Bob Martinez's Profile

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No kids allowed?

Rather than get personal, I'll leave you with a suggestion. As a rule, citing works of fiction is not the most effective way to back up a point.

about 8 hours ago
Bob Martinez in Not About Food
1

No kids allowed?

It could have been worse. She could have illustrated her point by citing the behavior of hobbits and elf children.

about 8 hours ago
Bob Martinez in Not About Food

No kids allowed?

"Old people were wasay better 40 years ago."

They're better at spelling.

about 11 hours ago
Bob Martinez in Not About Food

No kids allowed?

In a word, no.

Boomers are now in their 50s and 60s - not the type of customers that restaurant owners are shooting for. They want the free spending crowd from 25 - 40. If an owner takes steps to ban kids they're not doing it just for the Boomers like me.

about 12 hours ago
Bob Martinez in Not About Food

The Beta Site is Getting Closer

"The last go-round for beta-testing took on a mob mentality ..."

Indeed.

about 13 hours ago
Bob Martinez in Site Talk
1

No kids allowed?

A restaurant in Australia bans kids. "Business is better than ever."

http://www.grubstreet.com/2015/07/chi...

about 14 hours ago
Bob Martinez in Not About Food
1

No kids allowed?

"Kids misbehaving is not new."

How would you know? You're 20 years old.

No kids allowed?

We have the evidence of our own eyes. Once you get to be 40 or 50 years old you're equipped to make comparisons between time periods. It's not one or two posters bringing this type of thing. It's a critical mass of people who've been posting on this site for years.

No kids allowed?

Exactly right.

No kids allowed?

Do you think the people on this thread are making this stuff up? I sure don't.

No kids allowed?

Nobody on this thread compared children to dogs.

Nathans Coney Island

And the Big Martys for burgers! Theyre great for other sandwiches too. Every once in a while you find a mass produced product that is as good as the artisanal equivalent. Martin's in one of the rare examples.

Nathans Coney Island

Exactly.

I love the Coney Island Nathan's for the atmosphere but I enjoy the natural casing dogs at home even more. I serve them on a toasted Martin's potato rolls. Just terrific.

Aug 01, 2015
Bob Martinez in Outer Boroughs

Nathans Coney Island

Thanks for that.

The hot dogs served at Nathan's Coney Island location are the natural casing variety, the ones with a nice snap when you bite into them. Most supermarkets serve Nathan's skinless variety - no snap. But if you search a bit you can find the natural casing variety as well.

Aug 01, 2015
Bob Martinez in Outer Boroughs

Nathans Coney Island

With all due respect, you are the one claiming there's a change. The burden of proof is on you.

I assume you haven't found anything. When I did my search yesterday I couldn't find anything except that they removed gluten as an ingredient in 2010.

Aug 01, 2015
Bob Martinez in Outer Boroughs
1

Nathans Coney Island

Any time you've got actual facts I'll be glad to read them.

Aug 01, 2015
Bob Martinez in Outer Boroughs
1

Nathans Coney Island

I'll ask you the same question I asked Remag.

Do you have anything to back this up? Some web articles? A link to a news story? Anything?

I'll point out that you and Remag aren't exactly singing the same song. You say the hot dogs changed a few years ago. He says they changed long before that.

But lets put that to the side. The links that you and Remag provide will resolve that question. I'm looking forward to reading them.

Aug 01, 2015
Bob Martinez in Outer Boroughs

Nathans Coney Island

Guess what? You're wrong again. Born and raised in the Bronx. Moved to Brooklyn in 1979. I get out to Coney Island 4 or 5 times every summer.

No kids allowed?

I'm not a particularly nostalgic person; for example food is much better now than it was 20 years ago.

No kids allowed?

"really? in 1995 kids all behaved, everywhere you went? parents controlled their kids before the latter half of the 1990s?"

Twenty years ago kids melted down at the same rate as they do today. What's different now is that some parents (maybe 20%) ignore their kid's bad behavior. They make no attempt to take control of the situation.

For every instance of uncontrolled bad behavior by kids that I encounter there are 3 or 4 where parents are on top of the situation. When their kid begins to act up they pay attention to them. Sometimes they just talk to the kid, sometimes they play with him, and when all else fails, sometimes one of the parents takes the kid outside for awhile. Sometimes the parents take turns doing this so the other one can eat their meal.

If the parents are doing their jobs the kid's fussing or noise bothers me a lot less. I don't expect perfection in kids but I hold adults to a higher standard. They at least have to *try* to get the kid to settle down.

No kids allowed?

I guess I'm going to have to tell some recent stories. Two of them happened in a single restaurant. The third occurred in another restaurant. Both restaurants, located in Brooklyn,are moderately priced neighborhood places.

Story #1 - Three adult couples brought their 5 or 6 year old kids out to dinner. The kids ate fast and got bored. Then they left the table and ran around the restaurant shrieking. The restaurant was crowded and the servers were trying to deliver plates of food as the kids ran in front of them. The kids got tired of running and all three laid down on the tile floor and made imaginary snow angels, again while the servers had to walk around them. The parents entirely ignored them.

Story #2 - Same restaurant. This time it was a single kid, again about 5 years old. There's a single bench seat that runs along the wall. On the other side of the table are freestanding wooden chairs. Once again the kid finished his meal while the adults lingered so he got bored. He began to walk up and down the bench seat while wearing shoes, dirtying it. Then, for a change, he got on top of the chair and stated jumping up and down. If he had fallen the kid could have cracked his head open if he hit the table or the tile floor. Again, the parents ignored him. Finally the bartender went over and politely got the kid to sit down. The parents looked surprised.

Story #3 - A different restaurant which also has a bench seat along the wall. Another 5 year old who also jumped up and down on the seat for most of the meal. They also rubbed their hands all over the mirror above the seat back, making big streaks. Again, the parents totally ignored him. When the family finally left the staff had to clean both the seat and the mirror.

I never saw this type of behavior 20 years ago. I don't blame the kids - I blame the parents.

This type of nonsense seems to be largely confined to upper middle class parents. Blue collar parents watch their kids and if they act up they get them to settle down.

No kids allowed?

"I'm curious if they feel that children are now less behaved on average than in previous decades. Or if parents use less judgment in what restaurants to take their children to."

There's a 3rd possibility. Some parents (not all but some) don't fulfill their responsibility to monitor their kids behavior and make a good faith attempt to get them behave properly. This is a relatively new phenomenon - you rarely saw it 20 or 30 years ago.

The Beta Site is Getting Closer

It's a slow time of year. This will bring some excitement into our lives.

:-)

Jul 30, 2015
Bob Martinez in Site Talk
1

Scientists have discovered a new taste that could make food more delicious

(Wrong thread.)

Why everyone should stop calling immigrant food ‘ethnic’

Yes, I read it and complimented them on it. It was great to get their perspective.

Why everyone should stop calling immigrant food ‘ethnic’

I've been to Sydney 3 times and thought it was a terrific city. Alas, it was in the 1980s but even then there was a vibrant Chinese and Thai dining scene. I'm sure it's far better now.

I agree that the large cities are almost always going to be the exceptions to the smaller towns as far as the introduction of newer cuisines but that's a process, not an end state. In other words if a cuisine is introduced in New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago often it gradually works it's way towards the smaller cities.

Granted, some places are *never* going to get a Thai or Indian restaurant but a lot of them don't even have Italian or French places. You do need a certain critical mass of people to support cuisines that deviate from the burgers and fried chicken American mainstream.

As I mentioned in some earlier posts, in NYC there's been a major expansion of great Sichuanese restaurants and good Indian places. I say good because London is my standard for Indian. I've been there more than 20 times and most of the better Indian restaurants here would just be good neighborhood places in London. That said, it's a huge improvement over what we had here 20 years ago.

One of the really positive things I've recently noticed, especially at Indian places, is that the number of non-Indian patrons is definitely on the rise. In some places it's more than 50%. People are discovering Indian food and finding that they like it.

It's a positive trend that promises even better restaurants in the future as the market expands to meet a growing demand.

Why everyone should stop calling immigrant food ‘ethnic’

What a great post. Thanks for that.

Why everyone should stop calling immigrant food ‘ethnic’

I remember that thread but I think it's inaccurate to say "many posters couldn't contemplate mid priced to expensive Indian restaurants."

I just reread it. There were 177 replies and just a handful of them focused on low cost. Just as many talked about mid priced places. Mine did.*

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/1006...

There was also this quote in the article that kicked off that thread -

"There are more than 300 restaurants that serve cuisine from across the subcontinent in New York City alone, according to Krishnendu Ray, a professor at New York Univeristy who has been studying the cuisine's rise for more than a decade. Compare that to the mere 20 Indian restaurants that could be found in the Big Apple in the early 1980s."

Somehow falling under the ethnic banner hasn't hurt Indian food in NYC.

* The original article did devote considerable space to talking about cost issues. The thread itself did not. People who didn't like Indian food spent a lot more time talking about how they didn't like the spicing.

Why everyone should stop calling immigrant food ‘ethnic’

I linked to 4 dictionaries in an earlier post. None of them identified "ethnic" as a slur. It's an adjective that has been in use on Chowhound from the beginning.

After this thread has run it's course we'll go back to using it.

Why everyone should stop calling immigrant food ‘ethnic’

"I remember a thread about Indian food where many posters couldn't contemplate mid priced to expensive Indian restaurants - which is a bit of a shame. Its almost because they fit into an "ethnic" category they must be under $20 a head."

Where was that? Because it sure wasn't the Manhattan board. Some of the longest threads are about Indian and Chinese restaurants where the check can run between $100 and $140 for two. That's relatively inexpensive for NYC but a far cry from the $20 a head example you cited.

"I am certain the same applies to other "ethnic" cuisines making it hard for restaurants to develop their offerings and potentially offer better food etc."

You live in an alternate universe. In NYC there has been an explosion in the number quality Sichuanese and Indian restaurants over the last 20 years. Somehow that happened while the word "ethnic" was in use.