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Japanese Yamada Woks...?

Does anyone know of anyone (fine Japanese goods) that carries the hand hammered Yamada woks from Japan?

They make a hand hammered flat bottomed wok that is just PERFECT for electrical stoves, but I can't find anyone in Japan willing to ship,and some Japanese sellers only sell the rounded bottomed Yamadas on Ebay...?

Apr 16, 2014
toddster63 in Los Angeles Area

Yamada Woks...?

Thanks so much--great ideas. I tried them both and they only carry cheapo Chinese woks... Still don't understand why is it so hard to find high end Japanese goods in the Bay Area...? L.A. isn't overflowing, but has a much better selection than NorCal...!

Apr 16, 2014
toddster63 in San Francisco Bay Area

Yamada Woks...?

Does anyone know anywhere in the bay area to buy hand made Japanese Yamada woks? They make a great hand hammered flat bottomed wok, and would love to find a supplier of luxury Japanese cookware in the bay area that carries them...?

Apr 15, 2014
toddster63 in San Francisco Bay Area

Hand Hammered Wok from E-Wok Review

Yes, I'm a big Hom fan too... Not too many Americans are familiar with him, which is a shame. His documentary of modern China and it's changing cuisine from a few years ago with Ching-He Huang was truly as they called it a culinary adventure. I don't think PBS ever showed it in the US, but you can watch it on YouTube... We are more familar with Ching-He Huang and her shows on Cooking Channel here in the US, and I greatly enjoy her as well. She has the same up attitude as Hom and just makes me smile...!

I love my stainless wok for steaming (mainly to make Chow Fun noodles from scratch), but I could never stir fry in it--the extra flavor (or wok hei) that the carbonized surface of seasoned steel/iron has just become too crucial to my taste buds. I even fry exclusively in my DeBuyer steel skillets now--eggs, fish... The stainless is good to steam rice in, though, or make oatmeal...

Mar 24, 2014
toddster63 in Cookware

Hand Hammered Wok from E-Wok Review

The gauge of the steel really is kinda dependent on your heat source. Those thicker 14 gauge woks from the Wok Shop (made in the USA), have a thick padding of steel on the bottom that really holds heat, and for weaker electrical stoves, it can really make all the difference. I tried to use a Ken Hom flat bottom wok that was not thicker with padded steel on the bottom (it was stamped from one uniform sheet of 1.5mm steel), and I was shocked at how fast it cooled down when moderately loaded on my electrical coil stove--much weaker performance the the thick padded bottomed USA made woks the Wok Shop sells...!

Mar 24, 2014
toddster63 in Cookware

Hand Hammered Wok from E-Wok Review

Boy, that makes two of us! Still drives me nuts that I never got one of the flat bottomed E-Woks--those were great and so unique. The closest I have found to them are the Yamada woks from Japan, hand made/hammered and very flat (more like a Peking pan really), but pricey ($100) and hard to find...

Mar 22, 2014
toddster63 in Cookware

Hand Hammered Wok from E-Wok Review

It's a decent stamped and then pounded a few times for artistic effect kinda wok--what we used to call hand hammered before artisians like e-woks should us what TRUE hand hammered woks were like...

What I never liked about the $30 WS flat bottom is the flat bottom is SO SMALL! Like 3"-4"! It would do okay over gas, but forget this one on electric, induction or halogen stoves...!

Mar 22, 2014
toddster63 in Cookware

Hand Hammered Wok from E-Wok Review

Good wok you bought--very thick steel, holds the heat.

I recommend investing in an Ove Glove, or a good oven mitt, as those "elephant ear" handles can get HOT!

I love my well seasoned cantonese wok, with the large "hammer marks" and elephant ears--it looks the part SO well, but I hate having to find the glove to touch it when cooking or serving...!

My primary wok has become the Wok Shop one you ordered, in the heavy steel, with the classic "American" long wooden handle and helper wooden handle on the other side. The flat bottom has become warped (probably due to being used outside on the high temp propane burner), but it still does an admirable job on the electric coil stove (probably because the coils are warped-ish themselves!). All in all, a very versatile wok.

The bowl design on this wok, with any of it's different handle configurations, has been around for some time, and I think they are still making them right here in the Bay area--Oakland, maybe? I really like the "feel" of this wok's design--just high enough, and even with the perfect sized flat bottom on the flat bottom model, this wok is a pleasure to toss food around in; it feels just about right, fluid like a wok should. I've used some flat bottom woks that lost this feel--that magical dance of the food that is so prevalent in round bottom woks--but this wok's design in the flat bottom model really preserves so much of a wok's fluid moving magic...

Mar 21, 2014
toddster63 in Cookware

Hand Hammered Wok from E-Wok Review

...and they are out of stock until June of this year (2014)

(Williams Sonoma Artisan Wok)

Mar 21, 2014
toddster63 in Cookware

carbon wok, what is step 1

Okay, I am very experienced with carbon steel and woks, and just purchased the Asian Fusion Stir Fry Pan from BB&B (which is a GREAT 12" wok!!), and wow--the lacquer coating was quite intense. They said to remove with steel wool soap pads and that did indeed removed a lot of the lacquer, but not all of it...

What did remove it all was to unscrew the bamboo handle from the wok, and then bake the lacquered wok for 30 minutes in a 500F oven. The lacquer vaporizes off (with almost no odor), and the steel turns a light gold. It comes out all ready for seasoning!

If you can't remove the wood/bamboo handles, I have also done this is the past by wrapping the handles in wet paper towels and then foil over the paper towels. This method can affect the finsih of the varnish on the wood somewhat, but no worse for wear.

Another issue I have noticed with some woks (Helen and Joyce Chen woks always do this) is that the high all over temps from being in the oven expand and contract the rivets that hold the handle holder to the wok, permanently changing their size, and therefore the handle will never be "factory tight" again--still fine to use and some will be barely notice, but the very slight wiggle of the handle drives me nuts...! I like my pans and woks ROCK hard and ultra steady!

But again, the high temp bake is a really easy and simple way to remove those stupid lacquer coatings from carbon steel pans and woks.

Mar 18, 2014
toddster63 in Cookware

Need help with seasoning new wok -- tough plasticy coating?

Okay, I am very experienced with carbon steel and woks, and just purchased the Asian Fusion Stir Fry Pan from BB&B (which is a GREAT 12" wok!!), and wow--the lacquer coating was quite intense. They said to remove with steel wool soap pads and that did indeed removed a lot of the lacquer, but not all of it...

What did remove it all was to unscrew the bamboo handle from the wok, and then bake the lacquered wok for 30 minutes in a 500F oven. The lacquer vaporizes off (with almost no odor), and the steel turns a light gold. It comes out all ready for seasoning!

If you can't remove the wood/bamboo handles, I have also done this is the past by wrapping the handles in wet paper towels and then foil over the paper towels. This method can affect the finsih of the varnish on the wood somewhat, but no worse for wear.

Another issue I have noticed with some woks (Helen and Joyce Chen woks always do this) is that the high all over temps from being in the oven expand and contract the rivets that hold the handle holder to the wok, permanently changing their size, and therefore the handle will never be "factory tight" again--still fine to use and some will be barely notice, but the very slight wiggle of the handle drives me nuts...! I like my pans and woks ROCK hard and ultra steady!

But again, the high temp bake is a really easy and simple way to remove those stupid lacquer coatings from carbon steel pans and woks.

Mar 18, 2014
toddster63 in Cookware

Hand Hammered Wok from E-Wok Review

Round bottom woks work great on gas stoves. But as to wether you need a wok ring or not--that is very dependent on your stove configuration. Some stoves have great burner grates that fit round bottomed woks just fine and no ring required. Other stoves, NO--the burner grate makes the wok too wobbly and you need a wok ring for sure. It's very variable. Some stove manufacturers recognize this and make optional accessory specialized wok burner grates made for round bottomed woks on their stoves.

Nov 11, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

Hand Hammered Wok from E-Wok Review

Looks gorgeous, Lucky...

They often refer to carbon steel as iron in China, and often their "alloy recipes": have a tad more iron in them. But it is essentially carbon steel. Carbon steel is essentially a steel recipe with a touch more iron in it...

May 22, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

Recommended pressure cooker?

The Prestos work fine, no doubt. A little harder to dial in, and MUCH louder than the KR's....

If you want to debate how quiet the Prestos are, well then this conversation if over for me...! Prestos (or any Pressure cooker with the old fashioned steam valve cover) make quite a bit of noise in my experience, period. The design has been around for 75+ years and works well even non-updated, but they are NOT quiet.

And I really rarely hear the KR with the very modern steam escape valve.

I've also only heard great things about KR's US service...

May 09, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

Recommended pressure cooker?

Yeah, my Faogr took a little more tuning and watching and attention to work well—sold it! To me a pressure cooker is about saving time, NOT about being tied to the kitchen.

The Kuhn Rikon is so much easier. For most recipes after it is heated to the second red line appearing, you turn the burner down to low-low-lowest. set the kitchen timer and walk away. If it makes any noise whatsoever (meaning it's over pressurized), I go and pay attention to it (has only happened twice over the years).

When I am doing a large maxed out load (carnitas), it needs a bit more heat for that much (6-8 lbs.) meat, so it gets set to low-medium, a tad higher than low.

Also have never ever had the Kuhn Rikon spew food out of the top escape valve (where the steam exits) or get anything on it's pretty polished lid—ever. All the other PC's I've used at one point spew food gunk out on the lid, and then I have to worry if the valve got clogged from the food gunk, and so take it all apart, clean it and make sure it is all good to go. Ugg, work...!

I think it's great that everyone wants to love their under $75 PC bargains and more power to 'ya. But there is a reason the Kuhn Rikon cost almost $200, and you can really see it when you have lived with all kinds of PC's. So don't fool yourself that it's just overpriced Euro-nonsense. It really is a superior, easier to live with and operate pressure cooker. Period.

May 05, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

Recommended pressure cooker?

My friend has a Presto, and it seems to work well, but dang that thing is loud! YOU REALLY HAVE TO SPEAK UP TO HAVE A CONVERSATION IN THE KITCHEN while that Presto is hissing and splattering and whistling and carrying on. It reminds me SO MUCH of my grandma's pressure cooker from 1946. It seems more geared toward an exhibit at the Smithsonian than in the modern kitchen.

Whereas my modern Kuhn Rikon is silent. While it's cooking in my kitchen you can have a conversation while whispering...!

It's all a matter of getting what you pay for. Personally, i'd rather pay the Europeans a few more dollars for a quiet pressure cooker (made from modern designs) that the neighbors don't have to hear and that will allow me to answer the phone without—"HELLO?! HELLO?! PLEASE SPEAK UP, THE PRESSURE COOKER IS ON AND I CAN'T HEAR YOU! HELLO?! DID YOU HEAR ME?! HELLO?!"

May 05, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

Losing faith in cast iron cookware

No, my family thinks I am nuts, but one of the lessons I learned from Grace Young, from her father, is that everyone is at the table waiting while I stir fry. They dish up their rice while I oook, and then in I thunder and serve. They often bitch with the high temp outside stir fries that it is too hot to eat so quickly out of the wok, but they do taste the wok hei....

I have had wok hei last for around 5 minutes a few times...

Apr 06, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

Losing faith in cast iron cookware

Good post, Chem, true stuff... I think a seasoned cast iron skillet could deliver wok hei, but as you say, tossing and moving food in a skillet really sucks...

As someone who stir fries at least once a week, I can say from my experience that wok heir is very, very elusive. Period. It's not just about high heat and a seasoned metal surface, though these two pieces of the puzzle are required. But other factors play a big part too—the freshness of the food is a BIG factor not talked about by most people, expect for wok expert Grace Young.

But I have seen this—sometimes even while stir frying outside over my 75K burner, with seemingly fresh ingredients, the dish will come out just "okay', and definitely lacking in wok hei. And I've had dishes where from the first bite you know that, Yikes, that zucchini was past it's prime...!

Other times while cooking indoors over the electrical coil stove, with chicken thighs and sugar peas and bean sprouts that look practically identical to those from last week (that tasted just "okay"), the wok hei is rampant and the dish superlative—though the ingredients seemed identical.

My family and friends have seen this as well. It's never known what will come out of the wok that evening. Wok hei is indeed elusive. You do get more of it with the higher heat burners and the more searing of the food's surfaces, like with my outdoor propane burner. But with the right fresh veggies and fresh meats, you can produce it in the home kitchen too...

Apr 06, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

I want to get started with Chinese cooking

ATTENTION ALL:

Here is a link to a YouTube video showing a decent high temp stir fry on an electrical coiled stove:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBYPg6...

Note that the gentleman is occasionally removing the wok to let it cool slightly—even on an electrical range you can get the wok too hot and damage the seasoning (professionals use knee or foot controls to turn their high heat burners off and on).

He is also using the ideal wok—the USA made flat bottomed wok that has a thick pad of steel on the bottom that holds the heat well. It also comes with a classicic long wooden handle so you won't need the oven mitts. Tane sells them at the wokshop.com.

Don't let anyone tell you that it's not possible to get a good stir fry (wok hei) on an electrical stove—it is possible, I can tell you that! Little less wok hei than with a high powered wok burner, but still can be delicious!

Mar 28, 2013
toddster63 in Home Cooking

I want to get started with Chinese cooking

<"...Don not even look at electric or cast iron woks. The electric cannot get hot enough. The cast iron used in Asia are lighter than those available here and the cast iron we get here are awkward to maneuver and can get too hot and hold the heat for too long....">

For many users, and expecially for petite women, this is very good advice. However for some people with weak stoves (particularly low flame gas ranges), the 12 pound HEAVY Lodge cast iron wok can finally make a searing hot stir fry an option. This wok takes a long time to heat up to 550F-600F (ideal stir fry temp), but once hot it will stay hot and allow a searing stir fry where you might indeed approach "wok hei". It does stay too hot for too long, and you often have to wear oven mitts to move it off the flame to cool slightly, and while the stir fry finishes, before adding your sauce. When I added sauces to the HOT, hot Lodge wok over the flame, the sauce would burn to the sides of the wok and make a mess that often did not taste well.

Yes, moving this heavy cast iron wok on and off the flame is a giant PITA, but if you have a weak stove and carbon steel just won't work, the Lodge may be just the ticket to allow you to cook true high temp stir fries like the pros. Most of know the terrible result of a too low temp stir-stew in a too cold carbon steel wok on a classical American stove (often happens after loading enough food for 4 people in a 14" wok).

If interested check out the many informative user reviews of the Lodge wok on Amazon.com. Many who failed with carbon steel have migrated to this heavy wok and rave over it. Research for yourself...!

Mar 28, 2013
toddster63 in Home Cooking

I want to get started with Chinese cooking

I agree. Kuo's book is great for the basics, for the beginner... Many recipes (and in particular many techniques) in there that I still use. It's very Cantonese in nature. however, and for those whose tastes veer more toward spicy modern American Chinese cuisine, more Szechuan in elemental nature, may not be big fans of the more blander Cantonese thrust Kuo gives. Great basic Chinese (Cantonese) cooking manual though...

Mar 28, 2013
toddster63 in Home Cooking

Losing faith in cast iron cookware

Mr, Taster, something you might want to try—the Lodge cast iron wok. This is a hefty (12 pounds) cast iron wok with a thick plate of iron at the base. It takes a long time to heat up (10-15 minutes). But once hot it stays hot and allows very nice searing stir fries even over mediocre flames. This behemoth of a cast iron wok just weighs so much that it holds a LOT of heat to make it stay hot.

I found it to have a learning curve. I would have to remove it from the heat in the middle of the stir fry, before things were done, and wait for it to cool while the sir fry continued (and things will still sizzle for several minutes even off the heat), before adding my sauce at the end. If I tried to add the sauce while it was still on the stove, it was so hot the sauce (stock, soy, cornstarch, oyster sauce) would just burn onto the sides of the wok and create a mess that rarely tasted very good. In order to preserve the sauce, and therefore the stir fry, I really did have to remove it from the heat and finish the stir fry with no heat and then add the sauce as the wok cooled, It was a little bit of a PITA, as the wok gets very hot including the handles, so you need oven mitts to move it, and it does weigh 12 pounds, but for those with really weak burners, it could be just the ticket. I recommend researching it on Amazon.com for more information. Many, many people have raved over it and offer their experience and tips are studded among its many reviews on Amazon.

I find cast iron harder to season at high temps, but I did get some wok hei from the Lodge. I really did prefer the carbon steel in the end, with my burners and my techniques. But the Lodge really could be ideal for many users frustrated with low BTU's...

Mar 27, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

Losing faith in cast iron cookware

Unfortunately in you are indeed in the minority then. I have had more difficulty cooking on friend's gas ranges. Some can be quite weak. I know from my experience that the classic electrical coil stove can work, and that is the type of stove often accused of not being able to get hot enough. As posted earlier, this is just nonsense.

Looks like the next option if you are serious about woking is one of the outside burners. They are nice, though intimidating for the first few months of use...!

Mar 27, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

I want to get started with Chinese cooking

This is large part myth that you cannot do wok hei infused stir fries on American stoves. I have two wok cooking mods—my outside 120K cast iron propane wok burner (just like India Joze's sells), and I also use the same flat bottomed wok on my electrical coil stove indoors. In the last 5 years I have purchased and used 18 woks, and 4 wok burners. I have chosen a flat bottom wok as it works equally well on the outside propane wok burner, as well as on my electrical coil stove. I do miss the smoother operations of tossing food in a classic round Cantonese style wok, but the flat bottom isn't that much less fluid, as is, as I have said, much more versatile.

YES, you can make great wok hei infused dishes on a flat American stove. However, not for big servings—cooking for 2 at most at one time. For 4 people or molre, you should make 4-8 smaller sized dishes. If you have the right heavy bottomed carbon steel wok, and you let it get very hot, I can attest that very decent wok hei infused dishes are indeed possible. But you cannot use anything over a 14" wok, and you cannot overload it! We're talking 14 ounces of meat total, and 2-3 cups of veggies, tops!

YES, dishes do come out better outside on my intense propane wok burner. But something that is not taked about much is that with these intense wok burners, you cannot have them on full time during the stir fry or the food will burn and the seasoning on the wok will burn away. Just watch some of the professional Chinese wok cooks on YouTube to see for youselves; they control the heat on and off with either their feet or their knees. It takes practice to learn how much heat and for how long you can use with these intense wok burners. I rarely ever use mine on full blast, at 120K, it's just too much for my 14" and 16" woks. I normally cook around 60K-75K or so, and then only for a few minutes at a time ( I usually lift the wok and toss to allow it to lightly cool before going back on the flame). If you go too long the wok hei vanishes and you instead have a too smokey flavor, a burnt flavor. AND you damage the seasoning on your wok a lot. I highly value my seasoning on my woks and HATE this happening!

I adore my outside wok burner and it's intense flame (it seasons carbon steel so fast and so well), but again, you can do decent stir fries in small amounts on a flat American stove. I know, because I do it a few times a week...! Just remember to use a flat bottomed carbon steel wok with a padding of steel on the bottom (USA made, available at the wokshop.com), and let it preheat till smoking. It should be hot enough that when you add your peanut oil, the oil REALLY smokes before you quickly add your first food (which will cool the wok and stop a lot of the smoking).

What I tell people about woking indoors is that if you are not setting off your household smoke alarm at least once in a while (if not every time you stir fry), your wok is not hot enough—let it heat up more. You want enough vaporized oil from the intense heat to set your smoke alarm off, honestly. Wok like this and you will experience wok hei, believe me...

And very ocassionally I will stir fry in my 12" well seasoned carbon steel french skillet. It works, yes, but the motions and working with the food in a flat skillet is so clumsy compared to a high walled wok. And you have to be fast as you can overcook foods very fast in a flat skillet. It really is dramatically different than a wok and I don't like it for stir fries. My skillets are for dover sole fillets, hashbrowns, hamburgers and chops...

A big secret to my woking success (and family and friends always prod me to make stir fries and my chow fun and singapore noodles) is my infrared lazer thermometer gun (originally bought for my high temp pizza oven). Use it and you can easily measure when your wok or your skillet is at the right temp—550F-600F is about perfect. This is about the temp that when using non-stick woks and skillets that you will see the non-stick surface start to vaporize off into toxic fumes (which can kill any pet birds living in the household). Or if using stainless this is the temperature that when adding any food to the stainless surface it will instantly stick and turn black... You see, grasshopper, why seasoned carbon steel is so critical to high temperature (wok hei) woking? Ooops, cast iron works too, but starts to turn gray at 550F as the seasoning burns off of the iron.

The infrared lazer guns really are a joy—for measuring temps in all sorts of kitchen tasks—from candy making to measuring hot oil for deep frying to measuring your wok's proper searing hot temperature. You can get them nowadays on Ebay for around $25 or less.

Mar 27, 2013
toddster63 in Home Cooking

Losing faith in cast iron cookware

This is large part myth that you cannot do wok hei infused stir fries on American stoves. I have two wok cooking mods—my outside 120K cast iron propane wok burner (just like India Joze's sells), and I also use the same flat bottomed wok on my electrical coil stove indoors.

YES, you can make great wok hei infused dishes on a flat American stove. However, not for big servings—cooking for 2 at most at one time. For 4 people or more, you should make 4-8 smaller sized dishes. If you have the right heavy bottomed carbon steel wok, and you let it get very hot, I can attest that very decent wok hei infused dishes are indeed possible. But you cannot use anything over a 14" wok, and you cannot overload it! We're talking 14 ounces of meat total, and 2-3 cups of veggies, tops!

YES, dishes do come out better outside on my intense propane wok burner. But something that is not taked about much is that with these intense wok burners, you cannot have them on full time during the stir fry or the food will burn and the seasoning on the wok will burn away. Just watch some of the professional Chinese wok cooks on YouTube to see for youselves; they control the heat on and off with eiother their feet or their knees. It takes practice to learn how much heat and for how long you can use with these intense wok burners. I rarely ever use mine on full blast, at 120K, it's just too much for my 14" and 16" woks. I normally cook around 60K-75K or so, and then only for a few minutes at a time ( I usually lift the wok and toss to allow it to lightly cool before going back on the flame). If you go too long the wok hei vanishes and you instead have a too smokey flavor, a burnt flavor. AND you damage the seasoning on your wok a lot. I highly value my seasoning on my woks and HATE this happening!

I adore my outside wok burner and it's intense flame (it seasons carbon steel so fast and so well), but again, you can do decent stir fries in small amounts on a flat American stove. I know, because I do it a few times a week...! Just remember to use a flat bottomed carbon steel wok with a padding of steel on the bottom (USA made, available at the wokshop.com), and let it preheat till smoking. It should be hot enough that when you add your peanut oil, the oil REALLY smokes before you quickly add your first food (which will cool the wok and stop a lot of the smoking).

What I tell people about woking indoors is that if you are not setting off your household smoke alarm at least once in a while (if not every time you stir fry), your wok is not hot enough—let it heat up more. You want enough vaporized oil from the intense heat to set your smoke alarm off, honestly. Wok like this and you will experience wok hei, believe me...

Mar 27, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

Losing faith in cast iron cookware

It's so true isn't it?! I think eggs can really pick up flavors and seasoned surfaces really benefit them...

Sometimes, however, this seasoning can work against you. Last night my brother made a fresh blueberry cobbler in his Griswold cast iron skillet, and YECH—the crust-ish part tasted of meat and bacon, even lamb chop-ish (all of which he cooks a lot of in that skillet). I didn't care for that AT ALL! This seasoning can behoove cornbread maybe, but not more defined purely sweet dishes like cobbler...!

Mar 27, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

Losing faith in cast iron cookware

Good post, Josh, and very true. You need an assortment of tools for creative and good cooking. Personally I prefer my seasoned carbon steel skillets over the cast iron, but I do use my Griswold every so often. I think stainless steel pans are very important too (to make meats actually stick a bit and create a fond for pan sauces). Most will need a non-stick for eggs too, yes, but again I use my carbon steel for eggs at a slightly high temp and scrambled eggs are next to no sticking and tastes much better from the seasoned surface than any non-stick, for sure! And Josh is right—an enameled cast iron dutch oven is essential for serious cooks as well...

And for Asian freaks, like me, a basic carbon steel (NO non-stick!) wok is essential too. Would be lost without my favorite wok to make stir fries and noodles...

Mar 26, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

What is the difference between mineral steel and carbon steel?

Now that I look back, I can see why these pans were harder to season and take color—it must have been due to the beeswax melting off. Yet they still were very non-stick, even as the beautiful new seasoning would frustratingly wash away...

Mar 15, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

What is the difference between mineral steel and carbon steel?

Thanks for the info, paulj...!

I think the Mineral B's don't rust because of the beeswax coasting on them. Then by the time they get seasoned well, as the beeswax is disappearing, they are seasoned and will not rust; plus the handles are silicone coated....

Mar 14, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware

What is the difference between mineral steel and carbon steel?

The Mineral B pans are actually made out of steel, but it is indeed a low carbon content steel. But it still qualifies to be called carbon steel as there is carbon in their alloyed mix.

Actually many parts of the world refer to carbon steel and cast iron as "iron pans". But we here in the US we are very regimented that iron means cast iron, and carbon steel means lighter weight high carbon alloys...

But the truth is that there can be many formulas in the metal-making and many designations. The Mineral B pans are a prime example. You may be comfortable calling them "iron pans", but my eyes make me call them "carbon steel" pans...

What matters is that they are great and useful tools for good cooks!

Mar 14, 2013
toddster63 in Cookware