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E**a's Wood Fired Pizza

If you get a pizza without tomato sauce, it's not so bad. That way, it's just the crust which is seriously disappointing and tastes like a stale english muffin. A plain cheese, margherita, or tomato pie, though, is going to be awful. I don't think I can name a lousier pizza. Can you?

about 13 hours ago
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

KFC ~ Bon Chon Etc

Thousand Island dressing served on a cabbage-only slaw is popular in Korea as a match with fried chicken, but can sometimes appear as part of the banchan at other meals.

about 13 hours ago
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

E**a's Wood Fired Pizza

It's been so long since I've had matchbox pizza. When I did have it, I thought it was not bad. Nothing I felt compelled to order again. I do very much like their mini-burgers ordered no more than medium rare, and I've had them a bunch of times.

1 day ago
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Quarterdeck, first visit (July 2014)

Just looked up my post from last year. The price was $75 per dozen in Baltimore, and those were very large crabs.

1 day ago
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Quarterdeck, first visit (July 2014)

Glad to hear it was a good experience for you. I guess the price has skyrocketed this year..... haven't had crabs since last year. Aside form crabs, it is actually worth eating here for the mesquite shrimp. I imagine it's with a brush-on liquid, but it's a damn good order. Wouldn't really come here for the other menu items.

2 days ago
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

E**a's Wood Fired Pizza

It's right across form a metro stop, and the pizza here Yelps well.

2 days ago
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

E**a's Wood Fired Pizza

It's late on a Sunday night, and District of Pi has already closed their upstairs and can't accomodate an impromptu group of fifteen. But guess who can?

Yep, after eleven years I had my return visit to Ella's. The crust is still crappy, the tomato sauce like from a bad jar. Worse, though, is that this pizza is also too expensive. Great location, but an insult to food.

Jul 20, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

What do I do with bananas?

I've bought a 40 lb case before. Slice and freeze. Put in a blender for banana smoothies anytime.

Jul 17, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Best lunch spots near Newseum and Library of Congress for Meat AND Vegan eaters???

Jaleo for Spanish tapas, near the Newseum, is the best place in DC for vegans. Vegans can enjoy:
Garlic mushrooms, grilled asparagus with romesco sauce, spinach with raisins, cauliflower with dates, baby wrinkled potatoes, beet salad with citrus (ask them to put the cheese on the side), and grilled bread with tomato.

In addition, the patatas bravas (aioli served on the side) can be ordered, but only if the vegan in question doesn't mind that it is deep fried in the same oil as non-vegan items.

For others, the best dishes include all of the above plus the mini-hamburguesa made from iberico ham and the quail with rosemary sauce. Also consider the cod fritters, dates wrapped in bacon, and the sausage wrapped in potato.

Not far from there is Daikaya for ramen. So many people say the vegan ramen is their best version. I haven't tried it, but I have very much enjoyed their miso ramen. This is a true ramen-ya, so not much else on the menu. If you see a wait, it won't last long.

Jul 17, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

French food - boring? Yes, according to the Daily Telegraph

Not many miles separate Cornwall from Brittany, but I have a pretty clear idea which place I'd rather be to get something good to eat.

Jul 17, 2014
Steve in France
3

Southern-style pralines

Please describe what you are looking for.

Jul 16, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

The Mall and Visitors

If you are near the Lincoln memorial, it's a significant walk to anything. Most people walking all day will be in 'taxi' territory by that point. Bob Kinkead opened up a new pizza and sandwich trattoria in the Watergate complex called Campono. I think it's counter service, but I haven't been yet:

http://camponodc.com

Very closest is probably Sizzling Express at 23rd and E Sts.

Jul 16, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

French food - boring? Yes, according to the Daily Telegraph

I agree, Pti, that this is an odd statement. But I don't think you have to go back 40 years!

I traveled mostly in provincial France from 1984 to 1999, and I found at the very least the breads, cheeses, and seasonal produce to be of very high quality. I've had an impressive number of memorable meals in rather ordinary surroundings.

I suppose I just got lucky, but this was a typical experience: we arrived in Ambert from getting off the plane in Lyon, right in the middle of lunch. Despite the lively festival going on, the place was like a ghost town except for the clinking of silverware and small chatter, mostly coming from private residences it seemed. We walked into a 'bar lyonnais' and they asked us if we would like to have 'their lunch.' Curious, we sat down and they proceeded to bring us a big bowl of tomato salad with lardons. Then followed a platter of haricots vert sizzling with garlic, pommes frites, and another platter of roast beef, bubbling with pools of fat, the thinly sliced browned meat draping over the edges of the platter. Fresh fruit and nuts for dessert. Near our table was a road construction crew on break. As we made our way from auvergne through provence, the cote d'azur and on to Italy, this scenario played out multiple times, whether it was eating at a health food shop in Menton or on a farm in Provence, or even cooking ourselves in a gite from produce brought at the market. When we got to Italy, there was a bit of culture shock as the prices went up and so did the austerity. Unelss you had a lot of money to spend, the same amount of dollars for that lunch in Ambert got us a green salad and some average pizza. The tomatoes (with lardons in auvergne, with tuna on the cote d'azur) transformed into a bowl of undressed lettuce the moment we settled down near Portofino.

This held mostly true for future trips to le pays catalan, la thierache, champagne, and lorraine, the huate-savoie, burgundy, normandie and the marais poitevin. We were faced with carefully prepared micro-regional cuisine, whether it was sourced from a traiteur, market, or restaurant. When we cooked for ourseleves, the selection at the market was impressive.

I do have to say when we visited my co-worker's father in Prades (he with a raspy, weathered voice, wearing a beret), he carefully took out a pocket knife, sliced off a piece of baguette ...and pronounced it inferior to what he used to get. This was right before we all went out mushroom hunting in a nearby forest.

Jul 16, 2014
Steve in France
2

What foods unavailable in US not to miss in France?

I had very delicious ones from a fruit stand in the 11th near Nation. Might have been at the weekly outdoor market where I also had some good manakish. I doubt they had any kind of special supply.....

I think you can get supremely juicy, soft, ripe, and fragrant white peaches in so many places in France. This would be an extreme rarity in the US where we don't get that many, and the ones we do get ripen poorly.

Jul 16, 2014
Steve in France

Four Sisters Grill (Clarendon)

Four Sisters Grill is not as fast as ShopHouse (the Asian Chipotle), but it is still very quick and miles better. It is aiming at the quick lunch crowd, and it serves that crowd well.

Jul 16, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore
1

What foods unavailable in US not to miss in France?

There is also reblochonnade, yet another cheese and potato dish of the Haute-Savoie. If you want to eat nothing but cheese and potato for a week at a time, you could do that in the Savoie and still not eat every variation.

Jul 15, 2014
Steve in France

Affogato in NoVa/DC?

NGA gelato is surprisingly good considering where you are, but otherwise not.

Jul 15, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

What are Your Favorite Foods and Where, Anywhere in the World, Do You Get it.

I think all of Chowhound is dedicated to this question.

I can't say I've specifically had the 'pasta bolognese' at Filomena's (correct spelling), but I live in the DC area, and I find it curious you would name anything from here one of the best things you've ever eaten. Such are the vagaries of life, I guess.

For my part I will list five dishes that are damn good no matter where you find them. Some places are better than others, and a very good one is heavenly, but even an ok version is pretty much fantastic:

Burmese Ginger Salad. I've never had one I didn't love, but the version at Myanmar in Falls Church, VA is one great cheap thrill.

Nam Khao (aka Rice Ball Salad) The Lao version of this dish always pleases and impresses everyone I've introduced it to. It's consistently at least great, but the version at Bangkok Golden (Lao Menu) is bliss.

Daing Na Bangus, marinated milkfish. This is a Filipino dish. I've had quite a few different variations, from cold in a salad to hot and crispy out of the fryer, and it is always delicious. My favorite version is at Fairfax Inn in Falls Church, VA, which is a lunch counter in a medical office building now run by a Filipino family.

Carolina Shrimp and Grits. It's always pretty damn good, but the version at Oohhs and Aahhs in DC is killer. Soul Food heaven.

Jamaican Oxtail Brown Stew. You can mess up oxtail, but a 'classy' operation should be able to knock this out of the park. Pimento Grill is a carry out in DC with a few seats, and is a very classy operation. Fantastic sauce.

Jul 15, 2014
Steve in General Topics

What foods unavailable in US not to miss in France?

I'll add white peaches in the summer which are better in France than the US, and also fresh figs. Tomato salad should be ubiquitous in the countryside. Farcement (aka farci savoyard), which is a savory cake of potato, prunes, dried fruit: the kind of thing you might find in a traiteur, though I am not sure if this is found in the lower elevations like Annecy.

Jul 15, 2014
Steve in France

When a recipe calls for 'chili sauce,' what do you use?

"Chili Sauce should have the same meaning no matter what or where the recipe originates."

A chili sauce that originates in China will probably not taste the same as one that originates in Peru. Though a chaufa dish might bridge the gap. I recommend experimenting.

Jul 15, 2014
Steve in General Topics

DC Weekend - Those Fried Green Tomatoes ...!

Thanks for your great report. I will put those fried green tomatoes at the top of my 'to-do' list!

Jul 14, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore
1

What foods unavailable in US not to miss in France?

Or just tell them at any serious fromagerie that you'd like to see cheeses that are 'liquide.' I'm sure you will find many types that are rarely seen in the US.

Jul 14, 2014
Steve in France

What foods unavailable in US not to miss in France?

Around Lac Annecy, many places that serve petite fritute du lac, tiny little fried fishies that you eat whole. Also dios, which are fat little sausages. Both delicious.

Jul 14, 2014
Steve in France

Ordering in a Chinese Restaurant (split from San Francisco board)

Two things:

First, you write as if you are unaware of the enormous difference between Japanese restaurants in Japan and those in the US. Substitute many other cusines in that sentence.

Second, your idea that they are 'shaming their culture' is interesting, but perhaps naive. The Chinese make food that adapts to wherever they are, so a Chinese-Korean restaurant featuring jja jiang mian is very different from Chinese-French, Chinese-Peruvian, and Chinese-American. The national dish of Peru, lomo saltado, is a chaufa dish with soy sauce as its 'secret' ingredient. That adaptation is part of their culture, too.

Jul 12, 2014
Steve in General Topics

Rum Buns

You are replying to someone who has only posted once ever on Chowhond in 2007. If you do a search in the Washington Post archives, you could probably find the recipe. They do charge a small fee for every article you print from the archives.

Jul 12, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

What's So Wrong About Not Lliking ..... ?

I grew up in a seafood averse household. The taste, smell, and texture were hideous to me. I couldn't imagine anything more gross.

Flash forward to many years later, and I can happily list many seafood dishes among the greatest things I've ever put in my mouth. Yeah, I now 'get' it.

I am 'sorry' for you because you like food enough to go an an internet food board, think and talk about food so much, and you are missing out on a convenient and sublime pleasure.

As for the rest of my family, I don't feel so sorry for them because they don't care enough to go on a food board and find out all about food.

"What IS so wrong about not liking something?"

In this case it is the fact that, in some cultures, this would be almost impossible. So you, a Chowhound, are letting your life circumstance stand in the way of so much convenient pleasure.

Jul 10, 2014
Steve in Not About Food

Thai Ghang Waan in Springfield, VA

The restaurant now provides a translated version of the Thai menu.
Here is a Chowhound dinner report:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/9749...

Jul 10, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Argentine Restaurants in DC or Northern VA

There used to be a couple of Argertine women selling very good empanadas at the Sunday street market in Adams Morgan (in the small triangular park in front of Churreria Madrid.) I have not been in a while, but I was impressed when I had them. Baked, not wet or oily, and full flavored.

Jul 10, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Argentine Restaurants in DC or Northern VA

Here is my report on El Patio in Rockville. Might be worth a look for the World Cup final, more for the people watching than the food:

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8704...

Jul 09, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore

Good Lebanese food in the DC area?

I will have to go back to Mount of Lebanon!

Jul 09, 2014
Steve in Washington DC & Baltimore