More Fake Diet Chocolate

Bubble Chocolate

Bubble Chocolate

I Paid: $2.49 for a 2.82-ounce bar (prices may vary by region)

Taste: 3 stars

Marketing: 5 stars

Candy bars very similar to the new Bubble Chocolate were launched here twice before, and failed in both instances. The first time was in the ’70s, with a bar called Choco-Lite, and the second was in the 1980s, when it was called Aero. (The Aero bar is big in the UK and Australia, though.) So what is this bar anyway, and why don’t Americans like it?

Bubble Chocolate is aerated, which means it’s in light, flaky layers (sort of like a chocolate croissant) that collapse into powdery dust on your tongue. I would guess that the bar failed in the past because, stateside, there’s a perception that weight equals value. Americans like big, meaty portions, and this thing is featherweight.

Nevertheless, it’s not a bad candy car. As the chocolate melts, it seems to coat your mouth, and the pronounced chocolate flavor asserts itself, so the product seems more substantial than it is.

This time around, Bubble Chocolate is trying to do what Mars did for 3 Musketeers: turn its Achilles heel (the candy bar tastes light and insubstantial) into a selling point for dieters (this light chocolate bar has fewer calories per bite!). Arguably a diet food, a large bar is 2.82 ounces and about 400 calories. But at least unlike the previously reviewed huffable chocolate, it’s meant to be eaten.

James Norton edits the Upper Midwestern food journal Heavy Table. He's also the coauthor of a book on Wisconsin's master cheesemakers. Follow CHOW on Twitter, and become a fan on Facebook.