Video Snacks rss

OK Go Is Toast

You gotta hand it to OK Go. They're roughly 50 percent musicians, 50 percent video artists, and 100 percent interesting. The band that made a musical performance on treadmills into an inescapably well-known image (and followed up with a Rube Goldberg video that easily ranks among the five most ambitious videos ever produced) is back with a stop-motion animation video literally etched into pieces of toast. It's a bit more soft-spoken than a bowling ball triggering a rolling barrel that starts a car rolling indoors, but it's still quite beautiful.

 

 

Food Commercials from Old-Timey Times

A Chowhound post on Old Food or Product Commercials that You Miss? made me want to do some digging on YouTube. Waste some time in the way-back machine and sit way too close to the screen with me now! Can't help but notice that the next thing about to come on after this old Mazola commercial is the Paul Lynde Halloween Special. Man oh MAN do I want to watch that!



READ MORE

Pumpkin + Beer = Clever … For a Minute

Salon featured a video yesterday on brewing beer in a pumpkin, and both the topic (cask-o'-lantern) and the franchise (Working Class Foodies) struck me as clever. (The video is actually a show from Hungry Nation.) READ MORE

SF Coffee Wars in Ken Burns Fashion

The SF-based sketch comedy group Killing My Lobster spoofs hipsters, the coffee craze, and those grainy, old-timey History Channel documentaries in this short film. I especially like the crotchety guy at 1:25.

Snickers Satisfies and Terrifies

The horrifying new Halloween ad for Snickers gets big points for going beyond cute-scary and mock-scary and striding into the realm of, well, somewhat legitimately unnerving. Halloween has for decades been a fantastically macabre holiday that has been cuted within an inch of its undead existence, so it's nice to see a stock Halloween offering tap into the original spirit of the day a little bit. (Martha Stewart also deserves a hat-tip for staying grimly on point even while being compulsively crafty.)

 

 

via copyranter

Hamburgers Are Heroin

An Australian anti-child-obesity commercial gets down to business with a stark clarity that Jamie Oliver can only dream of: With a few deft visual flourishes, it equates feeding your child a hamburger to pumping smack directly into his innocent little arm. Fair? Not particularly. Clear and vivid? Yeah, definitely.

 

 

 

[Via copyranter]

How to Make an Illegal Harlem Street Beverage

What's $5, fruity, and makes your day a whole lot more blurry? It's nutcracker, an illegal Harlem street beverage that is, in broad strokes, a sweet punch made from whatever alcohol and whatever fruit juice and/or fruity candy you've got on hand. The New York Times covered nutcracker last week, so it's reached new levels of prominence. In a way, this guy really isn't too different from someone who sells jams or pies at a farmers' market. Except that cops don't hand you summonses for doing that.

A Gummy Bear Dies With Style

Via the always entertaining Laughing Squid: A red gummy bear is dropped into a test tube of potassium chlorate. What's the critically important thing to understand about this?

"Molten potassium chlorate is a strong oxidizing agent that reacts violently with sugar. Gummy bears have lots of sugar in them."

Fast Food Kills!

So says the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, a nonprofit that operates much in the mold of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. In this commercial, set to air in DC during the Daily Show on September 16, the PCRM urges, "Tonight, make it vegetarian." Well, I'm certainly not in the mood for a Big Mac after this.

Surreal Japanese Cough Drop Commercial

I was fully poised to write something insightful about Big Corn lobbying to rebrand high fructose corn syrup (boo! hiss!) as delicious, wholesome "corn sugar" (yay! healthy!). And then, this Japanese ad for Halls cough drops cropped up.

Arriving via copyranter, this Halls spot had better be drawing on some insider baseball–style cultural cues, because otherwise it's just deeply incomprehensible and a little disturbing. Also: kind of brilliant. Dalí would approve.