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Why Chinese cuisines/dishes do not include raw vegetables...

If you are responding to my post, then I don't get the 'mountain' theory in respect to health concerns. The same concerns for worms, microbes, nasty decomposition could happen on eirther side of these hypothetical mountains.

The Chinese use ginger, the Lao use ginger. But you will see a lot of raw ginger on the Lao table and none in China. It is a different ethnicity, and topography does not explain it.

about 8 hours ago
Steve in General Topics

What type of cuisine do you NOT like?

Well said. SInce I am so familiar with French Provincial cuisine, I feel confident in saying that 99% of French restaurants outside of France barely represent the diversity of French food. From my travels it seems to be the case with many other cuisines as well.

I also know that simply traveling somewhere or having that one great dish will not turn around someone who hates XXXX cusine. It is usually a process of conditioning that allows people that 'aha' moment when they finally 'get' why so many other people love something they previously shunned.

about 11 hours ago
Steve in General Topics
1

Why Chinese cuisines/dishes do not include raw vegetables...

Hmmmm, do you think none of these are a concern in Laos? They rely heavily on eating raw food products as part of their cuisine. They not only wrap food in various leaves, but will eat raw sliced eggplant, ginger, peanuts, chilis, tomatoes, and other products in those wraps. banana flower salad and other salads also play a prominent role. And what about Burma, which also borders China? The array of salads in their cuisine is impressive.

Why does taking one step over the border so thoroughly change the health consideration?

about 11 hours ago
Steve in General Topics

What type of cuisine do you NOT like?

There may be more growth than you realize. In the Washington, DC area, I can enjoy Dongbei, Taiwanese, Shanghainese, and Yunnanese in addition to others, but they are usually on the infamous 'secret' menu.

Here is an article from The Guardian about what is going on right now in London, which includes both a Guizhou and a Shanghainese restaurant. If you find a Dongbei restaurant, that will introduce a lot of very different dishes, and you will see the shift from rice to wheat.

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandsty...

about 16 hours ago
Steve in General Topics

What type of cuisine do you NOT like?

Ah, I see. Strange that you describe Chinese cuisine in a way I recognize only via bastardization.

about 24 hours ago
Steve in General Topics

Old restaurants in Beijing

In 2009, I ate at Bienyifang, which is famous for their Beijing Duck, theroetically smoked with straw.

I went to the address I had, but the building was burnt down. I could see the charred remains of the building. It looked very old, though I do not know how old. The restaurant relocated to the third floor of a shopping mall, kitty-corner from the old building. I had to ask around of quite a few people (I had the name written in Chinese) before I finally came across someone who knew where it was.

The meal was unremarkable. The duck was better than I can normally find in the US, but still not worth the effort. The experience was fairly boring.

What type of cuisine do you NOT like?

" I love Tex Mex, but I'm not even sure whose cuisine it belongs to (is it part of "American cuisine"?)"

Tex-Mex is from the border area of Texas and Mexico, either side. And considering that Mexico is in North America, not to mention America in general, I would say that Tex-Mex is definitely as American as pastel de manzanas.

1 day ago
Steve in General Topics

Do you hate organizing dinner outings?

I find it's easier to pick a place, date and time, then invite. No haggling.

2 days ago
Steve in General Topics

What type of cuisine do you NOT like?

South Florida (Del Ray, right?) is particularly weak on the subject of East Asian. Might as well be talking about the Mexican scene in Sweden.

Many a Chowhond would agree with your assessment of Chinese food if that was all there was to it. Japanese food is a different matter. In the US, its aesthetic is rarely reproduced, at which point it would take most folks some time to appreciate.

2 days ago
Steve in General Topics

Recommendations please for DC, impromptu visit

Yes, and there's more including Siroc and the small plates at 2 Amys and Bibiana, and then Red Hen as the OP mentioned.

I *think* Osteria Alba is doing some kind of affordable chef's table dinner on Thursdays now.

What type of cuisine do you NOT like?

"I sense that it is mostly a status thing and a way to show off."

If someone had written this about sushi in the US twenty-five year ago, I might have believed you. Go to many college campuses right now and you will see sushi in little plastic containers in the campus market that cost about $6 bucks. It's in just about every grocery store. Sushi has replaced Italian in family-oriented strip shopping centers. People eat it for many reasons: it's a cheap meal on the run. It's a fun family meal. It's not fattening. They crave it. No cooking or reheating involved. Lots of reasons. But 'status' in 2014, hardly. That might be reserved for the very few places that, like any cuisine, cater to specialized and expensive tastes. In many big cities, there may be three or four places where connoisseurship plays an important role. All those other places, and they are legion, are providing a cheap and convenient meal.

Nowadays those college kids I referred to have been enjoying it since they were little. People who would not touch all kinds of exotic food are reaching happily for those containers. My kids love it and will eat it for a quick meal from the grocery store.

This entire thread has to do with conditioning, which I can say for every cuisine. If you are conditioned to like something, it is almost certain that you will.

For whom still does Receipt = Recipe?

In French, the word is recette.

Nov 18, 2014
Steve in Not About Food

Should I be offended over a frozen pie?

I disagree with some of my fellow Chowhounds. The host should make sure the guest is comfortable. There is nothing wrong with serving me a frozen pie, but I probably wouldn't do that to a baker who has offered to bring a pie. I would play the gracious host.

Seems to me that living far away is a huge positive in this case.

Nov 18, 2014
Steve in Not About Food

Nominate your favorite restaurants in Washington DC & Baltimore for "Best of 2014."

Do we nominate on this thread? What are the categories?

Duke's Grocery in DC - Report

Next time I will try the catfish banh mi.

Duke's Grocery in DC - Report

Thanks for the rec.

Why Chinese cuisines/dishes do not include raw vegetables...

Your produce from China is locavore compared to our produce from Chile...

Nov 18, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Duke's Grocery in DC - Report

Although the name of this place is Duke's Grocery, it is actually a tiny bar/restaurant near 17th & P Sts, NW that you could easily miss walking right past it. There's a very subtle sign out front that says "Duke's." The menu is exclusively appetizers and sandwiches.

We tried three sandwiches:

A chicken milanesa, salt beef, and their variation of a cubano. There is an emphasis on housemade, high quality ingredients, but the results are mixed.

The milanesa part of the sandwich was great, but the toppings of tomato, lettuce, and mashed avocado are icebox cold. Unappetizing on a hot sandwich. The salt beef (I wasn't sure what this would be) looks like corned beef. It is very tender, cut in thick slabs. As the name implies, less complicated in flavor than corned beef. The best was the cubano, with the pork served dripping moist. Very good, though I like the Fast Gourmet version better.

The star of their sandwiches are the housemade pickles. Extraordinary. This is not an expensive place, with the sandwiches topping out at $!2. Despite the low key exterior, the joint was jumping. So it looks like everyone found out about it before I did.

I would go back to investigate further, especially some of the appetizers like smoked trout or pork rillettes.

Why Chinese cuisines/dishes do not include raw vegetables...

My response was to Roland Parker, former Bawlmer denizen who I *think* is frustrated with the fruits and vegetables in Dubai.

Nov 17, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Recommendations please for DC, impromptu visit

I notice you've never reported back about any of your past experiences on Chowhound. Did you ignore the advice? Find it useless? Chowhound is a two-way street. It's helpful if people respond in some way.

Among my favorite desserts are...

Central Michel Richard. I would consider eating a meal here, and especially go for the fried chicken. And the mac n cheese on the side. Also the faux gras to start off with and the tuna burger is great as well. French take on American classics. For dessert, you may want to consider ordering some macarons. They only make two or three flavors each day, so you don't get much of a choice, but the quality is sky high. May not appear on the menu, you just have to ask.

Ben's Chili Bowl is not a must visit. In the same neighborhood, if you want soul food, go for Oohhs and Aahhs, a tiny kitchen with a small hidden dining room upstairs. A true hole-in-the-wall. Go for the shrimp and grits, order the grilled vegetables, and the broiled (not fried) crab cake and the lemon pepper wings. A remarkable experience. Not as cheap as it looks, but this is your best shot at great soul food.

I wouldn't go out of my way for Birch and Barley or for Union Market. Rose's Luxury is a highly pleasant experience if you are willing to go early and wait in line, especially on a weekday. No reservations.

Why Chinese cuisines/dishes do not include raw vegetables...

It is possible, but it isn't so. Your experiences have nothing to do with China, I'm afraid. The vegetables taste great and have no metallic flavor. In restaurants they are cooked at very high temperature, very quickly. A stir fry of morning glory greens takes only a few seconds in the wok with only some oil and garlic. The taste shines through and is not masked with cloying sauce.

If you were to go to a 'wet market' in Beijing, you would be in a land of plenty with a great supply of fresh vegetables that taste great. The big difference is that you would not recognize most of what you see by living in the US or Europe, and the experience can be a daunting one. Some may not look very clean.

There is nothing wrong with their sytem of producing and supplying agricultural products. I cannot speak for Hong Kong, though. As far as this thread is concerned, it is really not an issue.

Nov 17, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Acre 121 in Columbia Heights - Report

Looking for brunch with geographic and visiting family limitations, we tried this spot which touts their low country cooking and barbecue.

I didn't trust the bbq, so I gravitated to the pulled pork hash described as carnitas on the menu. They have no idea what carnitas is, except as a catch-all phrase for any roast pork. Their veggie burger was put through the deflavorizing machine.

This place is a sports bar with zero emphasis on the kitchen. It looks dreary, the food looks and tastes dreary, and I wish I had gone somewhere else.

Why Chinese cuisines/dishes do not include raw vegetables...

Yes, and I am sure black pepper and ginger are too. Longtime associated with health giving properties in many cultures.

Nov 16, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Why Chinese cuisines/dishes do not include raw vegetables...

Hulba has been made in Yemen for many years, though I don't know the entire history of this foam condiment:

http://www.shebayemenifood.com/spices...

Or did you think foam was a modern invention?

Nov 16, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Saba, Yemeni Food in Fairfax - Report

Eight Chowhounds got together to test out the Yemeni food at this new restaurant in Fairfax.

The menu seemed limited. There were three dishes served on a bed of seasoned rice and crisped onions. One was hanith, a savory roast lamb, and the other two were listed as mandi; one was a roast chicken and the other a boiled lamb shank, which came out rather plain. I probably liked the chicken best.

Then there were two similar stews. One was salta, a beef stew that came out bubbling over dramatically in a stone pot with a generous helpng of hulba on top. Hulba is a whipped fenugreek condiment. For anyone who thinks that Ferran Adria created foam dishes, they have another thing coming. Hulba is the original foam. But they really used a lot of fenugreek, and it was bitter. Good for fans of bitter! The other stew was vegetables only, served in the same manner. It wasn't as satisfying.

They started us off with a lemony salad, and we ordered maraq, a lamb broth.

The restaurant has an extensive list of breakfast dishes (they open at 10am) which they do not serve the rest of the day, but we were able to order a shredded bread dish with dates and honey that is normally for breakfast. This was a big bowl of sweet and chewy bread. Not all that good.

My other experience eating yemeni food iss at Al Jazera in the Skyline area of Falls Church. I've been there several times. It's a bigger menu. Although lamb is hardly their strong suit, I have to say I like it much better. Plus it's cheaper.

This is the report from 2010 (not that long ago!) about Al Jazera:

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/6840...

Why Chinese cuisines/dishes do not include raw vegetables...

Yeah, I can think of a couple of salads I had in Beijing. But it seems the exception, which is beside the point. Being served fresh leafy greens to wrap bbq and other items is commonplace in Korea.

Nov 16, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Why Chinese cuisines/dishes do not include raw vegetables...

There was never any question of 'main event' in the OP. The question was simply about inclusion. And neither climate nor geography explain it. Raw radish, onion, carrot, garlic, and various leafy greens find their way into Asian cuisines. You are the one saying they have limited appeal. I think they have broad appeal, as evidenced in Asian cuisine including non-tropical Korea and places just across the border from China.

Nov 15, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Do certain menu items put you off going to a restaurant?

Chicken International Dateline.

Nov 15, 2014
Steve in General Topics
1

Why Chinese cuisines/dishes do not include raw vegetables...

Carrots and onions are not tropical. The thread is not about types of vegetables, but if they are regularly served raw.

For example, Koreans will eat garlic raw - served on the side of a gamyetang as condiment or as part of a wrap. Lots of raw garlic in Korea, but I don't remember being served raw garlic in China.

Then there is also kimbap.

I think you are going to have to give up on your theory. Too many holes.

Nov 15, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Do you have to wait til food cools completely before refrigerating?

You do want to cool food rapidly, but putting a big pot of hot stew (for example) in a fridge will not necessarily do the trick. The problem comes when the interior of the stew does not cool to 41 degrees within six hours. This may be more of a problem in professional kitchens where they deal in big quantities. To cool rapidly and safely, they transfer to shallow containers and use a variety of other methods to cool before putting it into the fridge. At home this may not be a problem at all, but it is a big issue in professional food service. This is where the confusion comes in.

Nov 15, 2014
Steve in General Topics