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Stone in Berlin

I'm not sure which of Stone's beers would be in violation. The only ones I can think of offhand are the ones with some spicing added, but that is only a couple of special releases - otherwise their beers are in compliance. Given Freigeist's stuff, and also gose, I wouldn't think there'd be an issue.

Jul 22, 2014
Josh in Beer

Stone in Berlin

Or the Belgo Barleywine

Jul 21, 2014
Josh in Beer

Stone in Berlin

I think it is now. I don't think it was when it came out. (i.e. as "acceptable" levels of hoppiness have increased over the years, Stone's older "hoppy" beers now seem much less so to me than they once did)

Jul 21, 2014
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In Honor of Japan innovation (Japan Craft)

When I go to Japanese restaurants it's pretty rare for me to see Hitachino served. I'm more likely to see Coedo or Echigo Stout/Red if I'm lucky, instead of just Sapporo/Kirin/Asahi. I do like the Asahi Black, though.

Baird makes some interesting beers as well.

Jul 21, 2014
Josh in Beer

Stone in Berlin

Not all of Stone's stuff is like that. Their standard IPA, Enjoy By, Pale Ale, Go To, and Ruination are all pretty approachable, IMO. Levitation and Smoked Porter don't even come close to that description, either. I think they'll do just fine. Schneider's been producing a couple of hoppier-than-normal beers in Germany for some time now.

Jul 21, 2014
Josh in Beer

Stone in Berlin

Jul 20, 2014
Josh in Beer

Stone in Berlin

I don't really know. But there's a guy here with a rather long thread about it.

Jul 20, 2014
Josh in Beer

In Honor of Japan innovation (Japan Craft)

I quite like Echigo Stout. It's very good for pairing with yakitori. The beer in the middle, I forget its name because it's a forgettable beer - I remember being unimpressed. Hitachino Red Rice ale is rather strange, but interesting. Not one I drink with any regularity - Hitachino makes a number of other beers I enjoy a lot more, like XH, Dai Dai, White, and the New Year's anniversary ale.

Jul 20, 2014
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Stone in Berlin

http://m.utsandiego.com/news/2014/jul...

Myth of craft beer continues, despite all the shattering.

Jul 20, 2014
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Beer myths, part 1

Shattering puts a lot of strain on the forearms.

Jul 17, 2014
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Beer myths, part 1

And the name, sir?

Jul 15, 2014
Josh in Beer
1

Beer myths, part 1

I think it depends on what you think is historically important about the name for a particular combination of malts/yeast/hops. Applying a name so that consumers understand better what's in the bottle doesn't seem like something to be bothered by, especially given the panoply of things that are actually worth being bothered by in this world. Calling some beers with similar profiles "quadrupel" vs. nothing descriptive about their contents seems to be pretty insignificant compared to, say, rampant corruption of public institutions for the benefit of oligarchs.

Jul 14, 2014
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Beer myths, part 1

I vote for "pedant".

:-D

Jul 14, 2014
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Beer myths, part 1

You just shattered the myth that styles are only about marketing.

Jul 14, 2014
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Beer myths, part 1

Ditto.

Jul 13, 2014
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Beer myths, part 1

Another good example to look at could be Baltic porter. Do the Baltic regions that make this beer call it that? Do they even call it porter? If not, then it might seem strange to them to see it labeled that way in the US, but I know as a consumer that Baltic porter implies a somewhat different flavor profile than a porter from Britain.

Jul 12, 2014
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Beer myths, part 1

The way BJCP works is you submit your beer under the style and category. In that sense there could well be 170, given that each of the 23 parent categories have many children. There are also a few categories for non-beer fermented beverages like ciders, braggots, and meads.

However those 170 categories are really only intended for judging purposes, so that judges are comparing like with like. From a consumer standpoint in a beer shop they are overkill, and I don't know of many brewers who label their products by the sub-category they'd occupy in a judging context.

Jul 12, 2014
Josh in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

BJCP identifies 23 main styles, which then have sub-styles that still belong to the parent. Given that it attempts to provide a taxonomy for all the styles produced globally that makes sense to me given the numbers from CAMRA and Germany.

It may be a fantasy inasmuch as only one brewery outside Belgium coined the term, but isn't anything that is the first to bear a certain name based on the imagination of the person who concieved of it?

It's not as though there is a Platonic form of tripel.

Jul 11, 2014
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Beer myths, part 1

I understand what you are saying here, but I think it's a little strange to label "quadrupel" a myth since there are breweries making beers sold under that descriptor. I.e. while it may be the case that the term was coined by Koningshoven (aka La Trappe), others have picked up the term and run with it.

And I think there is a certain logic to it: if there can be singel, dubbel, and tripel, then why not quadrupel? Pentupel? Sextupel? I don't know that I'd want to drink one of those, but I hope you get my point.

I know that there were people who opposed the double- and triple-IPA names, and for that matter the concept of a black IPA. But if I'm a brewer trying to sell beer to a crowd that knows what an IPA is, then calling one with higher ABV a double IPA is communicative. It's not hard to infer that it might be a higher alcohol IPA.

Similarly if a given beer audience knows of dubbel and tripel, then it's not a stretch that they could infer the meaning of quadrupel as being even higher in ABV than a tripel.

You call this "just marketing", but if the name helps a customer determine something about the contents of the bottle isn't that beneficial?

To borrow from the wine examples cited here, it's normal to see traditional French blends like Bordeaux or Meritage without the label indicating the varietals that comprise those styles, where in the US it's more common to see the varietal highlighted, and if a blend the varietals prominently displayed because that communicates something about what you can expect from the bottle's contents.

Jul 11, 2014
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Beer myths, part 1

I didn't call you anything. I find your stance hard to comprehend though. In answer to your question about about quadrupel, perhaps the best way to answer is to say it's an American name bestowed upon certain Belgian strong ales which communicates something about what the drinker should expect from its flavor profile. I'm not sure why it matters to you that the term isn't used in Belgium. I'm blunt in my communication, but I'm certainly not intending to be hostile. I genuinely am baffled by your complaint here, as it seems many other people are who are commenting. I'm sorry if anything I wrote caused offense.

Jul 10, 2014
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Beer myths, part 1

I'm sure you can find beers you enjoy without using styles. Complaining about people liking classification is nutty.

Jul 09, 2014
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2

Beer myths, part 1

Another aspect to this discussion that I think Mr. VanDale is missing is that we have a much larger selection of styles to choose from. When you have craft breweries trafficking in English, Bavarian, Czech, Belgian, and French styles of beer-making having ways to identify them is useful for the consumer.

I find our Belgian friend's attitude around this topic as off-putting and discourteous as he finds our classifying of styles. This stuff wasn't engraved on stone tablets by your deity of choice. Perhaps, dare I say it, the BJCP means of classifying styles so that they can be understood pre-purchase is superior to the lack of information communicated on labels in Belgium?

Jul 09, 2014
Josh in Beer
2

Beer myths, part 1

I'd say it's helpful because there's more to a style than ABV:
http://www.bjcp.org/2008styles/style1...

You may not like the designation, but if you read that description and sample one of the beers listed as belonging to that style it's pretty easy to detect the similarities.

Jul 09, 2014
Josh in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

Indeed. And how does one rectify these comments with Chimay's product line, where there is the Cinq Cents, blond and referred to by Chimay as a tripel, as well as the Grande Reserve, which is darker and sweeter?

I guess I understand Thomas' point about the historical meaning of tripel as "strongest beer in the house", but that's pretty useless as a way to describe something. I understand, too, why Europeans dislike the BJCP categorizations, but at least they are useful, unlike simply lumping all the strong trappist ales together under the decidedly non-descriptive term "tripel".

Jul 07, 2014
Josh in Beer
1

Bruery Trade Winds Tripel

He's a good brewer of lagers. Some of his other styles are less successful, IMO. Diacetyl seems to be common in some of his ales. He makes some pretty weird experimental beers from time-to-time, but I haven't had one of those that I've liked.

His Death and Taxes is an excellent schwarzbier.

Jul 03, 2014
Josh in Beer

Bruery Trade Winds Tripel

Agreed 100%. That's one of the reasons I was pleasantly surprised by the one from Bruery, though one could also argue that it's not really much of a tripel, too. Maybe more inspired by a tripel. :-)

Jul 03, 2014
Josh in Beer

Bruery Trade Winds Tripel

I'm more referring to the perceived mouthfeel of the maltier body. It's strictly relative to the lighter mouthfeel of the Trade Winds Tripel. Perhaps "sticky" wasn't the right adjective, but I can't think of a single tripel I've had that I would describe as "refreshing" in the same way I would describe a lighter-bodied beer.

Jul 03, 2014
Josh in Beer

Bruery Trade Winds Tripel

Excellent point. Another great attribute to this beer is the drier finish. It really reduces the sticky mouthfeel one normally gets from so many tripels.

Jul 02, 2014
Josh in Beer

Bruery Trade Winds Tripel

I didn't like this beer when I first tried it, which was many years ago. I recently picked one up on sale, figuring I'd give it another shot and was quite impressed. Rice makes up part of the grain bill, giving the finished product a much lighter body than a standard tripel, which gives the beer a deceptively refreshing quality. The ABV is still pretty big, 9ish%, but you'd never know it thanks to the light body. It's seasoned with Thai basil, which imparts an almost lavender-like floral note. Definitely worth a try if you see it in your area. Not too pricey either, I paid $9 for a 750.

Jul 01, 2014
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Belgian Trippel Blind (or Bland?) Tasting

As with beer, there's no shame in losing to a country that excels so thoroughly.

Jul 01, 2014
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