever tried sloe gin!

Emily Post's column lists aloes, as well. Difficult to believe two people would have had the same mistake, unless of course she or someone was copying Natalie Scott without really knowing what was being described.

Okay, we need some deeper research into "aloes" in old time recipes. I'm not coming up with much!

Apr 29, 2012
BuckyE in General Topics

Vaux le Vicomte candlelight supper

Loie and I are intrigued by the idea. Does anyone know if the food is good? Thanks!

Apr 29, 2012
BuckyE in France

What are/were "aloes"?

Dear Wyogal,

I've only posted it once. But a thread with an association of sloes and coffee would be interesting!

Apr 28, 2012
BuckyE in General Topics

What are/were "aloes"?

Dear JMF,

Yes, thanks, I read about the aloe incense. ..."myrhh and aloes..." is a Biblical quotation; came up in thousands of hits during my Google searching.

But it can't be the solution to my mystery. Natalie Scott's recipe specifically calls for "4 aloes." Not 4 drops of aloe, or 4 somethings of aloe, just "4 aloes."

Many of her and Mandy's recipes are a bit lax on quantities. Some of them are positively sloppy! So if Ms. Scott specified 4 of something, that something has to have been something that comes as discreet items. Sloes are berries, of which one could obtain 4. The aloewood spice might have come in discreet units or pieces or items or nuggets. But really, "4 sloes" just makes so much more sense as a measure than does "4 aloe(wood)s."

I'm looking for sloes! Thanks again.

Apr 28, 2012
BuckyE in General Topics

What are/were "aloes"?

Drongo, you're a genius! Sloe Gin Fizz is a signature New Orleans cocktail. The original recipe MUST have called for sloes. Yes! Chowhound comes through again. It doesn't seem that Google has digitized any early editions of either Mandy or 200 Years, and at $50 bucks used I have to pass. So no way at the moment to check when the mistake occured.

But I'm sure you've cracked the case. Thanks Immensely!

Apr 28, 2012
BuckyE in General Topics

What are/were "aloes"?

I'm pretty sue I'm NOT talking about aloe vera.

Natalie Scott's <i>200 Years of New Orleans Cooking</i> has a recipe for Cafe Brulot that calls for 4 aloes:
"...
4 all-spice
2 cloves
8 lumps of sugar
6 parched whole coffee beans
4 aloes
..."

It seems they should be some kind of spice/flavoring/I have no idea. I've googled to no avail. It might be possible she was talking about chunks or leaves of aloe vera, but that just doesn't seem likely to me.

Any thoughts on this obscure topic would be greatly appreciated!

Bucky Edgett

Apr 28, 2012
BuckyE in General Topics