susancinsf's Profile

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Central Valley Pies

On the way to or from Yosemite, Jantz in Atwater, Merced or Mariposa, great fruit pies and cream pies (the chocolate cream pie is excellent, and I don't even like chocolate cream pies all that much). Peach and apricot outstanding in season. The Merced and Atwater locations serve breakfast and lunch also. Closed Sundays.

Sep 04, 2014
susancinsf in California

Cinema Cafe, Merced: two thumbs up

As I mentioned on another thread, Cinema Cafe is now open Sundays. It is still my favorite breakfast spot in town, and the corned beef hash is my regular order. As good as ever.

However, when I went on Sunday, intending to meet some out of town friends, I was astonished to see that it was packed, with a wait! I eat there at least once a month, but recently have only been on weekdays, when I've never had to wait for a table.

Having to wait for a table at a breakfast place in Merced? (indeed, they told us it might be a long wait, and since time was an issue, we ended up going to Paul's Place instead...) Hmm...in a strange sort of a way that is something to celebrate!

Aug 25, 2014
susancinsf in California
1

Paul's Place and Bakery, Merced; breakfast report

Update:

Friends from the SF Bay Area were in town this weekend to drop off their freshman son at UC Merced, so we decided to meet for brunch Sunday before they moved him into the dorms. We had originally planned to meet at Cinema Cafe, which (further update) now IS open Sundays (and Saturdays) and which remains my favorite breakfast spot in Merced, with great corned beef hash.

Cinema Cafe doesn't take reservations and is small, so I went down early intending to snag a table or spot on the list, and was astounded to see that it was packed, with at least five tables filled out on the sidewalk and parties waiting! The part of me that wanted to to show off our home town was disappointed (especially since the weather was lovely, perfect for outdoor dining, which is often not the case in Merced in late August!). OTOH, the local homeowner part of me was thrilled to see a business doing so well on our Main street downtown: perhaps the end of the recession has finally reached downtown Merced! (either that or every new UC Merced student and their families have somehow heard of Cinema Cafe...)

Anyway, when the hostess sadly informed me that they wouldn't be able to sit our party of five for quite some time, I texted my friends and put 'plan B' into action: called Paul's Place and they told me it might be a short wait but that they could seat us quickly. Sure enough, once we got there, it was only a five minute or so wait for a nice table in the back. (Although Paul's was also quite busy, as it often is on Sunday with the 'after church' crowd).

Service was very friendly and efficient (though when the server heard why my friends were in town, she told the freshman that 'there is nothing to do in this town...but at least you won't have distractions from studying'...probably not what he wanted to hear even if his parents did.)

I had a spanish omelet this time, with fruit. No complaints, nice job on the omelet. The 'cajun sausage' that my friend ordered with her eggs and toast were very good. Portions were a bit smaller than I remember but I had plenty to eat and prices have not gone up. My friends were impressed with the quality and the reasonable prices and said that they'd definitely go back. Paul's remains a solid breakfast choce in Merced.

Aug 25, 2014
susancinsf in California

Small town restaurant + Bad experience = Would you go back?

Aww...It's not that bad. Try Bangkok Thai (old report, but I still eat there regularly, and on the rare occaisons I get downtown at lunch, that is one of our top choices):

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/699391

Or email me and we can check out the new Mexican place. Besides, when I read some of the other descriptions of small towns on this thread, I realize that mine isn't that small....otoh, when you compare it to the SF Bay area...yeah, not great. I've been known to hang out at Costco also. At least we HAVE a Costco!

By the way, someone mentioned breakfast in another post. I had some friends visiting from out of town Sunday and wanted to take them to my favorite breakfast place, but it was so crowded we couldn't get in! (and woohoo for that, there have been many times when I was practically the only customer, happy to see them doing a bang=up business). Went with a backup place, and my friends from the big city were very happy with it, partially because it said, 'small town' to them, but also because the food was good (not great, but it was good) and quite a bit less expensive than they were used to...with very friendly and helpful service. That does count. Hmm...think I will go do an update on the California board...

Aug 25, 2014
susancinsf in Not About Food

Honeymoon in PNW - Vegetarians Seeking Meals / Lodging

I am sure you know quite a lot more about it than I do, but I do think it is important to point out (for the benefit for those who do know less and are reading this and think, 'well that sounds cool', if for no other reason) that varieties do, well, vary, and that the rules aren't the only issue to pay attention to. There is very thorough information at the Puget Sound Mycological Society webpage, including information about the rules at local WA state parks, etc:

http://www.psms.org/index.php

I'd personally not want to eat mushrooms anyone had picked if they hadn't thoroughly reviewed those local rules; in fact, if it were my health at stake, I'd want to know they'd reached out to the local experts before picking.....

Aug 25, 2014
susancinsf in Greater Seattle

Honeymoon in PNW - Vegetarians Seeking Meals / Lodging

I'd research more than just the rules and regs. I can't speak to Washington or Oregon, but people die almost every year in Northern California because they eat picked mushrooms that look exactly like a species they are familiar with elsewhere, but that are actually a different and quite poisonous variety.

Aug 25, 2014
susancinsf in Greater Seattle

Food at Hearst Castle

I've eaten at Sebastian's, but if you have to eat while at the Castle itself, that isn't an option. I haven't tried any of the places there, but last time I was there one of the options was selling locally raised grass fed beef trip-tip sandwiches (Hearst has their own brand) that looked quite good, so that is an alternative to packing your own. Please do report back if you try it.

Aug 25, 2014
susancinsf in California

Kas and the Turquoise Coast - Turkey - Report

I've never seen a dreamier look in hubby's eyes than when he is describing all of the food he ate on an extended trip throughout Turkey (before I knew him). Your pics help me see why. The squid does look amazing. Thanks for the post and I hope to go someday myself!

Aug 24, 2014
susancinsf in Europe
1

Picky eaters are the bane of my existence...and now I live with them

bblonde, you have my sympathy. It is hard enough to be a parent to a 15 year old girl (which in my experience, having had one, was the WORST age of all for teenage angst, etc.). But a 15 year old teenage stepdaughter? almost impossible to navigate those waters unscathed....

I've never been a stepparent, but hubby has. He and I got married when my daughter was 15, and she did live with us. A few thoughts based on my own experiences and observations from that time:

First, yes, of course, it is an act of defiance. Being 15 is all about defiance (especially for girls, IMO), and add to that the fact that she has to deal with a stepmom. Of course a part of her is angry. So (as others have said) don't buy into it by insisting she eat your foods. That will only escalate the war. If your husband insists she eat with you at dinner, insist that HE enforce that rule, not you. She is old enough to make her own decisions, and live with them.

Related: don't feel bad about the defiance. Others have said 'don't take it personally'. Well, frankly, it probably IS at least in part personal. A part of her feels like you've stolen her Dad from her at a tough point in her life. Don't feel bad regardless. You can't control it, you can't change it. There is plenty of love to go around, plenty of anger too. Don't try to fix it, or her, whatever you do.

Secondly, while I think it is great to try and involve her in cooking, baking, whatever, IF she is interested, DON'T push it, and whatever you do, don't ever let her think you are doing this to try and help her or for her benefit. She will just resent you and think you are interfering. Especially don't give her the message that you are trying to help her grow up by giving her life skills that she can use when on her own. The message she will hear is 'Stepmom thinks I am not good enough as I am. Besides that, she can't wait to get rid of me. *()#($)# her.' IMO, the way to involve her is sort of the same way Tom Sawyer got others to paint the fence: let her know you are going to bake cookies (or whatever) and that you are going to have fun doing it....and you are perfectly happy to do it alone, because it is FUN, but if she wants to join in and then get to taste test, well that's ok too.... Note that I am NOT suggesting you cater to her: let her know that you are asking about the menus so that you can plan what YOU are doing because that is important to you. If she doesn't like the offerings she can figure it out on her own, and cook from the freezer. Don't force, don't cater. Let her come to you when she is ready. If she is never ready, that's ok too.

But here's the thing: it does get better. You may be surprised at what you get back some day. Someday she will show her appreciation for you and possibly even for the food you cook. Hopefully it will be before she turns thirty. :-)

Small town restaurant + Bad experience = Would you go back?

I live (now, handle notwithstanding) in a small town in an agricultural area. Great produce and good farmer's market's everywhere, but finding good food in a restaurant within sixty miles is a challenge (and I am not into driving an hour for dinner).

There are a few good places, but very few. The two best places are Thai and Southeast Asian, and not expensive, but while I like Thai food I don't want to eat it more than a few times a month at most. No good place to eat at work, and no restaurants at all within four miles of my workplace. So unless I drive, not even a good lunch spot...There are some chains. A lot of people around here celebrated when we got a Panera, but I haven't even been and don't really want to go.

I will say based on my experience that it must be a pretty small town if you can't find *anything*. I've not really lived in any other small towns, but I have spent some time in small towns in Western PA when hubby's mom was alive and living there. Even in that chain-intense area we found a few good places to eat.

What really doesn't ring true about your rule where I live is the bad service part: I can't say the service is at big city level, but then most of the restaurants tend to be Mom and Pop type places. Service is never surly: the only place in town with surly service didn't last. (I wonder if service would be worse at the chains than at the Mom and Pop places?).

In any case, hope springs eternal, and new places pop up regularly. Just the other day someone gave me a lead on a really good new Mexican place I am planning to try soon (hope springs eternal that someday there will in fact be an outstanding Mexican place, since my town is about 50% Latino, but so far, no such luck...)

My solution: we try the new places, but eat out much, much less than when we lived in San Francisco and could walk to great or even world class restaurants. I bring my lunch to work every day (something I never did in the City) and cook a lot more. We garden. We get to know our local farmers. Fine dining is something we do only when on weekends away, vacations, or while travelling for work. Both my budget and waistline like the change.

The only aspect of living in the City I really miss is the restaurant scene. Hubby doesn't even miss that. So to answer your question, no, I wouldn't go back even when served mediocre food with surly waitstaff. But yes, keep looking!

Aug 23, 2014
susancinsf in Not About Food

Railway Dininig. Ever experience it ?

hubby had a similar mediocre experience years ago, made worse than mediocre by the fact that his party shared their seating/car with a very LOUD and very drunk large group. On a train it is hard to get away from the crowds if the train itself is crowded...

Aug 23, 2014
susancinsf in General Topics

Hatch chiles 2014

Merced Raley's now has both hot and mild for 99 cents a lb. Watch your checker when ringing them up to be sure he or she knows chiles: mine rung up today's batch as Pasillas which cost twice as much per pound. (she cheerfully corrected it immediately when I pointed out the error).

I already roasted last week's batch and can verify that they were indeed hot. Today I bought some of each.

Aug 23, 2014
susancinsf in California

Hatch chiles 2014

Mentioned this on the bay area board, but for those of us in the CV, Raley's in Merced (and presumably other valley branches of Raley's) has green hatch chiles at 99 cents a lb today. Labeled 'hot'.

Aug 16, 2014
susancinsf in California

Hatch Green Chiles 2014

They had hatch chiles at the Raley's in Merced today, 99cents a lb. My guess is that means they are in the bay area Raley's stores as well, since we are never ahead of you all. I bought a few pounds to roast at home, no roasting facilities in this particular store.

Edited to add: haven't tasted any yet, but they are labeled 'hot'. (yay).

New in Santa Barbara

When we were looking for a spot for a recent dinner, I rejected Scarlett Begonia because the online menu didn't look like it would be work well for our group with a vegetarian and a pescatarian. Besides, our local dining companions both voted for Lark...so as I mentioned in another post we went there and had a great time and a great meal.

Still, I am drawn to Scarlett Begonia (because of the name, mostly :-)) and will be back in Santa Barbara later this year, so am curious what your thoughts about how it will work for folks not interested in meat, Glbtrtr?

Aug 15, 2014
susancinsf in California

How is Rosine's in Monterey?

I've had breakfast there. Good for a group for breakfast because they take reservations, whereas a lot of the other nearby breakfast places would have a wait and/or not accomodate a group. The food was good, but nothing spectacular. They are known for their cakes, which looked good in the display case, but which we didn't try.

Large selection of pasta, but still I am not sure I'd really call the menu Italian...:

http://www.rosinesmonterey.com/Menus/...

On a weekend, I'd be inclined to try the prime rib dinner...

Aug 14, 2014
susancinsf in California

Need Serious Help - Party of 10 for Tomorrow Night

Four of us had a very early dinner the other night, after a (day) Giants game. Right on the longish walk back from the ballpark to BART. We asked to be seated in a quiet area, and they put us in what I'd call the the back room (which I am guessing is what others refer to as the side room: it is behind the bar area and to the back). It was perfect, not at all loud, and very cozy. When we left the restaurant was almost full (other than the back room, which had about half the tables occupied) but we still weren't bothered at all by the noise and could talk in normal conversational voices. (no music, however). I did notice some curtains in front of one of the walls: is it possible they are a recent addition to help with noise?

As for the food and drink, it was a hit. Great version of a maitai for me, and hubby had a non alcoholic drink with cucumber that was very refreshing, balanced. All of the food was excellent, but standouts for me were the dolmas (not traditional at all, more like a small stuffed pepper, full of flavor) and the bone marrow, which was absolutely delicious. Indeed, we ordered a second order of that bone marrow.

I used to go there for lunch regularly years ago. It's been a long while since I've been back. I now have a post game go-to place for those rare times I get to the City to see my Giants....and yes, I'd take a group there in a heartbeat (and request a table in the back/side room)

Possible Double Standard Regarding Dietary Needs/Preferences

I can't speak to commercial preparation, but I will say that my Muslim daughter, Muslim SIL, and their many Muslim friends all tell me that at least for them, kosher is halal, but halal isn't kosher. This is a good thing where I live, since (despite the fact that the small Muslim population in our town is considerably higher than the tiny Jewish population, and growing, while the Jewish population is not growing) most of our local stores stock a fair number of kosher items and absolutely no halal items.

No matter: When daughter and family come to visit, they often bring halal meat from their big city where it is available. When we go out, they generally eat seafood (they will happily eat shellfish), or go vegetarian. Or I cook meals with the meat they bring, or we go vegetarian at home, which solves a lot of dietary issues for a crowd, to be honest. or a combination of vegetarian and kosher hot dogs for the grandkids (easy to find almost anywhere, in my experience).

In short, I don't find it to be any harder to accomodate a halal diet than it would be to accomodate a vegetarian diet.

Aug 10, 2014
susancinsf in Not About Food

Organic Fresno [Hwy 99]

just a wild guess :-) No, seriously, I am not at all into wraps, which limited my options. My DC really liked her wrap quite a bit, just not my thing. Next time I want to try the meatballs, or possibly the 'fake tuna'. (made with garbanzos).

Aug 09, 2014
susancinsf in California

The Lark in Santa Barbara

I had one night for dinner in Santa Barbara other than as an organizer of a retreat that would require me to eat on the UCSB campus (their on campus catering does a remarkably good job, fortunately, with an emphasis on fresh and organic ingredients. I was even pleasantly surprised to see Straus milk and yogut in the dining commons!).

Two of us from Merced asked our two colleagues from UCSB where they'd like to eat, and both voted for the Lark. So we made a reservation (definitely needed, even on a week night!) and headed out. Hadn't read Polar Bear's remarks about parking for the wine shop (which would have been annoying to me too), but on the other hand, when we got there at about seven we were very happy to have valet parking: it may be an industrial area but we saw no available street parking within several blocks.

As mentioned, the place was hopping on a Thursday night; we were seated in a cozy booth that shielded us from the worst of the noise.

For us, Lark was a hit. We all had a great time (the two locals had both been previously) and the two of us from Merced whined as we speculated on how many decades it might be before our small town had anything comparable :-)) Two of the four are vegetarian or pescatarian, so we mostly stuck to items we all could share. Highlights included the fried olives, the brussel sprouts (almost a cliche on small plate menus these days, perhaps, but these were as good as any I've had); panzanella; brocollini; grilled octopus (which I don't eat for personal reasons, but which those who do indulge raved about); and the whole branzino (perfectly cooked). I can't pass up bone marrow when I see it on a menu: a very nice version. The homemade gnocchi would have been wonderful had the crab been fresh (the gnocchi themselves were almost perfect, but they were in a distracting sauce with Dungeness, which of course isn't in season; one of my dining companions insisted on ordering it anyway): as it was, it was a near miss with presumably previously frozen crab. We also had a cheese plate which was fine, not outstanding; I think there were one of two other items that weren't as memorable. We were too full to even consider dessert, other than the cheese.

Dinner for four with tip, a cocktail or two and a bottle of french rose was about $200. I'd definitely return.

Aug 09, 2014
susancinsf in California

Battered Fries. Are they french fries?

well, I guess I would have to say somewhere in the middle between the two: I wouldnt call it a thick batter, but not thin either. Would it make a difference?

Aug 09, 2014
susancinsf in General Topics

Organic Fresno [Hwy 99]

A colleague and I recently had lunch here enroute to Santa Barbara from Merced. Pace was a bit leisurely due to the fact that our meals were made to order; service was excellent and friendly.

Both lunches started with a vegetable bean soup, which was delicious, and a simple, perfectly dressed salad of fresh greens. Colleague had a wrap (can't remember which one) and I had the chicken tikka masala, tasty but not memorable. There were a lot of baked goods at the counter but we didn't indulge. Colleague did buy some natural dried fruit for the road. Lunch here definitely fit the bill as a healthy alternative to either diner food or fast food, to keep us going on the long road trip.

Aug 09, 2014
susancinsf in California

What worked and didn't work about Chowhound

I am not sure this answers your question, since I am not sure whether what I find to be the best of CH can be replicated in a 'good site for civilized discourse about food' (which sounds, well, perhaps a tad formal?)...however, in the years I've been on Chowhound the best part of the site for me, has been the opportunity to meet people (both personally and virtually) whose appreciation for food meets and exceeds my own. I have several good friends that I met on or through Chowhound. In many cases, I originally met these friends either at bay area Chowdowns, or in many cases at the SF Board CH picnic, which served for at least several years as a fundraiser for the Site back in the days when Jim Leff owned it....Not sure how you replicate that, but if you can, more power to you.

I do think that diversity is key: one of the reasons I loved the Chowdowns (and organized a few of my own) was that they presented a the chance to meet folks from a variety of backgrounds but with a common passion for food.

Battered Fries. Are they french fries?

It happened to me again: at a decent brew pub (although the emphasis was on the beer, not the food), burgers came with an option of 'french fries' on the side according to the menu. There was a small extra charge for the fries, but I went for it and ordered them.

What I received was a good burger, medium rare as ordered, and battered fries. Sigh. I really dislike battered fries, ate none of them, and wouldn't have ordered them had I known, but the menu had no description besides 'french fries'.

For some reason this seems to happen to me most often at brew pubs, but I still forget to ask if fries are indeed just potato, salt, oil. I left the fries and didn't complain, but would I have been out of line to point out that I ordered fries and got something else? Is a battered fry still a french fry or is it a different item?

Aug 08, 2014
susancinsf in General Topics

Totally Lost in Embarcadero with Co-Workers [San Francisco]

personally, I usually judge whether someone is a tourist by whether they are dressed in summer clothes or not, especially if they are sweaterless and/or their sweater is a local sweatshirt. Folks from Berkeley would never make the mistake of going into the City in the evening in shorts or a T. Of course, now that I live in the Central Valley I've sometimes been guilty of making this mistake myself....but then, I suppose I am now a tourist in my (former) home. And yes, I've seen an increase in tourists and (now that I sometimes need a place to stay) hotel prices the past year or so, presumably a sign of an improving economy...I'd agree that a group should make reservations.

White Wolf Lodge Update, 2014

Meant to add to my report: yes, the phone lines are down but they do have internet by satellite (in the office only, not for guests, and email isn't an option for making a dinner reservation). The satellite is used mostly to order supplies and run credit cards, so yes, they accept all major credit cards as payment for meals.

Jul 21, 2014
susancinsf in California

White Wolf Lodge Update, 2014

I will be in Glen Aulin for two nights in two weeks (with yet another stay at White Wolf to acclimatize first. Life is rough :-)) and will report back on the food. Very excited! I can report that we stayed and ate at the May Lake High Sierra Camp for one night last year and the food was excellent. One note about the backcountry camps: unlike Tuolumne Meadows and White Wolf, alcoholic beverages are not available for sale. You either pack in your own, or if you are really thinking ahead and your wine really matters to you, there is a way to have it shipped in by mule back, but that is quite expensive, and I am not sure if it will be possible to arrange in advance given that the phones are down....

Jul 21, 2014
susancinsf in California

White Wolf Lodge Update, 2014

I've been lucky enough to be in Yosemite National Park several times already this summer (we do live relatively nearby), and have had three dinners and a few breakfasts at White Wolf Lodge on the Tioga Road. Thought I'd do a quick update for those looking for spots to eat in the park. In the past few years, the food at White Wolf has disappointed (even by not-too-high Yosemite standards) but they have a new chef, or something, and we've been very pleased this year. A few pointers and thoughts:

-White Wolf is a good option if you are driving on the Tioga Road, and would even be a viable option for those staying in the Valley if you've been out hiking or visiting the high country for the day. You don't need to stay at the tent cabins at the lodge to eat there, (although it is a great place to stay), the restaurant is open for breakfast and dinner (no lunch served, other than bag lunches you can order the night before if you are a lodge guest).

-the phones are currently down all along the Tioga Road, including in Tuolumne Meadows and at White Wolf, and are likely to be down for a long time (indeed, there is some question as to whether they can be fixed at all: the main phone line was buried several weeks ago in a massive rock slide). So, while reservations are accepted if you are there in person (so you could stop by in the am for a dinner reservation that night) it means that you don't need to make a reservation: show up for one of the four seatings and they should be able to seat you. (don't show up at nine pm expecting to eat, however, dinner ends early. I think the last seating is at 7:45 p.m. although I did see some folks come in at eight and get seated).

-all dinners are family style and you will eat with strangers. There is a fixed menu that varies by day of the week, with vegetarian and other special diet options available on request (at one dinner they made a delicious- looking pasta dish to order for a patron with a number of allergies that coincided with the ingredients in the main offerings.) Dinner as a fixed price meal with soup, salad, main course and veggies/sides, and dessert, but while they don't advertise it they will serve just soup and salad (plus bread) for a lower price (although I forgot to ask what that lower price is). Beer and wine are available for purchase, and we saw folks bring their own bottles as well.

-the full four course dinner is $29 for four courses, there is a $4 senior discount for ages sixty and over, and I think children under 12 are also less. A full buffet breakfast is $12 (with a slight senior discount); continental breakfast which includes hot cereal is $7.95 (no senior discount on the continential breakfast). All meals are all you can eat (served on platters family style, and just ask for more if you want it). While it isn't cheap, prices are reasonable for the remote location and the limited dining options in the vicinity (closest other restaurants at in Tuolumne Meadows and Yosemite Valley, each about 40 to 45 minutes drive away; or you can get groceries at Crane Flat, about a 20 to 30 minute drive away).

-As mentioned, menus vary by day of the week: we've had Saturday's steak dinner twice, and the flatiron steak was actually served medium rare as requested (yay), with a real baked potato and grilled asparagus, plus soup, a great tossed salad (with lettuce at one meal, a fresh spinach salad at another), and dessert. The veggie option one night was a stuffed belled pepper. We've also had the Friday night option of chicken 'fajitas', which was really grilled pieces of chicken, grilled veggies, rice and beans, served with salsa, warm tortillas you could make into a sort of burrito (along with soup, salad and dessert). Not as good as the steak, but decent.

-I've had three different soups, and all have been housemade and very good to excellent (soups are all vegetarian). Desserts have been a highlight: an excellent carrot cake one night, outstanding cheesecake another night, and a delicious apple pie. Whoever is making the desserts this year knows what they are doing.

-service otoh, is fairly amatuerish, but very friendly. Most of the staff are college students and recent grads enjoying some time in the mountains.

White Wolf Lodge will be closed all of the 2015 season for rennovations, to reopen in 2016. Hope they can keep the current chef. This is the first year in several that the food is good enough to put this one on the recommended list.

Jul 20, 2014
susancinsf in California

Big Island - Kohala Ranch and beyond.

I recall seeing their mushrooms in shops when I was there in May, so my guess is probably yes (?).

Jul 15, 2014
susancinsf in Hawaii

Big Island - Kohala Ranch and beyond.

no, that makes sense, and please do report back on any places you try: We visit the BI as often as we can afford (or maybe even a bit more often than that :-)) and updates are always welcome!

Regarding the cooking at home: absolutely the way to go, even if the house weren't amazing. The quality of Big Island fish, meats and produce exceeds the quality of its restaurants, at least in my opinion. There is good dining there, but not much in the way of great dining, and yet lots of great ingredients.

Hawi has a Saturday Farmer's Market, by the way (I think), and Waimea has two on Saturdays...(as well as a mid-week market on Wednesday).

Edited to add: my email is in my profile: would love a private message with a link to the house you are staying in...especially if you end up loving it as much as you expect to do. Have fun!

Jul 15, 2014
susancinsf in Hawaii