Where to Buy Amazing Flour Online

It’s a brave new world for the home baker. In the now-distant past (as late as a year ago, actually), if you were serious about making bread at home the only decision about flour you had to make was which unbleached white flour gave the best lift and the chewiest crumb. But a revolution in grains, driven by a revival of heirloom grain production and stone milling, has made the options way more interesting. Where to score this amazing bounty online? Read on:

BOB’S RED MILL
This Oregon-based mill stone grinds its grains using quartz millstones, which leaves the healthy part of the grain intact. A good source for gluten-free flours as well as esoteric flours like teff (essential for Ethiopian injera bread), green pea, and organic kamut. Bob's products are also available in grocery stores.

CAPUTO’S “00” FLOUR
This 90-year-old mill in Naples, Italy, has long been hailed on Chowhound as the best source of flour for making pizza dough from scratch.

DAKOTA PRAIRIE ORGANIC FLOUR COMPANY
Located in North Dakota, this mill has a separate, updated gluten-free facility that ensures no cross-contamination. It offers a wide range of gluten-free baking mixes, as well as conventional and organic gluten-free flours like flax, garbanzo, and sorghum.

HEARTLAND MILL
These Kansas stone-ground flours are tempered 50 percent longer than the stuff from other U.S. mills, which is said to yield better flavor.

KING ARTHUR FLOUR
King Arthur Flour has been milling flour for over two centuries, currently in Vermont. Its products are now found in most grocery stores.

SUNRISE FLOUR MILL
This Minnesota mill is one of the only ones in the U.S. focusing on heritage grains, specifically Turkey Red and Red Fife wheats. They’re more nutritious than conventional high-yielding wheats and uniquely flavored.

WAR EAGLE MILL
Organic flour from the only working mill in Arkansas (for over 180 years!), powered by an 18-foot cypress waterwheel.

More flour talk on CHOW and beyond:
Looking for Caputo 00 flour
Flour Matters
• And check out this great Serious Eats story: On Flour Types, Foams, and Pizza Dough

Photo by Chris Rochelle