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50 Comfort Foods for 50 States

What, no herring?

about 2 hours ago
Steve in General Topics

Chocolate: What do you look for?

I do not care at all about single origin. Too many bad ones out there. Also, I am not concerned with social responsibility in food, any manufacure will do.

I much prefer dark chocolate(about 65%) add-ins always welcome, though whole or chopped nuts are usually too rough and ruin the smoothness for me. Adore salt, salt caramel, praline with a bit of crunch, quite a few fruit flavors, mint, herbs, or nut pastes.

New creations always welcome! Savory is good.

about 2 hours ago
Steve in General Topics
1

Why don't I see Golden TileFish in stores?

Golden tilefish is Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps. Golden is also known as: Golden bass, Golden snapper, Great northern tilefish, and Rainbow tilefish.

There are many different kinds of tilefish.

I see fresh, whole tilefish periodically in Asian supermarkets.

http://www.fishwatch.gov/seafood_prof...

http://fishbase.sinica.edu.tw/ComName...

about 6 hours ago
Steve in General Topics

Shawafel -- Best Inexpensive Food in the Atlas District

I returned to Shawafel for the baba ganoush and the tabbouleh. The baba ganoush is excellent with a gorgeous smokey background, and the tabbouleh had a really nice flavor this time. Perhaps it had a bit more time to marinate. I will go back for more items.

about 15 hours ago
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Possible Double Standard Regarding Dietary Needs/Preferences

This subject has already been beaten to death. I personally have no problem preparing a meal with about four components that could cover just about all known restrictions. I ask first.

1 day ago
Steve in Not About Food

Top 100 ranking at the moment all categories in Tokyo at Tabelog

Hey, there is a Japanese restaurant in the top ten! Will wonders never cease?

1 day ago
Steve in Japan

Toki Underground is an awesome little place

Kimchi ramen here is da bomb. I wish could say the same for the others. Have not tried the vegetarian.

1 day ago
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

How do the French get their food?

Thanks for the reply. Does the weak produce apply even if its in season?

1 day ago
Steve in France

How do the French get their food?

I'd like to find out about the fruit in a French supermarket (I can't remember the last time I bought fruit at one). Is it like in the US? Hard peaches, pears, plums, and tomatoes that don't ripen properly?

Jul 28, 2014
Steve in France

Any recent experiences at Bob's Noodle 66 (Taiwanese)?

Yeah, I think this could be my next one. Got to get you Maryland folks more active.

Jul 28, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Any recent experiences at Bob's Noodle 66 (Taiwanese)?

I have not eaten at the Bob's Noodle 66 (not the Shanghai version) in Rockville since they reopened/relocated. I stopped in once for takeout taiwanese hamburgers which were still very, very good. This used to be a primo Chowhound find and the site of many a successful group meal.

Any recent experiences - or at least since the move?

Jul 28, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

How do the French get their food?

If folks stopped buying those rock hard peaches in the supermarket, they wouldn't carry them. Nobody has to eat peaches, they aren't a staple.

My household is a perfect microcosm of this. My wife wants to buy peaches when she wants to buy them, and the fact they taste terrible doesn't matter to her. I wait for summer and go to the fruit stands. I can go most of the year without eating peaches; I'm ok with that. My wife and most of the mainstream food shoppers will put up with lousy summer peaches to be able to get lousy peaches year round.

Jul 27, 2014
Steve in France

How do the French get their food?

"Good food costs more money than cardboard crap."

The prices in the regular supermarkets near me are sky high. Like I said before, people will pay a premium for theose gorgeous looking rocks.

I can get lower prices and better produce at the Asian superstores.

Jul 27, 2014
Steve in France

How do the French get their food?

Generations of Americans now expect peaches to be in the in store year round. They have little idea of seasons or that the peaches should taste different in the summer.

Jul 27, 2014
Steve in France

Hamburger buns in Nova/DC

I don't agree with your first statement. The bun doesn't matter if the hamburger isn't seared crusty on the outside, red and juicy on the inside.

What's wrong with the challah hamburger buns at Whole Foods (if that's the sort of thing you like)? Toast 'em up and you're good to go.

Jul 27, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

How do the French get their food?

"Again, I ask, how do the French ACTUALLY do it?"

I don't think there is any magic to it. It starts with obtaining varieties of fruit whose chief characteristic is deliciousness. Has to be grown that way in the first place. They get the fruit from whatever source they can. Oranges from Spain, many tropical fruits from Africa, other fruit from France and around the EU. Geographically, it's all pretty close quite frankly.

In the US this week we bought some peaches from the supermarket and from a market stand about an hour outside the city on the way to the beach. The supermarket peaches were so hard you could hammer nails with them. After about five days, they were finallly soft enought to eat but they had dried up inside. Right in the middle of peach season!

The peaches at the fruit stand were totally ready to eat right then, and exploded in juiciness. They are not the same peach in the first place. It's not magic. A complex infrastructure had to be created to get that supermarket peach into our grubby little hands. I guess because at some point in the past, the US consumer rejected the juicy and seasonally available but imperfect looking peach in preference for the beautiful papier maché version, available year round, grown on purpose to look great first and for most. We were (and still are) willing to pay top dollar - it is not at all about saving money- for this privilege.

Although it is not fruit, here is what happens with Maryland crabs (which I think is a similar story): supply is inconsistent, so crab houses here have to go further afield. Those suppliers want to sell to them year round, so they insist on purchasing levels 12 months of the year. Voila, they are serving Texas crabs even when Maryland crabs are available. So you are sitting in a restaurant in Maryland, built on a dock overlooking the Chesapeake Bay where crabs are swimming - maybe even right in front of you - and you are eating crabs from Texas and crabcakes made from Vietnamese crab. And you are paying 'market' prices.

Jul 27, 2014
Steve in France

How do the French get their food?

The fruit in a US Supermarket is sold rock hard. It looks beautiful. Gorgeous, ruby red tomatoes, perfectly shaped. Prettily shaded peaches. Pears, plums, and strawberries that survive unblemished the rigors of transportation. The US consumer will reach for that tomato in the supermarket that looks beautiful and will pay a premium for that. There is no expectation from the consumer they will be able to eat it anytime soon after purchase. And they expect to have the fruit available throughout the year, no matter the season. These fruit will never ripen properly.

In all those little neighborhood or village markets in France, the fruit is ready to eat, from my experience, and the French expect it to be ripe.

In order to satisfy these different expectations, the fruit has to be a different variety from the beginning.

Just like all those 'food service' tomatoes at a fast food place are a different variety. Nobody cares what they look like unsliced. The consumer dos not see them whole and does not pay extra for them, so they have to be as cheap as possible, are usually pink, and cannot be juicy or will be too messy to slice and serve. They will lose product on the floor.

Jul 27, 2014
Steve in France
1

Bryan Voltaggio’s Lunchbox Opens in Friendship Heights Today 7/14/14

I guess the title of the thread threw me off; the date is wrong. Did you wind up going? How was your lunch?

Jul 25, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Irish Inn, Glen Echo (July 2014)

Who know that blackened tilapia and fish tacos are so popular in Ireland?

Jul 25, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Recommended Japanese dishes for pescatarian with a milk allergy

As I've posted before, a terrific Japanese dish mostly not found in the US is himono, grilled dried fish. Best to seek out a place that specializes in it. I don't have a personal rec for you, though.

Here is one place rated highly by Tabelog, an exhaustive restaurant site, but not in English:

http://tabelog.com/tokyo/A1304/A13040...

Although it is in Japanese, you can glean a lot of info such as location, specific menu items (and how they are written in Japanese), photos, hours, almost everything you need to know.

Jul 25, 2014
Steve in Japan

Why is there no fresh guanabana in the US?

I called the Fresh World in Springfield. The woman who answered said they "very rarely" get any. I will be onthe lookout. I know in Florida it is available near the end of June from local growers only, but I don't know where they'd get it from up here.

Jul 24, 2014
Steve in General Topics

E**a's Wood Fired Pizza

If you get a pizza without tomato sauce, it's not so bad. That way, it's just the crust which is seriously disappointing and tastes like a stale english muffin. A plain cheese, margherita, or tomato pie, though, is going to be awful. I don't think I can name a lousier pizza. Can you?

Jul 22, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

KFC ~ Bon Chon Etc

Thousand Island dressing served on a cabbage-only slaw is popular in Korea as a match with fried chicken, but can sometimes appear as part of the banchan at other meals.

Jul 22, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

E**a's Wood Fired Pizza

It's been so long since I've had matchbox pizza. When I did have it, I thought it was not bad. Nothing I felt compelled to order again. I do very much like their mini-burgers ordered no more than medium rare, and I've had them a bunch of times.

Jul 21, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Quarterdeck, first visit (July 2014)

Just looked up my post from last year. The price was $75 per dozen in Baltimore, and those were very large crabs.

Jul 21, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Quarterdeck, first visit (July 2014)

Glad to hear it was a good experience for you. I guess the price has skyrocketed this year..... haven't had crabs since last year. Aside form crabs, it is actually worth eating here for the mesquite shrimp. I imagine it's with a brush-on liquid, but it's a damn good order. Wouldn't really come here for the other menu items.

Jul 21, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

E**a's Wood Fired Pizza

It's right across form a metro stop, and the pizza here Yelps well.

Jul 21, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

E**a's Wood Fired Pizza

It's late on a Sunday night, and District of Pi has already closed their upstairs and can't accomodate an impromptu group of fifteen. But guess who can?

Yep, after eleven years I had my return visit to Ella's. The crust is still crappy, the tomato sauce like from a bad jar. Worse, though, is that this pizza is also too expensive. Great location, but an insult to food.

Jul 20, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

What do I do with bananas?

I've bought a 40 lb case before. Slice and freeze. Put in a blender for banana smoothies anytime.

Jul 17, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Best lunch spots near Newseum and Library of Congress for Meat AND Vegan eaters???

Jaleo for Spanish tapas, near the Newseum, is the best place in DC for vegans. Vegans can enjoy:
Garlic mushrooms, grilled asparagus with romesco sauce, spinach with raisins, cauliflower with dates, baby wrinkled potatoes, beet salad with citrus (ask them to put the cheese on the side), and grilled bread with tomato.

In addition, the patatas bravas (aioli served on the side) can be ordered, but only if the vegan in question doesn't mind that it is deep fried in the same oil as non-vegan items.

For others, the best dishes include all of the above plus the mini-hamburguesa made from iberico ham and the quail with rosemary sauce. Also consider the cod fritters, dates wrapped in bacon, and the sausage wrapped in potato.

Not far from there is Daikaya for ramen. So many people say the vegan ramen is their best version. I haven't tried it, but I have very much enjoyed their miso ramen. This is a true ramen-ya, so not much else on the menu. If you see a wait, it won't last long.

Jul 17, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore