Where Gyro Meat Is Born

The food blog for Washington City Paper reports on a new Greek joint in Bethesda called Yamas Mediterranean Grill and inadvertently points out a widely known but rarely contemplated fact about the gyros we eat coast to coast: They're mostly frozen and from Chicago. The story's opener:

"Chances are, if you bought a gyro lately, you bit into compressed meat processed in some cold, mechanized Chicago plant and then trucked frozen to your friendly Greek sandwich shop just around the corner." In contrast, Yamas makes its own gyro rotisserie two or three times daily.

The owners "hired Turkish chef Mediha Keler and taught her the Greek way of producing gyro meat: Keler marinates freshly sliced beef and lamb overnight in lemon juice, olive oil, and fresh herbs and spices and then painstakingly builds the gyro towers for each day’s service."

Man, does that sound terrific. It should be a clarion call to the next gyro place to open anywhere in this country that wants to make a local splash.

Image source: Flickr member @joefoodie under Creative Commons