w

whiterabbit's Profile

Title Last Reply

Dan Tana's Equivalent in NY

I have a friend who has worked there for years - indofx - "Crispy" has been the captain to talk to for a lot of that time. The scene he described is a real particular one - serious a list types and locals, but not paparazzi - actually it's probably closer to Locanda - tribeca locals (anywhere from corporate to arts and everything in between) although Dan Tana's has a part that's like Rao's here - there are people who have standing reservations at Dan Tana. I agree with indofx, Carmine's has nothing to do with it. Carmine's is more like olive garden than it is like Dan Tana's.

Jul 13, 2010
whiterabbit in Manhattan

Gloves???

The rule by the Dept of Health is that there is to be no bare hand contact with prepared or ready to eat foods - this includes basil (in Dom's case) sushi, but also ice. Seeing a cook handle food in an Asian restaurant is by no means the most egregious or common violation you have ever seen by any means. Every bar you have walked into where you have seen a bartender handle a lime wedge, or pick up an olive to place on a skewer, or use a hand to remove an extra ice cube is in the same violation as touching a slice of ham with a bare hand, or a sushi roll. I have seen my local sushi restaurant go from bare hand to gloved hand only since the more stringent enforcement of these rules. The instances you detail here are all violations of the health code (either by direct contact with food or cross contamination with a gloved hand) and show that the training of the staff has been incomplete. If I were to tell you what happens out of sight at Nobu you would burn the building down.

-----
Nobu
105 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10013

Apr 08, 2010
whiterabbit in Manhattan

Late Night Nashville?

Coming into town for the Nashville film festival (at the regal green hills) and will be premiering a film that gets out at 11PM. We are staying at the Homewood suites downtown. I am sure that we will be starving, and prowling around downtown. As a bunch of excited New Yorkers we will be looking for a place to grab a drink and a bite. I know it's going to be a Tuesday, but it doesn't hurt to ask. A local hole in the wall with good bbq, or any hidden gem would be great, even if it's an otherwise unsavory place that has one standout thing worth getting.

Jo's on Elizabeth Street

Did you end up going?

Jul 01, 2009
whiterabbit in Manhattan

where, oh where has my butcher gone?

It's been two months since my local butcher shop closed (Kurowycky's on First ave) and I have been trying to deal with Whole Foods, but the prices are killing me - Chinatown is great for everything else, but the only beef I am going to find there is flank steak. Where to you go to get a decent cut of meat in the LES/East Village?

Aug 06, 2007
whiterabbit in Manhattan

Japanese pubs around St. Marks??

Another vote for Village Yokocho. Grilled sardines = delicious. Cocktails after at Angel's Share...BigJeff and I are in the same boat with Kasadela - the sake list just kills you. I went the other day, had beer, and twice as much food, and the bill was much more agreeable.

Jun 17, 2007
whiterabbit in Manhattan

NYC Vacay: Need a great place for Dinner!

Wow. We are going to need more to go on than that. Most restaurants in New York have a variety in terms of fish, meat, seafood, but very few restaurants I like have expansive menus - the best places specialize in a type of cuisine. Start off with where you are from, and any food aversions/allergies, and what you've tried already.

Jun 17, 2007
whiterabbit in Manhattan

Why don't you eat in Chinatown?

There is definitely some negativity in the setup of the question (I hope it didn't seem like I was trying to hide it) but that's what I am curious about. As someone who is part of the Chinese American community (but raised outside of Chinatown) I have asked the very same questions that I have asked here and been met with a lot of responses that were not nearly as thought out as the ones received here. A lot of the most negative things I have heard about restaurants in Chinatown I have heard from those that live there, and were raised there. It is something I don't hear from friends who were brought up going to K-Town, or other friends with Thai or Filipino backgrounds.

I think that the majority of people that read this board tend to be very open minded, adventurous, and supportive of restaurants that may, however temporarily, find themselves on the culinary frontier. We are all the better for it. I ask this question here because I think that it is those that have the greatest openness whom provide the greatest insight into those who lack it.

When I ask about what might have some broader appeal, I don't mean that the food should be dumbed down, only that it becomes popular, or popular enough to sustain itself. I don't think the two are necessarily mutually exclusive.

About "anchors", though is that regardless of whether or not a geographical area is associated with a particular style of food (whether it be ethnicity or level of service, the Alice Waters treatment, etc) there can be a place that "anchors" that draw to the area. For instance, I can believe that Marco Canora's Hearth influenced David Chang's choice of first avenue for Momofuku.

Thanks again, this has been very enlightening.

btw, financialdistrictresident, I have never had the potatos with spun sugar, but there used to be a guy on bowery near pell who spun sugar into a fine coccoon around a nut and caramel bar, for a treat my father called "dragon whiskers" which sounds like a relative of what you are looking for.

Jun 16, 2007
whiterabbit in Manhattan

Why don't you eat in Chinatown?

Thanks for all of your great responses - i think that BigJeff may have misinterpreted what I had to say, the question of broader appeal is not about diluting anything - in a way you answered the question the roundabout way - many of the restaurants in Chinatown try to do too many things, or are not specialized enough with what they do to be identified. The reason why I used the three places as an example that I did (noodletown, joe's, and Peking Duck) are that they all have a specialty, one that customers can identify with.

As for long lines and bustling business, I think that the reality is very different. The fact is, that, like KTinyc said. "it's so crowded no one goes there anymore" rings true. Dim sum is certainly busy, but brings an average of $9 per person in a very labor intensive and competitive segment. If you walk through Chinatown at 8pm on a recent Thursday say, there are many restaurants with a scarcity of customers (I am sure a fair share of those by good reason) and if business has bounced back so well (after sars scares and 9/11) why do there continue to be initiatives?

next part of the question - when you eat in Chinatown, do you just expect bad/rude service, or does hope spring eternal?

Jun 16, 2007
whiterabbit in Manhattan

Why don't you eat in Chinatown?

Chinatown is certainly growing in size, and certainly people have their faves (Joe's Shanghai, Peking Duck House, Noodletown, etc) but it doesn't seem that there has been a "hit" in Chinatown (a place with broader appeal) for a while. What is it that keeps you from trying the 100 other restaurants in Chinatown, or going more often? Pet peeves, gripes, xenophobia, let 'em fly...Or what's missing?

Jun 14, 2007
whiterabbit in Manhattan

Gertel's closing June 22

No kidding, that's a long trip to get my marble cake. Been going there off and on for 35 years.

Jun 14, 2007
whiterabbit in Manhattan

good east village date?

lavagna is the move, cozy, easy staff, great wines to impress, or just by the glass. Supper's no slounch either, and to make a third I would say il Bagatto. My fave would still be lavagna.

May 23, 2007
whiterabbit in Manhattan

Una Pizza Napoletana - Steer Clear

Just wanted to jump in on the UPN bashing train. So true. I went there three times (I know, a little masochistic) over the span of a year to find pretty much the same thing. Good food, bad attitude. Why did I go back? I appreciate the purist approach. But there is nothing pure about not appreciating your guests.

May 22, 2007
whiterabbit in Manhattan