Whole Grains 101

Whole Grains 101(cont.)

Kamut

Kamut

Kamut is an ancient relative of durum wheat.

What to Buy: It can be found as berries, flour, or pasta. We like all three forms, but the texture and flavor of the berries make them our first choice.

Favorite Cooking Method: The berries take a long time to cook, so we put them in a slow cooker on low and let them go for 6 to 8 hours.

Favorite Recipe: Kamut with Mushrooms and Blue Cheese.

Other Prep Ideas: Use kamut pasta in your favorite noodle dish.

Millet

Millet

Though it’s largely used as bird seed in the United States, millet is a staple in the Far East and is considered one of the world’s oldest cultivated grains.

What to Buy: It can be found as grains or flour.

Favorite Cooking Method: Toast 1 cup of millet in a dry, covered pan until browned, then add 2 1/2 cups of water and simmer until the liquid has been absorbed, about 20 minutes. Let stand covered briefly, then fluff and serve.

Favorite Recipe: Toasted Millet Salad.

Other Prep Ideas: Serve it as a breakfast cereal or try it in place of polenta.

Quinoa

Quinoa

Actually the seed of a plant related to spinach, quinoa was a staple for the ancient Incans; it’s highly nutritious and a complete protein.

What to Buy: It can be found as seeds (in yellow or red) or flour.

Favorite Cooking Method: Add 1 cup of quinoa to 2 cups of salted boiling water and simmer until the liquid has been absorbed, about 15 minutes.

Favorite Recipe: Warm Quinoa Salad with Roasted Autumn Vegetables and Ginger-Scallion Dressing.

Other Prep Ideas: Use it in a simple salad or try it in hash browns.

Teff Grain

Teff

The smallest grain in the world, teff measures about 1/32 inch in diameter. Teff flour is fermented to make injera, the spongy bread served with Ethiopian food.

What to Buy: Teff can be found as grains or flour.

Favorite Cooking Method: Bring 3 1/2 cups of water to a boil, whisk in 1 cup of teff, and simmer until the liquid has been absorbed, about 20 minutes.

Favorite Recipe: Teff Porridge with Honey and Dates.

Other Prep Ideas: Try it in place of polenta.

Wheat Berries

Wheat Berries

The whole, unprocessed kernels of the wheat plant, wheat berries are chewy and have a unique flavor.

What to Buy: There are many types of whole wheat berries for sale, but the distinctions don’t matter unless you are grinding the berries for flour.

Favorite Cooking Method: Simmer wheat berries in a large pot of heavily salted water until tender, about 45 minutes. Drain and serve.

Favorite Recipe: Wheat Berry Salad with Harissa and Pistachios.

Other Prep Ideas: Add wheat berries to any grain salad or serve as an alternative to rice.