Ice Cream of the Godsl

Pacojet (Model 16000)
Pacojet, $3,450

The first time I experienced the Pacojet was on a hot day in Vegas. One of the company’s partners took Krispy Kreme doughnuts, added them to a beaker filled with milk, froze it, and then whizzed me up some doughnut gelato in his machine. I took a bite and nearly swooned. It was the full-on, sweet and yeasty, Hot Light experience in cold, creamy spoonfuls.

The must-have appliance of experimental pro chefs, Pacojet makes sorbet and ice cream that are more velvety and ethereally light than any you’ve ever had in your life. The machine looks like an old-school drip coffeemaker but is actually a high-powered, precise Swiss food processor that takes food that’s been frozen rock-solid and shaves it at 2,000 rpm, in layers less than 2 microns thick. To get an idea of how fine that is, a strand of silk is about 7 microns thick. The results are ultrasmooth, with no ice crystals surviving the whirling internal blade.

Pacojet makes sorbet and ice cream that are more velvety and ethereally light than any you’ve ever had in your life.

The Pacojet might look a little complicated from the photo, but it’s actually easy to use. You dump your ingredients into a wide-mouthed steel canister that the company calls a “beaker,” freeze it, stick the beaker in the machine, and push a few buttons to “Pacotize.” Twenty seconds later you’ve got amazing ice cream.

You can select the number of portions, each about 3.5 ounces, with the machine’s plus and minus buttons. The Pacojet allows you to make one portion at a time or shave the whole beaker’s-worth. If you chose to process just one portion, only the top layer will be ready to serve, swirled around the inside. The rest of the beaker’s contents will still be frozen rock-solid at the bottom, to be Pacotized later.

This also means you can customize each portion. Say you’re making ice cream for a group, and your first guest wants plain vanilla. Whiz up one portion, and spoon it out. Your next guest wants a shot of Bailey’s in his. Pour the alcohol over the frozen base that’s left, and process another portion. The alcohol will be blended right in.

Coupe set blades, sold separately, blend fresh foods into meat terrines and herb concentrates, but ice cream is the real draw here.