Chow 101: Vinegar

There’s a range of vinegar out there. Hounds survey the options.

Rice vinegar, made from fermented rice, is mild and slightly sweet. It’s used a lot in Asian cooking.

Balsamic vinegars can be exquisite (and exquisitely expensive). The fancy ones are aged for years in barrels, and are syrupy and sweet. Industrial balsamics are good all-purpose, dark-colored vinegars.

Minus 8 vinegar is made in Canada from grapes picked at -8 degrees centigrade. It’s expensive and hard to find. You can sip this stuff alone like an aperitif, but it’s good with foie gras, and fruit. You’ll find some recipes on their web site.
Champagne, sherry, and red or white wine vinegars are very nice.

Look for “verjus”, a sour liquid made from unripe fruit (mainly grapes). It comes in red or white, and is used like vinegar. It’s light and has the advantage of not clashing with wine (as vinegars do).

Asian markets are a good source of inexpensive vinegars. Try a brown rice vinegar or one of the red vinegars. liu says they all have different personalities.

A few drops of a light vinegar will bring out the flavor of a good olive oil, notes Richard.

Board Links: Balsamic Vinegar