k

KRS's Profile

Title Last Reply

The Roasting Pan in Saveur 100 this year

Go to the NY Times tests from a few years back at http://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/12/din...

I got the large All-Clad and have never regretted it, but it's big, heavy and expensive. The smaller All-Clad will be fine for anything smaller than a giant turkey. It comes with a great rack and two oven mitts.

Sep 27, 2009
KRS in Cookware

Le Creuset Skillet - Seasoning

Based on Marian Burros's rave review in the NY Times a few years ago, http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/07/din..., I've been coveting the 12" Le Creuset skillet, and found a good price at the company's outlet store. Burros wrote that nothing stuck if you put down a thin film of oil. However, the Le Creuset store said seasoning was essential.

I spread a good coat of grapeseed oil on the inside and put it in a 375 degree oven, upside down on a cookie sheet, for 3 hours, but a good coat didn't develop, and everything sticks terribly.

Who's gotten a LC pan properly seasoned, and how?

Sep 26, 2009
KRS in Cookware

What to order at Sripraphai for party of 12?

Whatever else you get, order drunken noodles -- one for every 3 people. You can't stop eating them.

Sep 26, 2009
KRS in Outer Boroughs

Best Bialys in Brooklyn?

Go to Kossar's on Grand Street in lower Manhattan. It's in a class by itself. They also make small and large onion disks that are ambrosial, plus very good bagels.

Bagel Hole on Coney Island Avenue at Avenue K makes excellent bagels and braided bagel dough rolls. Their bialys are only decent, though.

An unrelated Bagel Hole on 7th Avenue and 12th Street in Brooklyn makes excellent bagels and usually has a stock of Kossar bialys, but they're not as fresh as at the source.

Sep 26, 2009
KRS in Outer Boroughs

Outerbridge's Sherry Peppers Sauce

I've been addicted to Outerbridge's Sherry Peppers Sauce every since the famous NY Mag article back in the 70s, but no NYC store seems to carry it any more. I've tried Busha Browne's, but it's a pale imitation.

Does any place carry Outerbridge's in NYC, or do I have to mail order it from Corti or Zingerman?

Sep 26, 2009
KRS in Manhattan

Arkansas Black Apples - New York City

I've always known them as Arkansas Black Twig. They were my father's favorite. At least one of the stands at Union Square on Saturdays has them. It's the one next to (or near) the information table. They're hard as a rock, and at least the ones I've gotten at that location are rather woody and faintly flavored. That stand also has excellent Jonathans, Winesaps and Macs, but avoid the crosses. For something REALLY hard and sour, try a Greening.

Sep 26, 2009
KRS in Manhattan

Uses for dried Cherries (not just baked goods)

They're amazing sprinkled in cold cereal or oatmeal. I add a dried cranberry/cherry mix every morning. It only takes a few.

Aug 13, 2008
KRS in Home Cooking

Shun Ken Onion

I've handled a couple, and they're gorgeous. However, each one has had an absolutely straight area back by the bolster, which means that the heel of the blade knocks hard against the cutting board when you try rocking the knife back and forth to do chopping.

If you got one, check to make sure that the curve in the blade goes all the way back to the heel.

Also, I'm not sure it's worth the extra-super-premium price.

Aug 07, 2008
KRS in Cookware

Harry and David - Your favorites/recommendations?

My brother gave me the Fruit of the Month, and this month it's "Orogold" peaches. Unfortunately, the box had a sticker on it saying "Grown in South Carolina" so they're not from the same area. They're large, beautifully colored, and have a good peachy flavor, sweet + acid. Alas, they don't taste any where near as good as the splash-juice-up-to-your-elbows peaches of my childhood.

IMHO, their pears and truffles are great, but the rest is not so good.

Nobody is more reliable on shipping and guarantees.

Aug 07, 2008
KRS in General Topics

Boneless chicken thigh recipe needed

This is flavorful meat. Cook it simply to bring that out. I hope the skin is still on.

Rub with salt and pepper, put skin-up in the smallest pan they will fit in without overlapping (I use a metal-handled skillet). Add unpeeled cloves of garlic or unpeeled tiny onions if you like. Dot generously with (real) butter and roast at 400 until the skin is crisp and well browned. For boneless, probably 45 minutes, or an hour if they're really big.

Remove the meat (and garlic and onions to a plate), pour off the fat and deglaze on the stovetop. Vermouth works very well, as does cognac, but you can even use water. When the sauce thickens, pour over and around the meat. A sprinkle of thyme leaves, chopped rosemary or other fresh herbs. The garlic cloves and onions will pop easily out of their peels.

Jul 28, 2008
KRS in Home Cooking

Any hope for tough rib eye steaks that I bought?

Cook's Illustrated had a great method a couple of months ago, which produced beautiful results for me with a lean eye of round.

Defrost the meat and rub it with a modest amount of salt (one teaspoon or a bit more). Refrigerate overnight in a plastic bag. Brown and then roast on a rack in a roasting pan at 250 until bloody rare. Then turn off the oven and let it finish for an hour or so. Don't go beyond the darker side of medium rare or it will toughen.

This produces great flavor and very tender meat.

Jul 23, 2008
KRS in Home Cooking

canned sardines for a newbie

I've tried a bunch and like As Do Mar best. Unfortunately, the US sources have been out of stock for several months. Watch http://www.cortibros.biz/tek9.asp?pg=... and grab them when they arrive.

Jul 23, 2008
KRS in General Topics

wide blade knife for chopping

I got a super-wide 12" Wusthoff custom made for Bridge (I'm a big guy) but it's too big for the space I have. I ended up much happier with a Chinese chef's knife (cleaver shape), which you can get cheap at Chinese stores. Get a medium-weight one (it's a knife, not a cleaver) with a wood handle. See http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Chi... for some expensive examples.

At least for veggies, it cuts with its own weight. All you need to do is put it down and pull or push it slightly. The rectangular blade makes it perfect for scooping up what you've just chopped.

Jun 12, 2008
KRS in Cookware

ribs in nyc??

We went to Dinosaur last week and had a mixed experience. The pork ribs (not baby backs) were very good, well flavored and tender but not falling off the bone. The brisket was superb, moist and really well flavored. My North Carolina wife said the pulled pork was poor, and I didn't care much for it either. The sausages were dreadful, dry and flavorless. The potato salad was weird, homogenized in a food processor. The cole slaw was OK but no more, and the baked beans were good.

Go for the brisket and pork ribs, and avoid the rest.

Jun 12, 2008
KRS in Manhattan

Pork Butt - What to do?

For more than you ever imagined possible, Google "behold my butt" (with the quotes).

Jun 06, 2008
KRS in Home Cooking

whole chinese roasted pig

Any of the Cantonese places that have ducks hanging in the front window will will make you a roast pig. I suggest New York Noodletown at 28 Bowery.

Jun 06, 2008
KRS in Manhattan

Bay Ridge Sichuan - full Sietsema review

I thought the beef with cumin was only OK. The cumin overwhelmed the other flavors. Better is the crispy spicy beef, which is the same dish without the cumin. It might be on the menu now, but when I got it, it was only in the picture section.

The soup dumplings are great. The plain pork is, I think, better than the pork + shrimp, in which the flavors get mixed and muddied.

Jun 05, 2008
KRS in Outer Boroughs

best spot on City Island?

Alas, the answer is False.

With kids, take them to the place all the way at the end, on the dock, which is at least cheap. They'll love the fried butterfly shrimp. Adults stick to the raw bar (if your immune system is up to it) and fried whiting, which is at least fresh-cooked, if just what you get (done better) at Long John Silver.

Jun 01, 2008
KRS in Outer Boroughs

Peter Luger- Steak for 2 for 1 person

PL will happily serve steak-for-two for one. In fact, steak for two is generally agreed to be the perfect size for the best flavor and texture. Anything smaller is too much edge, and bigger is too much center.

Besides, unless you're Diamond Jim Brady (famous for eating the entire menu at a single setting), you'll get the wonderful leftovers to take home.

Jun 01, 2008
KRS in Outer Boroughs

What is the best dip you ever had and the recipe?

Here's a completely idiosyncratic version of Hummus bi Tahini I got from a paperback cookbook brought back from Turkey by a Peace Corps friend. Take the proportions seriously, including the large amount of lemon juice. Guests never leave even a tiny smear in the bowl, no matter how much I make.

1 cup cooked canned chick peas with their liquid
3/4 cup tahini
3/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (essential)
3 cloves garlic, mashed
salt
2 tablespoons EVOO
1 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon chopped parsley

1. Drain chick peas, reserving the liquid. Put the peas and about a third of the liquid in a blender or food processor and blend smooth. Add more chick pea liquid as necessary.

2. Add tahini, lemon juice, garlic, salt, cumin and 1 tablespoon oil and blend until smooth. Add the remaining chick pea liquid as necessary to keep a workable texture.

3. Put in a bowl and cover and refrigerate overnight if possible. Then top with paprika, parsley and the remaining oil. Serve with pita wedges.

Jun 01, 2008
KRS in Home Cooking

Chicken poaching, leftover liquid, what to do?

The bits that don't liquefy are grivenies. They come mostly from skin, but the miscellaneous connective tissue that remains when fat is rendered is what they really are -- with a tiny bit of salt, the very best eating in the world. Few people get to taste them, because the cook gets them as a special treat.

May 29, 2008
KRS in Home Cooking

Non-stick frying pan suggestion?

I've tried a bunch of non-stick pans, including super-heavy/expensive ones (Scanpan/Titanium, Wearever, Calphalon). Alas, the coating never lasts more than a year. Now I just get a new Tfal at $20 at an outlet store and throw the old one away. When I need a non-stick surface plus heat retention, I go to well-seasoned cast iron, or stainless-steel-lined copper if I need tractability or quick screaming heat.

Non-stick doesn't make a good fond, which is another reason I prefer a heavy (Wearever) uncoated aluminum skillet, which I use a lot for roasting chicken. When you're done and deglaze the good stuff, just let it cool, put it in the sink with soapy water and let it soak for an hour or overnight. It cleans up beautifully. Dishwashers aren't best for everything.

May 29, 2008
KRS in Cookware

On the hunt for an Indian specialty

It's on Mina's menu, and is sure to be good. I used to have it at one of older places on 6th street -- the one down three steps that wrapped around beneath a building entrance -- where it was quite good. It had cashews and sliced almonds and was my go-to dish when I was reacting to badly at the rear end to hot stuff.

May 29, 2008
KRS in Outer Boroughs

Burrata mozzarella...

Di Palo's has it, if you can out-wait the line. I got some last week, and we had a feast together with a ciabatta and some wonderful culatelo ("loin of prosciutto").

May 29, 2008
KRS in Manhattan

Need new chuck roast recipe

How have you been preparing your chuck pot roast? My mother taught me to use a whole bottle of red wine and the usual suspects -- peppercorns, cloves, bay leaves, etc. It's fine that way, but you taste mostly the wine.

Lately I've been braising it, with less than an inch of beef stock and no other liquids, cooked at a bare tremble of a simmer in a Le Creuset pot. I use a Doufeu, which has a super-thick bottom that works great on the stove-top and has a well in the lid that holds a quart of water and keeps the temperature down. Plenty of gravy comes out, and the meat flavor is unadulterated.

Another possibility is to use sweet-flavored spices -- a cinnamon stick, star anise, a bit of powdered clove, cumin, coriander and maybe a bit of chopped carrot added near the end.

May 16, 2008
KRS in Home Cooking

Fried Oysters

Yesterday I had a generous serving of perfectly fried oysters in the hangtown fry at Stone Park Cafe in Brooklyn.

May 11, 2008
KRS in Manhattan

First Visit to Stone Park — Not the Last

We went there for brunch yesterday. The food was even a bit better than when we were there before. I had the hangtown fry, and the oysters were perfectly fried, though the egg pancake was a bit overdone and I could have done without the dull home fries. My wife's bluefish cakes were excellent.

The weather was perfect for the outside tables, which improved things a lot, since I the inside tables are too close together for my comfort. Service was polite and well done but slow, as it's been before. They really need to add another waiter/tress.

By Manhattan standards, the prices are reasonable, but for Brooklyn they're high.

May 11, 2008
KRS in Outer Boroughs

kiszka how do you prepare?

Prick it all over with a fork and put it in a roasting pan or ovenproof skillet in the oven at 375-400 until the bottom gets browned and crisp -- 30 to 40 minutes. Then turn it over and let the other side gets crisp. Slice it into serving lengths and cut it open lengthwise with a serrated knife. Start with the soft part in the middle, and be sure to cut up and eat the casing and crisp stuffing, which is the best part. A little Dijon mustard on the side is good with it, as is beer.

If the diameter is large enough, partially freeze it, slice it 1-1/2" thick with a serrated knife and fry it over medium heat on the stovetop.

May 08, 2008
KRS in Home Cooking

Incredible Bay Ridge Sichuan restaurant

We've had excellent "real" dishes, but last week my wife was in the mood for Cantonese and had Chicken Chow Fun, and I decided to chance an "American" dish, Orange Flavored Chicken. The chow fun was top notch Cantonese, with real wok hei, though it seems a waste to go Sichuan and not take advantage of what they do best. Orange chicken was adequate, but no more. From now on, I stick to the real stuff.

May 08, 2008
KRS in Outer Boroughs

Best Curry Goat in NYC?

Spicy Mina serves amazing goat curry. She somehow gets rid of all the usual gristle and bone fragments, and the meat is tender and flavorful.

May 07, 2008
KRS in Manhattan