The CHOW Blog rss

Insights, tips, and restaurant reports from CHOW editors and Chowhound.

Heat

Heat

Every home chef's fantasy book. READ MORE

Gastronomica

Gastronomica

Our favorite food, on paper. READ MORE

Vegan with a Vengeance

Vegan with a Vengeance

No animals were harmed in the writing of this book. READ MORE

Stalking the Wild Asparagus

Stalking the Wild Asparagus

Read this, then eat the great outdoors. READ MORE

The Omnivore’s Dilemma

The Omnivore’s Dilemma

Required reading for anyone who eats. READ MORE

Homegrown Pure and Simple

Homegrown Pure and Simple

Learn to grow your own. READ MORE

Grub

Grub

Read yourself sustainable. READ MORE

A Real Dive

Are you thrifty enough and environmentally committed enough to shop for food out back of the supermarket? Once thought to be the province of the truly down-on-their-luck and adventurous starving students, Dumpster diving for food has attracted (at least a couple of) people who dive as comment on our wasteful culture.

In an article in the Contra Costa Times, Berkeley, California, residents Cynthia Powell and Stephen Vajda talk about their lifestyle:

There is so much food thrown away and there are so many starving people in the world, it’s shameful to let it go to waste when it’s just as easy for me to eat it. It’s really disgusting when you have an apple (from a grocery store) with a blemish on it and people won’t buy it.

Perhaps what’s really new here is the mainstream-media attention, since groups like the Freegans and Food Not Bombs have long practiced the art of acquiring cast-off food for free to reduce their environmental footprint.

Luckily Vajda and Powell live in Berkeley, where law enforcement has a relaxed attitude toward this type of activity: “The biggest problem we have with people Dumpster-diving is they make a mess,” notes a spokesman for the Berkeley police department.

Instant Entertaining

Instant Entertaining

Low-key holiday hosting. READ MORE

No Ifs, Ands or Big Red Butts

As a holiday gift for pun-loving headline writers everywhere, the Maine Bureau of Liquor Enforcement has decided to ban the distribution of Santa’s Butt Winter Porter. When we first heard this story, we figured the label of the imported British brew would be showing more of Santa than even Mrs. Claus wants to see. However, the illustration is actually Norman Rockwell-cute, featuring a broad-beamed but fully clothed St. Nick seated on a jumbo-sized beer barrel (also known as a butt, hence the name), a loaded stein at the ready while he goes through his list, checking it twice.

And that’s just the problem, says Maine State Police Lt. Patrick Fleming. The ruddy-cheeked guy might appeal to children, setting them up for a lifetime of … buying pricey small-batch microbrews with silly names? Thank goodness some beer-geek lawyers at the Maine Civil Liberties Union Foundation have a little time on their hands; citing First Amendment rights to artistic expression, they’ll be working overtime this holiday season to put Santa’s Butt where it belongs—right into your hot little hands.

However, it’s not the first time that distributor Daniel Shelton has had trouble with his labels. Both Connecticut and New York have tried to ban their Seriously Bad Elf ale, along with a few of their other holiday-themed brews. Says Shelton from the company’s headquarters in the appropriately named Belchertown, “Last year it was elves. This year it’s Santa. Maybe next year it’ll be reindeer.”

But we’re putting our foot down over offering Comet, Cupid, and Vixen a couple of cold ones—we’d hate to see Lt. Fleming have to arrest the fat guy for flying with intoxicated reindeer.