Caitlin McGrath's Profile

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What are you baking these days? October 2014 edition, part two!

My experience with baking with persimmons has been that if there are a lot of spices or other assertive flavors involved, the persimmon can easily get lost. They have a flavor that stands out on its own but not among a jumble of other things, to me.

about 1 hour ago
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking

What cookbooks have you bought lately or are you lusting after? October 2014 Edition.

I read, or rather, dipped in and out of, An Omelette and a Glass of Wine, a few years ago. Interesting essays on everything from the toll wartime and post-war rationing took on British cuisine to the simple pleasures of, wait for it!, an omelette and a glass of wine, and quite a bit in between. David is firm in her opinions and a treat to read.

Recipes from NY Times

A favorite, stovetop Chinese "roast" duck. Not difficult and really captures the flavor of Chinese deli roast duck. I've always done it with duck legs. Recommend cutting the sugar by half. Bonus: lots of lovely rendered duck fat.

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/17...

Also, roasted broccoli and shrimp, a great fast one-dish meal. I like to add mustard seeds and hold back some of the spice mixture to coat the shrimp as well as the broccoli. Leftovers are great cold.

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/10...

Q & A convert to discussion

I am also seeing this in iOS 7.

about 22 hours ago
Caitlin McGrath in Site Talk

What are you baking these days? September 2014, part 2! [old]

Yes, that is exactly what I did using the powdered buttermilk; then add the cocoa-water mixture alternately with the dry ingredients.

As to your pan size question, this is a big cake that really does fill a 12-cup bundt or tube pan. Because it's a pound cake with that typically dense texture, I think the best alternative would be to use a couple of loaf pans if you have them. If not, it should work in two 9-inch cake pans, provided they're not real shallow, or a springform and a smaller cake pan.

What are you baking these days? October 2014 edition, part two!

In the mood to bake something, I made the Eating Well spiced apple cider muffins that were discussed in the previous thread, as I had everything on hand (link is below). I skipped the streusel topping, reduced both the brown sugar and maple syrup by a couple of tablespoons (and upped the yogurt a bit to compensate in wet ingredients), used all whole-wheat pastry flour instead of an AP/WW combination, and added a diced Braeburn apple.

I like the flavor of the muffins (and the sweetness is right for me with the lesser amounts), but will try tinkering with the flavorings a bit next time. These have a lot of cinnamon, and I do really love cinnamon, but with the spice and the maple, these taste more like spice muffins with apple chunks than like apple muffins. These flavors are very complementary to apples, but here they're obscuring what the apple butter and cider contribute. Next time I'll skip or dramatically reduce the cinnamon, and maybe try all brown sugar, and compare.

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/spi...

What cookbooks have you bought lately or are you lusting after? October 2014 Edition.

The Dorie is being released at the end of this month, I believe. Ikaria came out last week, so I hope I'll be seeing it at some point! I haven't had troubles previously, either, but I haven't ordered anything since early this year, apparently preceding the problems.

What cookbooks have you bought lately or are you lusting after? October 2014 Edition.

I didn't know about Medrich's new book! She's completely reliable, always comes up with interesting recipes, Amazon has a quite extensive Look Inside feature.

October 2014 COTM "The Book of Jewish Food" reporting thread for recipes in the second half of 'The Sephardi World', pages 444-634.

Sciroppo di Vino (Wine Syrup), p. 624

I like making homemade syrups for cocktails and sodas and such, so when I noticed this recipe near the very end of the book, I was intrigued. It's red wine, sugar, lemon juice, lemon peel, and a bit of spice simmered into a syrup, and intended to flavor water. I thought, So...like a mulled wine soda? As it turns out, pretty much - but as it also turns out, a cold mulled wine soda is a good thing. Nicely flavored: Not too sweet, a bit tart, a bit complex, and a pretty color in the glass, to boot.

I made a half recipe, which for the record, made about 1 1/2 cups of syrup. I shorted the sugar by 1/4 cup on account of using Meyer lemon juice, which is sweeter and less acidic. The spices are meant to be a very few cloves and a cinnamon stick, but my cupboard was bare of cinnamon sticks; my sub of a few whole allspice berries was just dandy.

August 2014 COTM - Diana Henry: Pure Simple Cooking

Hmm, I had assumed the sour cream was an ingredient in the cake, but I just looked at the recipe and see it's in the frosting. I'm not sure I can recommend the yogurt sub with as much confidence in that situation, because yogurt can be finicky when heated. It might not be a problem with the double boiler set-up, but to be on the safe side you might not want to put it in with all the other ingredients, but rather stir it in after you've removed the bowl from over the heat.

August 2014 COTM - Diana Henry: Pure Simple Cooking

I haven't made this cake (yet), but I regularly sub Greek yogurt for sour cream in baked goods and it works just fine.

What are you baking these days? October 2014 edition, part two!

EYB index shows it in More Classic.

Oct 17, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking

9 Homemade Versions of Halloween Candy Classics

The secret to peppermint patties that have that "cool" sensation the York commercials riffed on is to use peppermint oil, not extract. The extract just doesn't do it.

Oct 16, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Features

October 2014 COTM "The Book of Jewish Food" reporting thread for recipes in 'The Ashkenazi World', pages 58-202.

Thanks!

Oct 16, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking

What are you baking these days? October 2014 edition, part two!

Brownies and blondies freeze well and, like CCC, are pretty much guaranteed crowd-pleasers.

Oct 15, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking
1

Top Chef Duels Finale (spoilers)

From the preview material available on Hulu (such as it is), I see that contestants include Mike Isabella's business partner and Michael Voltaggio's sous chef, so it seems likely they did recruiting through former contestants.

Cooking from wheelchair

That's a good strategy. A portable induction burner would be great for that, as long as you've got a few pans that are compatible (if a magnet sticks to the bottom, you're in business).

For a regular range, the oven is probably not possible to use independently. If you have space above your stove, you can get an angled mirror that helps you see what's going on in your pans: http://www.ezcaremedical.com/store/in...

October 2014 COTM "The Book of Jewish Food" reporting thread for recipes in 'The Ashkenazi World', pages 58-202.

Obviously you are doing not a thing wrong. I made my search because I was only familiar with doughs using cream cheese. We all now know there's a multiplicity. Where is your recipe from? If it's that good, I'd like to check it out.

October 2014 COTM "The Book of Jewish Food" reporting thread for recipes in the first half of 'The Sephardi World', pages 232-443.

Chittarnee (Sweet-and-Sour Chicken in Onion Sauce), p. 372

There's certainly irony in my having suggested elsewhere in this thread (or maybe it was the other Sephardi thread) that perhaps we shouldn't look to Roden for Indian recipes and then gone ahead and cooked one. But I must say, this one is a winner. Really good! I did take into account concerns about her low spice levels, so while I made a half recipe, I used the full measure of dry spices and more than the given full amounts of ginger and garlic, and I'm sure that made a difference.

Finely chopped or grated onions (I chopped, and if I were making the full recipe with 2 lbs onions, I'd probably use the food processor to chop or grate for time's sake) are gently cooked in a covered pan with occasional stirring until very soft. I started them too high and neglected them too long before stirring, so some bits got a little burnt, but the bitterness of those bits was tamed by the spices and the sweet and souring agents. When the onions have reached their very soft state, garlic, ginger, turmeric and ground cinnamon, coriander, and cardamom, plus cayenne and bay leaves, go in for a few minutes. Chunks of boneless chicken (I used thighs) and salt go in (she says for 10 minutes, I gave them about 5), then chopped fresh or canned tomatoes (I used canned). It is cooked uncovered for a half hour (I did this on very low heat), until the liquid's mostly gone, at which point wine vinegar (I used red) and a little sugar are added and it's cooked for another 10 minutes.

The result is not a saucy dish (and it's not meant to be). What it is, is delicious. Sweet and sour, and also complex and spicy (thanks to my generosity with the cayenne). I'll happily make and eat this again.

What cookbooks have you bought lately or are you lusting after? October 2014 Edition.

Eat Your Books, a digital index of your cookbook collection's contents (if you subscribe), but a great resource for viewing what recipes are in site-indexed books whether you own them or not, and whether you subscribe or not.

http://www.eatyourbooks.com/

Oct 14, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking

Nominations Thread: Cookbook of the Month November 2014

I could be interested in SOUL OF A NEW CUISINE.

Oct 13, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking

Nominations Thread: Cookbook of the Month November 2014

Thanks for stepping in, Mr. Nightshade, and please pass on to L best wishes for a speedy recovery and good eyesight!

October 2014 COTM "The Book of Jewish Food" reporting thread for recipes in 'The Ashkenazi World', pages 58-202.

Out of curiosity I checked my Eat Your Books library and found that every recipe in my personal collection includes cream cheese. A couple also include sour cream, but none have only sour cream.

Oct 13, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking

October 2014 COTM "The Book of Jewish Food" reporting thread for recipes in 'The Ashkenazi World', pages 58-202.

I have used this dough (the butter/cream cheese type) for little mini tartlets and it works well. You can just press it in the molds (or use a mini muffin tin). If you look up pecan tassie recipes, they often use the same dough as rugelach.

Oct 13, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking

What cookbooks have you bought lately or are you lusting after? October 2014 Edition.

June 2014 COTM, My Paris Kitchen: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/977518

What cookbooks have you bought lately or are you lusting after? October 2014 Edition.

Bon Appetit Y'all was also a COTM: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/648986

Oct 13, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking

What are you baking these days? October 2014 Edition, Part One [old]

It is from the Book of Jewish Food, by Claudia Roden, which is currently COTM, but I found it online here: http://www.cyber-kitchen.com/rfcj/CAK...

It's very different from typical spiced apple cakes made with oil - light and highlights the apples. Having made it as written, I'd add some vanilla to the batter next time.

What cookbooks have you bought lately or are you lusting after? October 2014 Edition.

It doesn't look like it. The last update to their business Facebook page was on May 30, and there are a bunch of (unanswered) posts asking if they went out of business, and one from someone saying she never received her order and could not get anyone on the phone to discuss it. I wonder what happened, that they wouldn't even make some kind of announcement.

Oct 12, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking

October 2014 COTM "The Book of Jewish Food" reporting thread for recipes in 'The Ashkenazi World', pages 58-202.

Yes, I do quite like it. Very different from other apple cakes, and I like its lightness and simplicity, which really highlights the apples.

Oct 12, 2014
Caitlin McGrath in Home Cooking

What are you baking these days? October 2014 Edition, Part One [old]

Apple sponge cake, with layers of sliced apples in the middle and on top, the top layer brushed with melted butter and sprinkled with cinnamon sugar before baking. By far the lightest apple cake I've made or eaten.